Any Finnish speakers ?

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
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McBride, BC
The Haida people's homeland is a big and beautiful island achipelago, off the west coast of British Columbia.
They took the anglo name "Queen Charlotte Islands" and put it in a beautiful bent wood box.
Then they went to our national capital with the box and delivered the name before parliament.
They told the government to shove the anglo name up where the sun never shines. The government said: "OK."
So the Haida explained that their home land is Haida Gwaii. Since then, all maps have been corrected.
 
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Keith_Beef

Native
Sep 9, 2003
1,331
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51
Yvelines, north-west of Paris, France.
I've heard tell a long time ago so facts are hazy that the friesian language can be understood by people somewhere in the north east of England and vice versa. Can anyone verify this?
"Brea, bûter en griene tsiis is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk" == ""Bread, butter and green cheese is good English and good Fris". (Slightly corrected from the Wikipedia article).
 

Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
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Exmoor
"Brea, bûter en griene tsiis is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk" == ""Bread, butter and green cheese is good English and good Fris". (Slightly corrected from the Wikipedia article).
Yes I understood that and I don't even come from the north east uk. Thanks I was not imagining this fact. Isn't language amazing? When I first moved here I had more difficulty understanding some of the old folks who spoke with a broad zummerzet accent than Ihave understanding freesian!
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,395
507
Berlin
That's nice!
:0)

But even in printed German university language it isn't so different!

Brot, Butter und grüner Käse ist gutes Englisch und gutes Friesisch.

As you see, its mainly the different spelling, what causes the problems.

(gut = good, you simply lost the gramar ending -es)
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
But Finnish belongs to the Uralic language family!

Together with Hungarian, the Sami, Estonians and maybe some more?
They have, like everybody else, many borrowed words from the Slavic and Germanic language families.
Vodka for example, is borrowed from Russian.
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,395
507
Berlin
In the twenties of the last century existed in the Ural area several small speaker groups who spoke those languages.

That's probably the area where they all come from.

Because theyr ancestors had been to lazy to settle over to Scandinavia and Estonia or to conquer Hungary I guess, that they had been to lazy to learn a proper Russian too, but I don't know it.

Perhaps it's still spoken, perhaps not.
I have no idea.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Linguists classify both Hungarian and Finnish (and Estonian) into one 'drawer' and claim a common ancestor but I have always wondered why there is a such difference between those people ( Finns and Hungarians) when it comes to appearance, temperament and mentality?

DNA research is fascinating. Most Scandihooligans are a mix of Western hunter Gatherers and Eastern Agriculturalists.
Finns have Eastern Agriculturalists and Far Eastern that the Scandihooligans.
 

Keith_Beef

Native
Sep 9, 2003
1,331
237
51
Yvelines, north-west of Paris, France.
Linguists classify both Hungarian and Finnish (and Estonian) into one 'drawer' and claim a common ancestor but I have always wondered why there is a such difference between those people ( Finns and Hungarians) when it comes to appearance, temperament and mentality?

DNA research is fascinating. Most Scandihooligans are a mix of Western hunter Gatherers and Eastern Agriculturalists.
Finns have Eastern Agriculturalists and Far Eastern that the Scandihooligans.
I seem to remember reading one theory, that some population of horsemen from the steppes of central Asia moved westwards, and that they adopted the language of the local people... In reality, it is more likely that they killed off the local men and took the local women for wives, and quite naturally the children learned mostly the language of their mothers and so over the course of a few generations the invaders' "father" language became more and more diluted into the local "mother" language, while the genetic make-up of the population would not change much after the initial influx of the invaders.

This story might have been about the Bulgars, though, rather than the Magyars.
 

Mattk

Forager
Nov 2, 2007
216
1
68’ North
Finnish is not too bad, I can understand most of what is said to me but it’ll take a few more years yet I rekon before really being able to join conversations properly........

Matt.
 
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