Basic kit hit-list?

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welsh79

New Member
Oct 19, 2021
1
1
42
Wales, UK
Hey everyone

Nice to be here and find that a forum like this exists!

I am new to camping and in a sense, "bushcraft" too, although I really enjoy learning about things like this online.

My question would be what is the best essential starter list of kit I'll need? I was wanting a decent but not extortionately priced 2/3 man tent that's waterproof. Aside from that, what else would you recommend on a reasonable budget?
 
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lostplanet

Full Member
Aug 18, 2005
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Kent
Welcome to the Forum. be prepared for an influx of suggestions. This is a massive field to deal with but fun too and always interesting. By all means stick around here but a search will bring back a huge amount of options to read through from ultralight, ex military, civilian gear, expensive, cheap, tried and tested.

Enjoy.
 

lostplanet

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Aug 18, 2005
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Kent
I would say first off and not necessarily Kit, is to try and get landowners permission for the place you wish to practice Your craft. Take only memories and leave only footprints.

I'm more into Hiking, wild camping than crafting spoons and such. The members classified is a great place to pick up bargains after youv'e done your research.

Footwear is important for me and I try not to skrimp on that.
Decent water carrying bottles easily cleaned and maybe a stainless flask.
Decent ferro rod when you have permission and it is safe to have a fire.

specifics will be down to you depending on your chosen journey and available budget.
 

lostplanet

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Aug 18, 2005
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Kent
+1 Mora if you are of legal age, in the stainless flavour I prefer. Around £10-15 and still my go to.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,377
4,735
Mid Wales
Welcome to the forum :)

Our resident 'kit fanatics' will be along soon I'm sure. However, you'll need to identify what you want to do to start with, then progress. For example, do you fancy participating in a 'static camp' meet up or are you looking to backpack over the hills?

Where in Wales are you? there are meets in South, Mid and North Wales :)
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
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I'd forget the Tent for a bit.

Get a cheap Tarp and you can go a long way with just that and learn a range of Knot related skills making the Tarp into a variety of different shapes.
 

TeeDee

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Nov 6, 2008
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You probably also want to get a nice old boot , just so you can boil some water up in it for a Brew.






( In joke )
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,377
4,735
Mid Wales
Hey everyone

Nice to be here and find that a forum like this exists!

I am new to camping and in a sense, "bushcraft" too, although I really enjoy learning about things like this online.

My question would be what is the best essential starter list of kit I'll need? I was wanting a decent but not extortionately priced 2/3 man tent that's waterproof. Aside from that, what else would you recommend on a reasonable budget?

You'll have to forgive the joking going on - it's not directed at you but reminding everyone how subjective the replies have been in the past; usually diving down a rabbit hole of what knife is best and how you can get away with just a waterproof kilt and a good hat :)

Winter is not the time to start experimenting with minimal kit TBH so, another question, when do you intend to start this adventure?
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
9,479
2,214
McBride, BC
Lay out 3 sheets of paper. Label them FOOD, SHELTER, CLOTHING. Research those topics. You will probably hit on all three at the same time, just make your notes on the appropriate page. As long lists as you like, include your dreams. Sorting out the reality takes a few "shake-down" trips. The duration depends upon what you are prepared to carry.

Lostplanet has an excellent suggestion: Get permission for your three choices of camping spots. One will work out better than the others.

I camped a lot out of vehicles. Everything was packed into labelled wooden boxes. I could pick what I needed in minutes.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,174
1,263
Berlin
Which equipment would be the best choice depends on your age, gender, body height and strength, personal income and the area where you want to use the stuff.

For example: A tarp or a military poncho weighs a fraction of a tent. But if there are no trees to tension it you usually can't make a good shelter from it.
Otherwise it's sensible to save weight if you want to carry your equipment in a rucksack, and to save money, and a tarp or military poncho is far cheaper than a tent in the same quality.

I usually recommend to buy mainly used military surplus equipment in the best available conditions if beginners ask about a low budget equipment, but new boots and a factory new military sleeping bag like Snugpak Special Forces 1 or 2 or both, but if you are very small a Carinthia Tropen and Defence 4 might be the better idea, because also offered in smaller sizes.

A usual male student for example surely will make the best deals if he gets a bit army surplus, a small girl or otherwise less strong person needs to be very careful with the weight of every single item.

A very tall man will not fit in most tents.

So, we really need to know a bit more about you if we are asked to recommend equipment.

Your gender?
Your age?
Your body height?
Your profession?
Strong and sporty or rather not?

Hiking or only static camping?
Are there trees in the area where you want to use the equipment?
Will you use the equipment alone, with a friend or as a couple?
How does the second person look like?

Do you reach a static camp site by car or rather with train, bus and on foot?
 
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punkrockcaveman

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Jan 28, 2017
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yorks
Clothing. Some great walking boots, not that they have to be too expensive, are worth their weight in gold. Merino wool Clothing if you have the money or microfleece stuff on a budget. Wool socks are worth the investment though.

A victorinox huntsman is a very useful tool whilst the blade remains legal carry. Don't forget sharpening gear!

A first aid kit is a must especially if you are carrying a knife

Before you get a tent look into Tarps and Bivi's
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,174
1,263
Berlin
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
8,196
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Exeter
You don't need lots of expensive kit to get INTO bushcraft , although most of us seem to migrate that way over time. Nature of being Human I guess.

Mostly you will need just the access to somewhere to try basic skills out.
Most other things can be found,borrowed,improvised or picked up from Charity shops.

Don't feel you need to blow a big chunk of money on kit you dont necessarily need.

Youtube is free.
Books are free from Library
Numerous articles exist online.

Just giving yourself the time to play & practice is the biggest investment you can make.
 
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Tiley

Full Member
Oct 19, 2006
2,180
252
57
Gloucestershire
I reckon that time is probably the most overlooked piece of 'kit'. Take time to get to know your local area or the area in which you wish to practise bushcraft. Get to know its trees, plants and the cycles of the seasons; then, spend time practising the skills that are central to this addictive activity. The more time you spend honing your skills - as well as your knife! - the better you will become and the more confident you will be. Bits and pieces of gear will come and go but the time you invest in all areas of bushcraft will last you for ever.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,174
1,263
Berlin
I think that the Dutch army Sting rucksack is currently the best low budget allround option, made by Lowe Alpine or Arwy.


Very similar is the Karrimor SF Sabre 45. It's 20 litres smaller than the Sting and a bit too small for winter camping. But nevertheless it's a good recommendation too if you can find it used somewhere.
Even new it is relatively affordable.

 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,174
1,263
Berlin
I find that these little steel mugs / pots, 750 ml with bail and butterfly handles, are very practical and you can find them cheap in the internet.
The size is rather for a tea but it also works for cooking noodles if you buy very small ones.


Later one could also get a similar 1800 ml Pathfinder bush pot, especially if you want to cook also for two persons.


But to be honest, I rather eat bread with salami, hard cheese, nuts-fruit mix and in cold conditions chocolate in the woods.

The whole kitchen stuff you don't need in the beginning.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,174
1,263
Berlin
This knife here is a good very cheap recommendation as a first fix blade knife.

Hultafors GK heavy duty.

 
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