Worksharp guided bench sharpener?

  • Hey Guest, For sale we have Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteel PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information or use the Pay Now button in the sidebar

Slaphead

Member
Nov 6, 2020
38
11
73
Bolton
This is the one which tilts and has guides to help beginners maintain an angle.

However there are two versions on the market.

One has guides of 20 and 17 degrees, and the other 20 and 25 degrees.

The latter is substantially cheaper. I could buy it plus a couple of Moras for the same price as the former.

As a novice I understand that 20 degrees works for most bevels, but I have a Spyderco which I am given to believe would probably be better sharpened at 17 degrees. I would be grateful if somebody could confirm that. And I was wondering which sort of blades one would want a 25 degree bevel for.

The guides can be removed on both versions for sharpening of scandi grinds.

Does it really matter which one I buy. Will either be OK? Or should I buy the more expensive one with the 17 degree angled guide?

Can I simply sharpen a Spyderco Endura at 20 degrees?
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,356
1,330
Bedfordshire
Yes, definitely need to remove guides for Scandi.

It would appear to me that the 20/17 and 20/25 degree refer to the angle per side. I based this by finding this video on Youtube, pausing at 1:42 and holding my clear precision protractor up against my screen ;)

Mora with a 2.5mm thick blade and a bevel that is about 6.5mm tall, gives a total edge angle of about 23deg.

I wouldn't want to use any of their guides for sharpening any of my knives, I don't really want anything more than 30 deg total, the 17 degree side is already at the steep side for me. I think though that you could make a wedge shaped shim to allow a shallower angle, stick it to the 20 with tape, so you could use the cheaper stone and make it work for you.
 
Last edited:

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,356
1,330
Bedfordshire
Spyderco's sharpener uses 30deg total angle and 40. They say the 40 is only there for the average knife user who is liable to damage a finer edge, or is just wanting a general utility edge.

You can start to get wood cutting performance at 30deg and less.

So, those guides won't make much difference, as you say, you will be removing them.
 
Last edited:

Slaphead

Member
Nov 6, 2020
38
11
73
Bolton
Many thanks for your replies.

The Worksharp gets pretty good reviews and is affordable.

I suppose you are right. I could remove the guides and replace them with some sort of diy guide contraption.

Or I could just remove them and learn to guess it. And learn how to sharpen by feel as everybody else does.

Thanks again.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mark Baigent

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,356
1,330
Bedfordshire
That was why I suggested a Hultafors, rather than a Mora. They are cheaper. Just start sharpening having already made peace with the idea that you will destroy this cheap bit of plastic and steal...and that will be okay ;) I very much doubt that you will destroy anything, but it helps loosen up if you are working with tools you have decided do not matter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Erbswurst

Slaphead

Member
Nov 6, 2020
38
11
73
Bolton
Thanks.

I've already taken your advice and ordered a Hultafors, plus two Mora companions, one in stainless and the other in carbon.

They will probably turn out to be the only fixed blade knives I ever need.

Now I will order the sharpener.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,503
965
Berlin
And why don't you simply order a portable DC4 and learn free hand sharpening?

That is the skill a bushcrafter needs.

Next skill would be to do it with a flat stone you found on the ground.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,356
1,330
Bedfordshire
And why don't you simply order a portable DC4 and learn free hand sharpening?

That is the skill a bushcrafter needs.

Next skill would be to do it with a flat stone you found on the ground.
DC4 or my preference of CC4, yes.

Flat stone on the ground...no. Whenever I see this stated as a thing that "bushcrafters" do, or that you should be able to do with a knife for it to be a "bushcraft" knife I feel like this. :banghead2: Since it has been discussed at length, and I know that no one has changed my mind, or the mind of anyone else who thinks it is at least poorly thought out, any more than anyone who really thinks its a good idea and isn't just parroting someone else has changed their mind...lets just leave the advice that you can try, but don't be too worried about the results, and don't start on a really nice knife.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Erbswurst

Slaphead

Member
Nov 6, 2020
38
11
73
Bolton
Thanks for the advice, but, as a starter, I would feel more comfortable starting with something raised up a bit and bigger than the DC4.

My immediate needs are not for something portable for use in the bush.

Later I will consider the likes of the DC4.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Erbswurst

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,503
965
Berlin
Your thoughts are right, but in my opinion you can also get immediatly the DC4 and put it on a whet cloth on the edge of your kitchen table.
As I wrote before, sharpening a knife is pretty easy like this.

I recommend to save the money to invest it in other equipment.
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,655
730
Canada
I would be inclined to buy benchstones ... Japanese or whatever.

In the end, it is good to experiment and learn to feel where 17 degrees, 20 degrees, 25degrees, 30 degrees etc falls on the pad of your thumb when it is on the spine of the blade whilst you are sharpening. It is weirdly intuitive, and will become a physical memory. Rather than degrees, think in terms of fine edge, medium edge, and steep edge. You can't really go wrong, so long as you keep the spine of the blade on the same spot on your thumb. The knife will sharpen, just maybe it will take a few goes to work out how to get the specific particular angle you are after.

17 degrees and below is more for the kitchen and you'd need a fine steel that could take and hold the edge without undue distress. 30 degrees is near as damn it an axe. With a ton of material behind the edge you could likely whack it through most things.

If you are going to be knifey, it is also going to be worth learning to convex. But there is a mountain of info and advice on this, so I'll shut up other than to say try and get hold of some micromesh, relatively coarse for reshaping edges and some finer stuff for tuning the blade right to where you want it.
 
Last edited:

Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.