Archery Bow

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,923
3,109
Mid Wales
I only use a selfbow and even then just for the archery equivalent of plinking so I can't advise on any 'modern' style equivalent I'm afraid. However, the one thing I will say is don't go for 'he-man' draw strength. You can have a lot of fun and learn the art with a 30lb bow but if you go straight in at 50lb plus you'll get tired very quickly and then all the rest falls apart. Unless, of course, you are particularly strong and fit in the upper torso in which case just ignore all I've said :)
 

bobnewboy

Settler
Jul 2, 2014
964
391
North West Somerset
I’d suggest getting a basic takedown recurve bow (e.g Quicks TD01 - perhaps 68 inch length / 32lb @28 inch draw weight), and a set of reasonable wooden arrows to begin with. You will also need a tab or glove of some kind, and a bracer to protect your bow forearm. Everything else is gravy on top of that. In order to establish good form, I’d also suggest seeing if a local club is doing any introductory lessons. Perhaps do that before buying any gear to be honest, as then you will get a feel for the sport before you spend too much. As with any sport, it is quite possible to spend a small fortune if you really want to.

I used to be located close to Quicks when I lived in Surrey, and they were quite helpful with free advice and practical help in getting started. They may even do, or know someone who can give you, basic instruction. That might be cheaper or less of a commitment than going along to a local club, initially at least.

Ive only dealt with Merlin via online ordering, but they were fine.
 
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swotty

Space and time
Apr 25, 2009
1,703
101
Somerset
I have a Samick sage take down bow. It's #35 which is great for me but other draw weights are available and swappable which is the good thing. I think #25 is available and might be a good starting weight.
Certainly would recommend it and I think it was about £120 but that was a few years ago.

Sent from Somerset using magic
 
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santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,712
992
64
Florida
Basically I would just echo what’s already been said: start with a simple light draw recurve and get a three fingered archery glove and an arm guard for the other arm.
 
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I concur with bobnewboy: try and get yourself some coaching from a club. You may get to try different bows / styles, e.g. Barebow, Recurve, Compound, etc. And disciplines such as target, field. They'll also help with tuning advice for your bow - when you get it! And start with an easy draw weight until you've got the technique. For example, an afternoon's shooting, 70-80 arrows with a 30lb draw weight means you will have drawn, and held, well over 2,000lbs - over a ton. Plus, it's difficult to develop your technique if you are fighting the bow all the time.

I find archery a very "Zen" thing.
 
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Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,848
1,946
62
Exmoor
Quicks Honiton have a range where you can try out any bows that take your fancy while you are there. Bought my bow there and had a lovely afternoon trying things that took my fancy, and plenty of advice along with it. The guys there are great.
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,365
772
46
Exeter
I only use a selfbow and even then just for the archery equivalent of plinking so I can't advise on any 'modern' style equivalent I'm afraid. However, the one thing I will say is don't go for 'he-man' draw strength. You can have a lot of fun and learn the art with a 30lb bow but if you go straight in at 50lb plus you'll get tired very quickly and then all the rest falls apart. Unless, of course, you are particularly strong and fit in the upper torso in which case just ignore all I've said :)


Agreed - I'd rather learn to dance with the little ladies that I can throw around control rather than the more , mature , madams that require a stiff hand and strong arm. :)
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,365
772
46
Exeter
I concur with bobnewboy: try and get yourself some coaching from a club. You may get to try different bows / styles, e.g. Barebow, Recurve, Compound, etc. And disciplines such as target, field. They'll also help with tuning advice for your bow - when you get it! And start with an easy draw weight until you've got the technique. For example, an afternoon's shooting, 70-80 arrows with a 30lb draw weight means you will have drawn, and held, well over 2,000lbs - over a ton. Plus, it's difficult to develop your technique if you are fighting the bow all the time.

I find archery a very "Zen" thing.


I'm fortunate that there is a Club within spitting distance - I will take lessons. Thank You.
 

Dark Horse Dave

Full Member
Apr 5, 2007
1,698
37
Surrey / South West London
I’d suggest getting a basic takedown recurve bow (e.g Quicks TD01 - perhaps 68 inch length / 32lb @28 inch draw weight), and a set of reasonable wooden arrows to begin with. You will also need a tab or glove of some kind, and a bracer to protect your bow forearm. Everything else is gravy on top of that. In order to establish good form, I’d also suggest seeing if a local club is doing any introductory lessons. Perhaps do that before buying any gear to be honest, as then you will get a feel for the sport before you spend too much. As with any sport, it is quite possible to spend a small fortune if you really want to.

I used to be located close to Quicks when I lived in Surrey, and they were quite helpful with free advice and practical help in getting started. They may even do, or know someone who can give you, basic instruction. That might be cheaper or less of a commitment than going along to a local club, initially at least.

Ive only dealt with Merlin via online ordering, but they were fine.
An aside for Bob: Quicks at Walton has gone!! (Just as Mrs DHD & I are doing our long-delayed induction at Company of 60!) Hope all's well with you
 

bobnewboy

Settler
Jul 2, 2014
964
391
North West Somerset
An aside for Bob: Quicks at Walton has gone!! (Just as Mrs DHD & I are doing our long-delayed induction at Company of 60!) Hope all's well with you
Hi Dave, yes all is good with us, thanks for asking. I hope you and yours are doing well too. Say hello to anyone at Company of Sixty who remembers us :)

That’s a shame about the Quicks at Walton. They were always very helpful and seemed to carry a decent stock. Perhaps you’ll be going to Carole’s shop if you go down the year archery route ?

Cheers, Bob
 
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