Hammock Tips

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Oliver G

Full Member
Sep 15, 2012
62
10
Melbourne
Good Morning All,

Unfortunately I won't be able to make it to next weekend's meet up, but hopefully I'll be able to make it to the next one.

Could I ask the regulars a favour?

I'm normally a ground dweller but I wouldn't mind giving hammocking a shot, I have a DD camping hammock that pops out occasionally in the garden but I've never brought one out on a camping trip. I don't suppose someone could show me the ropes so to speak?

In terms of kit I've a 3x3 to go over the top and climbing slings and gear a plenty to strap onto trees with. Sleeping gear wise I've got various roll mats and doss bags.

(On a complete aside, what's the etiquette with fire wood, my partner is a ranger so we have a pretty limitless supply, is there a central wood store we can contribute to?)

Thanks in advance,

Ollie
 

Hammock_man

Full Member
May 15, 2008
1,211
226
kent
In short it seems you have all the kit. I slept in a DD for years and my daughter still does. By the next meet I take it you mean Summer moot. I think you will find that you will have many folk more then willing to help with your set up. ( I, for one, will be glad to.) Keep this thread live and you will get plenty of help / advice.
 

Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,447
1,546
61
Exmoor
Do you have an underquilt? I spent many years without one using just a mat. Had many rather cool nights !
Now I have two , makes such a difference to your comfort factor even in the summer. I realy recommend you get one. They are not expensive., and well worth the investment .
 

Paulm

Full Member
May 27, 2008
1,043
106
Hants
The DD camping hammock is quite short and narrow, I use one for lazing around in the garden or woods but it wouldn't be comfortable enough for sleeping all night in, for me at least being tall and broad shouldered. Depending on your own build you may have more chance of being comfy in their frontline or frontline xl models.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
2,622
1,841
Mid Wales
As a rough guide to test if your hammock is big enough for you, grab hold of both edges near the middle and stretch your arms out; the hammock should be at least as wide as your outstretched arms - if not you'll not get a comfortable diagonal lie which is essential (for most people) for a comfy night.

I also recommend you get an under-blanket; I hate the way the sleep mats move around during the night even in double-skin hammocks.

Having said all that, download a copy of the 'The Ultimate Hang' onto your phone and just have a go with what you've got :)
 

Oliver G

Full Member
Sep 15, 2012
62
10
Melbourne
Given that I'm 6 foot and 16 stone the camping hammock may be pushing it. Thanks for all the tips though, I've given it some try outs down in the basement. With the under-quilt, will a jungle sleeping bag suffice?
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
2,622
1,841
Mid Wales
I tried with a sleeping bag at first and had partial success so it may be worth a go. You need it to hang under the hammock in such a way that you don't compress it or pull it tight or it won't have the loft necessary to keep you warm. I found it quite hard to fasten it to the edges of the hammock to achieve that. Have a play in your basement though and see what you can achieve.
 

BigMonster

Full Member
Sep 6, 2011
1,051
70
Manchester
Basics:

1. You need tarp over your head. hammock+suspension to keep you off the ground, bottom insulation (mat or underquilt), top insulation (sleeping bag).
2. There are two main types of hammock, traditional (DD, Tenth wonder, Clarke) which is generally cheaper and easier to make, and diagonal lay (all hand made brands) which are more comfortable but more expensive.
3. Tarp is used just like A frame for ground dwelling. Hammock suspension is semi easy as it have to be done properly to hold your weight. Hardest bit is getting the bottom insulation right, mat might slip around, underquilt can shift away. That is the bit that needs practicing and testing before camping out.
 

Oliver G

Full Member
Sep 15, 2012
62
10
Melbourne
So given it a shot last night, simple set up with the webbing straps provided. i created a couple of small loops on the hammock itself and then used, on both sides, a length of webbing with a figure 8 loop to lash to a point and then looped the hammock on a marlin spike hitch. I've popped in a paracord ridge line that goes back on itself with a prussick to try and get a consistent hang. Now need to work out how to convert the sleeping bag to a quilt, time to crack out the sewing machine.

The dog certainly liked the hammock being up.
 

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