Collecting firewood in Scandinavia?

Dave

Hill Dweller
Sep 17, 2003
6,019
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Brigantia
What are the rules for collecting firewood In Norway, Sweden and Finland?

Are you allowed to cut down dead standing trees in the boreal forest, whilst winter wilderness camping?

Can you cut boughs from living trees, for placement on a floor inside a hot tent?

What about trees that have been blown over for instance, but still have live boughs on them?

Are there areas, where some of this is allowed, and other areas where its dissallowed?

Anyone got any links?

Thanks.


Interesting new downloadable article here from Paul Kirtleys website: How to live in a heated tent.
 
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Dave

Hill Dweller
Sep 17, 2003
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Brigantia
Both are good links, but neither make it clear on the issue of cutting down dead trees, or using fallen dead trees, for firewood, for use in a stove in a hot tent
 

Martti

Full Member
Mar 12, 2011
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Finland
Both are good links, but neither make it clear on the issue of cutting down dead trees, or using fallen dead trees, for firewood, for use in a stove in a hot tent
Fallen is ok in F:land, living never, unless specifically granted by landowner. Standing dead also off limits.
According to the Criminal Code of Finland (39/1889), only "dry twigs from the ground" are free to be collected without a permission. You need permission from the land owner for everything else, including cutting parts of fallen or standing dead trees.
 

Martti

Full Member
Mar 12, 2011
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Must use a broad definition of twig...
There are no law precedents that I can find, so the part on the publication is speculation from the Ministry of the Environment. However, one possible interpretation is that "twig" indeed means e.g. branches and boughs that have no monetary value for the landowner. You may often find dead branches dropped by Scots pines that probably have no use other than as firewood.
 

Dave

Hill Dweller
Sep 17, 2003
6,019
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Brigantia
Sweden is basically the same, yes
So when you watch Nordkalotten with lars monsen travelling all over the top of lapland, making big fires every night, has he asked permission? Is he on private land? Is he away from provincial parks?
 

Dave

Hill Dweller
Sep 17, 2003
6,019
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Brigantia
Well, I haven't seen it. He might have played by the rules, but who knows?

Greger

When I was in Sweden , in the winter we would break the dead branches off the bottom of conifers, for a small sami coffee fire, as they called it. Good for boiling a quick pot of water.

In Canada, in the provincial parks we were taking dead standing wood, or dead trees which had fallen. But on Crown land in the Canada, you could chop the boughs off live trees, because you would be in an area where there are an abundance of them.

So it sounds like Norway would be the same as Sweden. So every youtube video you see of people chopping down dead trees, must be on private land and they must have permission?

Sounds like if you want to go into the wilderness you may as well just take a primus with you.
 
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SGL70

Full Member
Dec 1, 2014
607
101
Luleå, Sweden
Well...there is some difference between what is allowed and what is done...you are not likely to get caught by the police or anything.
Also, in the unlikely event of meeting anyone in the woods, most people will not react badly to the presence of a fire.
 

pysen78

Forager
Oct 10, 2013
201
0
Stockholm
I realise this could feel like a let-down for some, who may have been taught that for instance Sweden is the land of milk and honey when it comes to camping in the wild. It's true that a lot more freedom is given here, than in many countries in continental europe, and we're proud of the ability to walk on all lands but military sensitive installations.
But it's a fragile give-and-take thing, where respect to the land owner and his/her interests has to be given, at the same time as enjoying the ability to pass through the property.

This "right to roam" is under scrutiny in Sweden at the moment, partly because it's not actually formal law. It's actually only a collection of activities that are not legislated against, but have been unformally collected as "rights" in many instances. As such, it's very fragile, and many of the "loopholes" that we all like to take advantage of, are likely to close up in the coming years. Lot of lobbying for that to happen.
Problem is, the current developing situation is that a lot of activities that were unheard of 100 years ago are common today. This includes weird stuff like industrial scale berry-picking on private land, and organized trips with busloads of tourists camping together and moving through prvate property, paying guides/organizers hefty sums, that never reach the land-owner.

All that as sort of a backdrop. But that being said, in areas where, as you say, trees are in abundance, it is more likely than not, that you will get the permissions you want, by looking up who owns the land, assurring them you're not a ****** who will burn down their livelyhood, and offer them some sort of compensation. A bottle of Scotch probably goes a long way.
Camping in one spot more than a night is, for instance, not allowed, but I've been granted that permission many times, simply by asking for it, and asking for a spot where the farmer or whatever would feel I'm out of his hair.

Big private landowners like companies in the lumber and paper industry can probably be persuaded aswell, but it may require some research. Public land is a bit trickier, I'd say.

Would you agree with me Greger? I'm mostly preaching from my experiences down south, but you're from up north so might take a different view?
 

Wayne

BCUK Welfare Officer
Mod
Dec 7, 2003
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www.forestknights.co.uk
When I have been travelling through Norway, Sweden and Finland I have always been careful to check the local policies for example in parts of Lake Saamia. It's national park land and fires in the forest are illegal. Be nice chat to the locals be a part of the land your travelling in and you will be rewarded with great hospitality.

Everything has value the same as this country. What seems like harmless fun to you chopping a small tree for a fire is going to be multiplied x1000 with the number of visitors to a location.
 

pysen78

Forager
Oct 10, 2013
201
0
Stockholm
I just noticed I used a word that may come across as a bit too offensive in my preceding post. Just to clarify; No offense meant, and certainly not calling anyone in particular any names. And thanks for editing it out, mods. /Cheers
 

SGL70

Full Member
Dec 1, 2014
607
101
Luleå, Sweden
@ Pysen78 I live in rural Sweden, so my sentiment might not be applicable outside the village borders :) Also, I own no land.

In my book it does not much matter if it is Company or private owned land, I light fires there....using what I get my hands on, in a manner of speaking.
The thing is, imho, is to do it with leaving as little signs as possible of my presence, so I stay for no more than one day/night, I rarely cut down anything (i prefer to use root stumps, dry branches/twigs etc for fire) etc.

just so you know....My neck of the Wood is not seeing a lot of people, if any.

In all, I wouldn't loose any sleep if I misstepped regarding lighting a fire, if everything else was in good order. It is a good thing to know what rules you are breaking, though :)

hmm....I am not sure that I made it any clearer, at all....

Cheers,
Greger
 
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Martti

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Mar 12, 2011
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