Bury or burn?

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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,298
1,391
McBride, BC
As soon as I can, I'll be putting my orders in to the growers and gardens for fresh local food.
They don't wrap stuff. It's in big boxes. XXX Clean, too. I'll feed the hand that feeds me.
You are expected to bring containers of the right size. Even to trade egg boxes.

I know, I know. This is a hellish hard thing to do in a big city. Every damn thing is so far apart.
Here in BC, local markets in some big cities have been prevented by law.
 

Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,622
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Exmoor
Just had a thought... I know I was sitting down! What about the caddy liners if a plastic bag or waterproof covering is needed. They are made of cornstarch and biodegradable at the right temperature. So they could be used and possibly burned with no ill effects on a campfire.. though I would be tempted to take them home and reuse them in my food waste caddy as they are not cheap. Anyone have any info on these re burning? I know they are designed for a bio degradation so they might be safe enough to burn tho it would be a waste.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,410
883
63
Florida
I hope that todays 'wax paper' is not some plastic lined paper?
Some wax papers react like the old ones, they go wet from the sliced tomato where it creases, but some ( usually supermarket Deli counter) does not.

BTW: They all are made from white paper that has been coloured Brown, to look more Organic, Oldfashioned and Environmental Friendly....
I’m not sure we’re all on the same page regarding “waxed paper.” What we call “wax paper” here isn’t brown. It relatively thin and the wax makes it translucent.

Ther is a heavy brown paper that’s used to line table tops at messy outdoor food events but I can’t remember what it’s called.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,298
1,391
McBride, BC
Here, that table cover is "Table Cover." Comes in 36" x 100' rolls. We get white.
Fabulous drawing paper for kids on rainy days. And old men planning totem and story poles.

I use Baker's parchement paper, strange stuff. Can be used several times.
I use silicone sheets, quick rinses for dozens and dozens of bakings.

I like to use phyllo pastry for wrapping oven-baked foods. Eat the wrapping. All gone.
From Beef Wellington to Curried Chicken to Apple Logs. Wedges of a wheel of Brie with apricot jam glaze.
Just a hint: once thawed and opened, it won't keep. Use it all up and freeze your baked goods OK.
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,410
883
63
Florida
We buy ours in Norway, it works ( better) for us. Brown.

I have seen ‘parchment’ paper that is white and semi transparent.
We have that, put in oven around some food. Making parcels.
I get parchment paper too. That’s not it.

This is what we call wax paper:
https://www.theartofdoingstuff.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/wax-paper-transfer-8.jpg
It’s the stuff Mama used to wrap my sandwiches in before putting them in the lunchbox when I was in about th third or fourth grade.
 

Keith_Beef

Native
Sep 9, 2003
1,331
237
51
Yvelines, north-west of Paris, France.
We buy ours in Norway, it works ( better) for us. Brown.

I have seen ‘parchment’ paper that is white and semi transparent.
We have that, put in oven around some food. Making parcels.
That is what in France is called "papier sulphurisé", because it is treated with sulphuric acid to cross-link the fibres and make the paper impermeable. It's very similar to what in the UK is called "greaseproof paper" (and I've been using that term in this thread, when I should have been using "papier sulphurisé" or "parchment paper").

There is a difference in the process between the two papers, though they in the end give a very similar result.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
We think the same!

I think the problem is to know what the paper is, and ( for 'wax paper') to know the agent they used to impregnate.
I guess some fossil hydrocarbon wax. So maybe a bit of black, unhealthy smoke?
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,185
2,355
Mid Wales
Have any of you seen the foul chemicals given off by burning pine wood?

I think we can be too 'idealistic' about all of this and would be better off just trying to minimise our waste and polluting activities whilst we wait for technology and business to respond to the demands.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,185
2,355
Mid Wales
Hot smoked or cold smoked? I've had cold smoked over juniper and that was nice. I suspect I'd find hot smoked over most pine a bit acrid - dunno, not tried it :)
 
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