First aid kit

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VFR800Essex

Tenderfoot
Feb 28, 2012
78
0
Essex UK
I haven't noticed anyone packing anything for burns/scalds. I would have thought being in the wild with fire and hot liquids this would have been a must have item. I pack a Burnshield of varying size dependant on the type of outdoor experience.
 

VFR800Essex

Tenderfoot
Feb 28, 2012
78
0
Essex UK
I don't know much but i know the cooler you keep it the less scaring you can get. What if you're a fair way from hospital? I see people have plastic bags in their kit but i don't see rolls of cling film.
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,784
1,259
62
Pembrokeshire
My REC trainer recommends industrial cling film - pallet wrap! - just as good as kitchen cling film but more durable - my basecamp kit contains a roll now.
I did a REC course the end of last year and an HSE course last friday ... both the trainers recommend cling film for burns - poly bags for hands/feet burn treatment.
Incontinence pads/disposable nappies/panty liners all make good non adherant dressings, gaffa tape makes good slings etc etc etc.
 

Graveworm

Full Member
Sep 2, 2011
366
0
London UK
My REC trainer recommends industrial cling film - pallet wrap! - just as good as kitchen cling film but more durable - my basecamp kit contains a roll now.
I did a REC course the end of last year and an HSE course last friday ... both the trainers recommend cling film for burns - poly bags for hands/feet burn treatment.
Incontinence pads/disposable nappies/panty liners all make good non adherant dressings, gaffa tape makes good slings etc etc etc.
You can use Pallet wrap of course and it will be much better than leaving it to the elements but food grade is made under sterile (Positive air pressure etc) conditions and has to be certified as such, also you don't want to be wrapping it tight so heavy duty is not such an issue, personally I'd get food grade if I was buying it just for first aid.

Again anything in a pinch, Nappies etc always used to be mentioned, however there have been some changes recently. I am not sure about incontinence pads but I suspect it is the same, I do know modern disposable nappies, sanitary towels and panty liners are discouraged now as they have semi-permeable membranes designed to help transport liquid away, that is great for menstrual blood and baby poo but the opposite of what you want in a dressing, as it hinders clotting.
 

mrcairney

Settler
Jun 4, 2011
839
1
West Pennine Moors
I've got a burn patch in my kit. Never had to use it. In fact, I've never had to use anything bar a plaster when I cut myself, and that was last year.

Having a comprehensive first aid kit is a good idea married with knowledge on how to act, but I'd be interested to hear how often people actually need to dip into it aside from maybe a blister patch or two.

Example, I've had a trauma dressing for a while, it's still in the vacuum packaging it came in. I only have it next to me when I'm carving with the axe, in case I take a leg off or something. In my living room.
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,784
1,259
62
Pembrokeshire
I've got a burn patch in my kit. Never had to use it. In fact, I've never had to use anything bar a plaster when I cut myself, and that was last year.

Having a comprehensive first aid kit is a good idea married with knowledge on how to act, but I'd be interested to hear how often people actually need to dip into it aside from maybe a blister patch or two.

Example, I've had a trauma dressing for a while, it's still in the vacuum packaging it came in. I only have it next to me when I'm carving with the axe, in case I take a leg off or something. In my living room.
I have had little use for my kit other than for patching up minor axe and knife cuts and treating a dislocated knee, the odd leech bite (I hate leeches!) and a couple of grazes - mainly on other folk!
Not bad for a lifetime in the outdoors!
The worst I had to deal with was a dislocated fracture of both sides of the elbow joint (on my father!) and that was just a case of imobilisation until the paramedics arrived ... no kit needed....
 

entropydog

Member
May 14, 2010
10
0
derby
Common sense is the most important.....Burns need to be cooled and hydrated as soon as possible, your fat reserve can keep heating and burning even after the original source is eliminated..A constant flow of cool water is best...the longer the better for any burn....However as I said common sense. A minor burn once saturated for as long as possible is best left in the open air...If we are thinking outdoors cling film is more likley to promote infection.. If you have a more serious burn you should be calling emergency services and maintaining constant saturation/hydration at all cost..Cling film is for no other option and you having to transport them yourself, like in a war zone....
 

Graveworm

Full Member
Sep 2, 2011
366
0
London UK
Common sense is the most important.....Burns need to be cooled and hydrated as soon as possible, your fat reserve can keep heating and burning even after the original source is eliminated..A constant flow of cool water is best...the longer the better for any burn....However as I said common sense. A minor burn once saturated for as long as possible is best left in the open air...If we are thinking outdoors cling film is more likley to promote infection.. If you have a more serious burn you should be calling emergency services and maintaining constant saturation/hydration at all cost..Cling film is for no other option and you having to transport them yourself, like in a war zone....
I love common sense, running water is good for cooling, I have reservations about the "Hydration" claims (drinking the water is probably better for that) but after the burn has been cooled infection is the biggest risk. The best way to prevent that is the cling film. When the emergency services arrive (1% partial thickness facial etc) that's exactly what they would do.
 
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Lister

Settler
Apr 3, 2012
991
0
33
Runcorn, Cheshire
One thing i've not seen in this thread (if it's in here i apologise) is the importance to check dates on dressings and medicines, or do people tend not to worry at that so much these days? I know on dresssings the day is only there to give a guide to how old the dressing is and when the sterility of it runs out (it'll still cover wounds etc but may not be sterile as it once was....least i think that's why they put the dates on them) and of course on meds it's the date the active ingredient deactivates so may not be as effective.
 

Robin DuBois

Member
Apr 29, 2013
13
0
nfa


mine uses what was sold to me as a 'trauma pouch' which contained a couple of basic dressings, including a sealed head wound dressing to break out when the real ****.
I carry this everywhere, literally, and it has been useful too many times to count.



its about to get restocked, its needing painkillers, more iodine, antibiotics, thermometer and super glue.
 

Outdoor_Explorer

New Member
Jul 14, 2014
6
0
Leeds
I take my first aid kit on every outdoor adventure, but it rarely gets used (lucky I suppose!) other than for the odd scrape here and there. I've got most things in there, including insect bite cream as the midges love me...even with repellent :(

I'd have to agree with most of the people on this thread, first aid kits should always have some form of burn treatment in there. I actually like to treat the more minor burns with aloe vera.
 
J

janeleonard

Guest
Its something great to carry a first aid kit always while we move on. It can help us in our emergencies and can make us feel safe and secure.
 
Jun 10, 2014
21
0
United Kingdom
Impressive. No-nonsense, practical & to the point. Looks like you work in the medical field.

Perhaps some 'crash' stuff can be added, like a pressure field dressing. My biggest worry when in the woods is a severe bleeding wound caused by axe/open fracture (although gauze+duct tape is a very good alternative...).
I know I am replying to a old post here, but I am a one of several designated first aiders at work and I always have a feminine pad, tampon etc in my first aid kit as they are designed specifically to contain large amounts of blood and ideal for emergency situations.
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
65
south wales
I know I am replying to a old post here, but I am a one of several designated first aiders at work and I always have a feminine pad, tampon etc in my first aid kit as they are designed specifically to contain large amounts of blood and ideal for emergency situations.
Your better off with proper dressings some of which have 'ties' which make things easier than messing about with a sanitary towel and of course they are sterile... sanitary towels and tampons are not.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Israeli-Bat...11128&sr=8-1&keywords=israeli+battle+dressing shop around though as prices vary. Sanitary towels are not designed to soak up a lot of blood, most women loose around 30-50ml IIRC, you loose a lot more with a major wound.
 
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