Something a little different.

  • Hey Guest, We've had to cancel our 2020 Summer BushMoot PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information.

Wayland

Hárbarðr


A few weeks ago I enjoyed an Old School camp with Riam and a few other friends and one thing that caught my eye on the side of his living van was a bargework style painted lantern which I thought was very interesting.



Well, following the completion of our new studio workshop I thought I would christen my new workbench by having a go myself.



Starting with a pair of Fuerhand Baby 276 lanterns which are galvanised and then powder coated, giving me a good rubust surface to work on I did some basic lining work with enamel paints.



Added the base layers for the roses.



The petals were 5 simple brush strokes per rose and the leaves just two or three strokes.



Then some fine brush line work to finish the stamens and leaf veins.



Then put the lantern back together for the finishing touches.

All done bar a coat of lacquer.
 

Wayland

Hárbarðr
There was a traditional art style used on the canals, widely referred to as Roses and Castles. It seems to have arisen from the painted china-ware of the period, which makes sense because pottery was often transported by narrow boat to reduce breakages. ( The roads were very poor at the time and decent suspension an optional extra. )

The roses I have used are based very heavily on that style and the border decorations are consistent too.
 

Wayland

Hárbarðr
As so often with historical work, context is important.

Imagine piloting a coal barge through the Black Country and your only retreat is a cramped cabin below decks.

Your "window" is a painted landscape with a castle and your "garden" is filled with painted roses. Yes, it is gaudy by modern tastes but for the bargemen it might be the only beauty they got to see from day to day.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,361
594
Lancashire
Out of curiosity, did this camping style happen for you as a conscious style from the beginning or did you realise you already had a lot and decided to go completely that way?

I can imagine someone having a mix of camping equipment styles but tending towards cotton canvas tents, brass lights and real fire hearth equipment. Then a conscious decision to create it as a complete style.

Off topic but curious.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wayland

Wayland

Hárbarðr
Out of curiosity, did this camping style happen for you as a conscious style from the beginning or did you realise you already had a lot and decided to go completely that way?

I can imagine someone having a mix of camping equipment styles but tending towards cotton canvas tents, brass lights and real fire hearth equipment. Then a conscious decision to create it as a complete style.

Off topic but curious.
Good question.

I've been knocking around living history encampments for years but that avenue has been closed down for me as my eyesight is failing so I was looking for another direction to take.

My bushcraft kit already had an old school style to it and we certainly had a lot of historical stuff that we were able to utilise for the camps.

The Steampunk idea appealed because it wasn't restricted by any kind of historical authenticity and allowed for an eclectic mix of kit so I think it was more a matter of going with the flow and embracing the eccentricity of it all.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Snufkin and Janne

Wayland

Hárbarðr


Having almost completed that job and thoroughly enjoying the process, I turned my attention towards what else could I paint up like this.

Riam had given me a small table lamp which was in need of some TLC it was painted in a light blueish grey colour but much of the paint was flaking off. I had also acquired a small "nursery" lamp in a turquoisey blue that I thought might adapt well.

I gave them both a rub down and wire brushing to remove the loose paint and provide a stable surface to work on and painted them black.

When dry, I started with some simple border colour and a few strokes to pair them up.

More to follow...
 
Last edited:

Wayland

Hárbarðr


I decided to experiment with some different flowers on these to expand my repertoire as it were.

Other blooms in Anne Young's book were daisies and six petalled blue flowers which she described as “like forget me nots” (which only have 5 petals)

I thought I would give them both a try on these lamps.

Starting from round yellow centres, the blue flowers have six circular petals surrounding and a bit of shading on the yellow centre while the daisies are a little more complicated.

Here you can see I’ve just prepared the centres and swags for them.
 
Last edited: