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Forest fella

Full Member
Jul 2, 2008
2,232
78
Gloucestershire
My kit cover's most scenario's of Survival whether in the woods or in a Locked room.
I use a SUMA Tin for my ''Survival kit'' with some added E & E item's.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,807
2,983
Mid Wales
My kit cover's most scenario's of Survival whether in the woods or in a Locked room.
I use a SUMA Tin for my ''Survival kit'' with some added E & E item's.
Large or Small? - I wouldn't call the large one a pocket-sized survival kit :)
In fact, the small one is pretty large!
 

Forest fella

Full Member
Jul 2, 2008
2,232
78
Gloucestershire
It's the Small? / Medium Tin, But it's better to ''have it & Not need it'' than the Other way round.
Plus it's a Great Mess tin, Yes there not cheap but you get what you pay for, if you just want to pick afew little oddies out of your kit I would agree it's not the most pocket friendly tin to fit in a pair of jeans, But I think it's worth having a kit you can live from in my opinion.
Cheer's
 

Forest fella

Full Member
Jul 2, 2008
2,232
78
Gloucestershire
Yes mate that's the 1 I use, plus smaller Altoids style 1's on afew Survival knife sheath's, Plus av a look at some of my Sale's Threads and you will see some of the Kit's I've put together and Sold.
 

ToddG

Full Member
Nov 4, 2008
21
12
Boston, MA USA
So I have gone with a more complete system. I do most of my hiking in New England USA but this has served me well in the UK and New Zealand. This is from a post I wrote for a website over here.

The one thing people ask about the most is the canteen cup. As long as I have a metal cup and can make fire....safe water


Layers, It’s not just for clothes



If you spend any time involved in outdoor pursuits you have heard about the importance of dressing in layers; Base/undergarments, mid/shirts and pants, outer/coat, rainwear, etc. It’s an efficient and flexible way to dress. If you get too cold, put on a layer, if you get to warm, take one off. Depending on the weather you can even add or remove the layers you take with you. Summer? Light mid layer and maybe some rain gear in your pack. Winter in New England? Wicking base, heave mid and heavy outer layer. Plus maybe an extra down puffy coat in your pack.

Well, I started thinking that what is good for clothes is good for survival gear. It’s important to have gear on hand to make the acquisition of at least the big three; fire, water, shelter, a little easier. To that, add psychological comfort and something to help affect rescue and you have a tidy little pile of gear. I am going to speak about what I carry. Everyone has their own personal preferences and habits regarding what they carry into the field so feel free to substitute your bits of kit for mine.

Lets start with a list of the gear then break it down into the layers. Remember, this is survival gear and things that just live in your pack. I am not including things like tents, sleeping bags, stoves and food.

Knife

Whistle

PSK*

Firestarter/matches/lighter

Gloves/bandana

Proper clothes

Tarp/emergency blanket

First aid kit

Headlamp/Flashlight

Water bottle

Canteen

Canteen cup

Para-cord

Extra clothes/rain gear

*PSK contents: Para Cord Wrap, Electrical Tape, Ranger Band, Signal Mirror, Compass, Photon Light, Condom, Needle/Thread, Spark Light, 3-tinder, Snare Wire 3ft, Duct Tape, Steri Strips, Fishing Line, 2-hooks, 2-water purification Tabs, Alcohol wipes, 1-knuckle band, 2-standard band aids, 1-piece paper, Pencil, Razor Blade



Here is how I break it up most of the time:

Layer one (On your person)

Knife

Whistle

Compass

PSK

Firestarter/matches/lighter

Gloves/bandana

Proper clothes



Layer two (In your pack)

Tarp/emergency blanket

First aid kit

Headlamp/Flashlight

Water bottle

Canteen

Canteen cup

Para-cord

Extra clothes/rain gear



The Layer two gear lives in my pack. Depending on the length of time I plan to be out I have a couple of different packs, this gear gets moved from pack to pack and can be added to radically with the trip and the time of the year. a lot of additions in winter when the margin of error is small, less in summer when things are a little friendlier. I also find that if I am heading out with a group that is new to the field I may add extra gear to cover what they may miss.

The Layer one gear is always on my person. This stuff really does not change from trip to trip. Its my “don't leave home without it gear” and is designed to help me with fire, water and shelter even if i am seperated from my pack for some reason.

My wife and I walk frequently in a small patch of woods near our home, if you walk in a straight line in any given direction for less about an hour you will hit a road or a house. Most people that walk here carry nothing with them. Since I seem to be incapable of heading into even the gentlest wood without some gear the layering system works out great for me. All my layer one gear is in my pockets and out of sight. I carry a small shoulder bag or daypack with a water bottle and a first aid kit. If we are heading out for a longer hike, say New Hampshire's Mt Monadnock, I carry the same Layer one load out but add my full Layer two kit to my pack and off we go! That gives me everything we may need to spend the night out in a pinch.

Layering works for your clothes and your gear, taken a step farther Layer three could be hunting gear, fishing gear or backpacking supplies. Layer up and be safe!
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,365
769
46
Exeter
I appreciate the detailed post and its solid good thinking - layering your equipment and kit makes sense.

But to bring the thread back to being on point is there anything or product that you've found you've swapped out or upgraded due to technological or commercial availability?

As an example - Titan Survivor Cord is an all singing , all dancing Paracord alternative.


 
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ToddG

Full Member
Nov 4, 2008
21
12
Boston, MA USA
I appreciate the detailed post and its solid good thinking - layering your equipment and kit makes sense.

But to bring the thread back to being on point is there anything or product that you've found you've swapped out or upgraded due to technological or commercial availability?

As an example - Titan Survivor Cord is an all singing , all dancing Paracord alternative.

Sorry for the digression....got excited:)

A lot of times these days I swap out the paracord out in favor or bank line (Catahoula Tarred, Braided Nylon Twine https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00Q76IWEC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_q-PvFbGFRPWHX)
I can carry more and it’s great for repairs and shelter construction.

I single packaged water purification tabs but often use a small (breathdrop) squeeze bottle of household bleach instead
And I always include a mini-bic lighter
 
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TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
6,365
769
46
Exeter
Sorry for the digression....got excited:)

A lot of times these days I swap out the paracord out in favor or bank line (Catahoula Tarred, Braided Nylon Twine https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00Q76IWEC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_q-PvFbGFRPWHX)
I can carry more and it’s great for repairs and shelter construction.

I single packaged water purification tabs but often use a small (breathdrop) squeeze bottle of household bleach instead
And I always include a mini-bic lighter
No need to apologise - this was at least related to the general gist of the thread.

Whats a One-Knuckle Band by the way???


AND a Spark Light ???
 
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ToddG

Full Member
Nov 4, 2008
21
12
Boston, MA USA
Bingo, I carry one:)

spark light is awesome, is a stand alone or kit fire staring device in metal or plastic. I think is a US Airforce original
Spark-Lite SL3-OD Military Edition Fire Starter and Tinder Quik https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005HTFJGE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_9pQvFbQ6AXGC8

or

UST Micro Spark Wheel Fire Starter with Adjustable Tension Spring and Compact, Waterproof Storage Tube Great for Camping, Backpacking, Hunting Emergencies and Outdoor Survival https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FVZ4IE8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_SqQvFbKGJTXZF

if you have any fluffy tinder it’s great. And will work one handed if you find yourself unable to use 2
 
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Jared

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Sep 8, 2005
2,557
114
47
Wales
Nasco Whirl-Pak 1l bags for water.
Oral re-hydration tablets/sachets instead of the bouillon cubes.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,676
1,629
McBride, BC
I have more than a dozen Bic butane lighters scattered all over my kit.
They have their place for lighting fires and as I learned, is really awkward.
Then, I discovered Coghlan's "Hurricane matches".
Wooden boxes. Heads are maybe 3/4" long and once lit, the wind does not put them out.
Very easy to stuff a lit match into a tinder pile. 12 boxes to a case here.
 

Bishop

Full Member
Jan 25, 2014
1,541
479
Inside the wire, Llanelli
Scale of included items may also be worth considering as any survival kit is only intended to get you home, not help you stay away for months. Seeing a lot of good small combo steels with a ferrocium rod embedded into magnesium that are far smaller than the "traditional" US army issue magnesium block. Failing that whilst we all know and love the Poundland disposable lighters, BIC do make an even shorter miniature version. Either option would free up a bit more space inside for something extra.
 
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TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,076
427
Vantaa, Finland
I have replaced all other bandaids with Micropore tape, I usually carry both 10 mm and 25 mm versions. Can be used as trad bandaid but you can let it stay for days as it breaths. I usually tape my heels if going for a long walk, there also one can leave it on for days, it just wears off, add some more. There is a slick porous film version but that does not conform to shape as well.
 
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