GPS recommendations

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barryasmith

Full Member
Oct 21, 2007
285
0
Herts
Hi there, Just getting back into hill walking now that the kids are old enough to come along and was thinking of buying a GPS to assist with navigation.

I want something that has a display showing maps so that I can verify where I am (or where I think I am!) on an OS map which is what I would prefer to use for most of my navigation.

With regard to maps I need a UK base map as we do visit various places and the option to add on other locations such as Sweden when we head up there.

I'm looking for something light and robust that doesn't cost the earth and I am happy to go second hand to get something worthwhile.

Any recommendations?

Best

Barry
 

Tonyuk

Settler
Nov 30, 2011
882
50
Scotland
Depending on how much you want to spend you can go with a model that shows the manufacturers own style of map, the ones that show in OS maps are definitely at the dearer end of the scale. personally i wouldn't bother, i use an old garmin etrex and just take the grid ref from it to check against the map.

Tonyuk
 

SiWhite

Nomad
Apr 1, 2007
343
22
42
Deepest North Hampshire
I have an Etrex Touch which is nice and fast as GPSs go, but still laggy compared to an iPhone. Most of my mapping is done with software on an iPhone - far cheaper and easier unless you are adamant you want a dedicated GPS.
 

Brynglas

Full Member
Why not look at a standard etrex, very accurate and all you need as a back up to your Map,& Compass. Mapping GPS recievers are expensive and usually don't have particularly good displays. Etrex will give you a position to relation to your Map very effectively.

Sent from my SGP521 using Tapatalk
 

barryasmith

Full Member
Oct 21, 2007
285
0
Herts
Guys, thanks all for the suggestions. plenty to work with there! I do want a dedicated unit, I have seen how quickly GPS drains my phone battery and wouldnt want to rely on it in the wilderness.

Cheers

Barry
 

rancid badger

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Depending on how much you want to spend you can go with a model that shows the manufacturers own style of map, the ones that show in OS maps are definitely at the dearer end of the scale. personally i wouldn't bother, i use an old garmin etrex and just take the grid ref from it to check against the map.

Tonyuk
Same here. I almost threw nearly £450 at a new garmin a few months back but decided to stick with what I've been doing for years, as above.

Thing is, folk who are going to use a high end gps with os maps built in are going to end up depending on the unit, they're bound to and it's not that surprising that it happens. What's the point of spending that sort of money on a gadget which doesn't really do much else thats worthwhile, if you're not going to use it? All of which is fine until you drop it and kill it or else drop it and lose it.
 

lucan

Nomad
Sep 6, 2010
379
1
East Yorks
Not wishing to confuse things further, I've been using a Samsung Galaxy Ace 3 solely as a GPS/Satnav, I removed everything off the Phone that i didn't want app wise so as to free up internal space, i put in a bigger memory card, ( for offline Maps ), removed the sim card, downloaded numerous free and paid Satnav, Hiking and GPS location apps.

I also have a Samsung Galaxy S 2 as my Mobile when out and about, i have a portable 8000 mah battery pack that has more than enough juice for a couple of full charges for each device, also i can tether the 2 together and use internet on both aswell as use the Ace 3 as a phone if the S 2 packs up.

The only thing that put me off getting a Garmin etc was in fact the Prices for the models that i wanted, i just couldn't justify paying that kind of money, I've found an alternative that works for me, I'ts cheap, If you have a couple of compatible phones kicking about give it a try, theres plenty of tutorials online.
 
I have a Garmin 60CSX and a 62S and I use maps derived from OpenStreetMap (OSM) on them, available wordwide. They can be free or paid for, according to added value, e.g. Talkytoaster. I use the 60CSX as my car satnav as well as the maps available are routable.

Despite the above I still use a map and compass to navigate and use the GPS to confirm that I'm not where I think I am, particularly in atrocious viz. The GPS screens (and phone screens) aren't really big enough, in my view, to get full value from a hike/map and orienting oneself with the lumpy/treed/other things around you. I also use the GPS units to do surveys for OSM to improve their maps.

I always carry one set of rechargable batteries and one set of regular batteries as spares for the GPS unit.

If your phone contains a GPS there is a free app available from the Ordnance Survey that you can download which will give you your grid ref, using the GPS feature in the phone so no need for a phone signal. The grid ref can then be looked up on your map for a fix.