Solo wild camping

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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,708
637
Berlin
In the winter the evenings are long and it is very long dark.
That really could become boring.

But: You have time to think about something.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,262
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
You just listen to those big, hungry creatures with huge fangs that are tip toeing around you in the dark, just outside the reach of the fire light.....
You do hear the sift rustling sound of the leaves they step on...
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,672
1,629
McBride, BC
I'd really enjoy solo camping without a worry in the world about apex carnivorous predators.
Australia was like that. Sure = snakes and spiders and bull ants of course, but not some
700 kg bas.tard busting up the camp.

I live in the edge of empty wilderness. See for yourself. Big stuff that will try to kill me.
I always go armed until maybe the middle of November. Depends on the snow storms.

Erbwurst, you forget the fundamentals of hibernation.
The local grizzly bears and black bears go to bed. You don't need to care.
Bears are very common here and in the village, a damn nuisance.
It's only the 100kg silent cats that we need to care about after dark. We protect our children.

Sunset on the solstice, behind the west range, is 1:52PM for my house.
The coyotes and wolves bark up some noise some nights, all winter long. Big deal.
I wish they would shut the hell up and go to sleep.
The lynx and bobcats probably nip in to the village for a cat or a small dog or two or three.

Janne: you are such a sloppy romantic. All the same, we have the local environment very well lit to go out after dark.
Lots of dogs here. No need for big ones just those sensitive to changes in their immediate environment.
I suppose I'd shoot any beast busting through my front door. I don't ever want to have to hunt for the keys to the trigger locks.
 
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mousey

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 15, 2010
2,210
253
39
NE Scotland
I really enjoy solo camps, you can do what you want where you want, eat when you want, stop / start when you want. You don't have to worry about anyone else and how they are feeling. Plus in my youth no one I knew would want to come [or I'd prefer not to spend that much time with them.... I'm very happy with my own company]. As long as you have everything with you and enough food for a couple of days there's no real need to worry about even being lost in the majority of the UK, within a days walk there's a road or pub or farm house or something.

These days I only get out through scouts / cubs, or I have one or two of my own kids with me, so nice peaceful solo camps don't happen :)

Take some photos and tell us of your adventures [I keep on telling everyone else to do that so I can live vicariously, although hypocritically as I'm very bad at documenting my trips]
 

Tiley

Full Member
Oct 19, 2006
2,051
156
56
Gloucestershire
To my mind, solo camping represents the ultimate freedom. You pitch up where you want in the wilds, though preferably with a view, and can just enjoy the quiet and solitude which, in an increasingly busy and frenetic world, is something of a luxury. I don't get bored as I always have something to read and try to keep a journal of the day's activities or the journey I've made. So, after my supper, that's what I do - read and write - and probably plan a little for the following day.

I have been scared once in the Brecon Beacons. I was in my bivvy bag on a col to the west of Pen y Fan and was just dropping off to sleep when I became aware of some regular, heavy breathing nearby. I wasn't fully conscious and so my mind played tricks on me about what it might be. The sound and what made it got closer. I shrunk deeper into my sleeping bag, hoping it would go away. It didn't. I groped for my headtorch, turned it on and flung open my bivvy bag. The cow was probably more afraid than I was and lumbered off quickly into the swirling wet darkness.

Solo camping is something that I really love doing and helps me appreciate the luxuries of home when I return.
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,708
637
Berlin
Sorry, I always forget, that you lazy guys didn't clean up your countries!

;0)

In France, Britain and Germany our ancestors simply have thrown that ******* bears, cats, wolves and elephants on the barbeque, where they belong to!

;0)
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,262
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I just remember two really scary moments ( real danger) I have experienced.
One was when I was in my teens, and me and dad did a three month touring holiday around Europe, camping ( in forests and so) all the time, learning about his family.
We were in Bavaria. Tent up in a nice woodland. We were woken up at daybreak by a lot of noise all around the tent. Dad whispered to me - do not move, do not make any sound, wild boar.
They disappeared after a while, and he explained as they were all around us, they could have attacked us to protect the young.

The second time was my and my now wife's first holiday together. Driving and sightseeing in Europe. In Hungary, we just placed our underlays and bags on the ground, and went to sleep. Again, woke up at day break, visibility not much.
Again, a flock of boar was all around us. I had to really gently whisper to her to be quiet.
They heard us, but did not much.
We saw them rooting around, playing, everything.
Interesting if we were not sh#t scared.

After that she refused to sleep outside, so B&B's and small hotels for the rest of the trip!

Once I received my first hand gun permit age 17, I always wore it when I was spending time in the Swedish nature, alone or with her.
I felt safer.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,262
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I think I would expire from that experience.....
I love watching wildlife, but from a certain distance.

I would never, ever camp solo in Africa.
Everything there is wild and wants either to kill you, to eat you, or both....

Everything!

I did camp in Sahara, but we were a group and had tents. Plus we had a good supply of wine and beer.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,672
1,629
McBride, BC
I have had Wombats dig up my tent pegs in the night.
I have had Black bears stick their fuzzy heads into my tent in the mornings.
Camping solo or in a group would have made no difference.

Can you buy capsiacane Bear Spray in the UK?
That will clear your campsite whole you search for another.
I have some, sleeve holsters and all. Never carry it because it's a bear attractant.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,262
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
No sprays allowed, CS, pepper, tear.

But you can get them over the counter in several countries in Europe.
Germany and Czech Republic have a good selection of 'full strength' spray cans.

Beans on Toast has the same effect though!
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,672
1,629
McBride, BC
Erbswurst: You got it bass-akwards = the wildlife was here first. We are the intruders and the destructors of natural habitat.
This place should be big enough to sustain us all. There is very little human history here, much more on the coast.

It is not our intention to create extinctions as a tribute to Man's conquest of the environment. We're above that.

Bears on the deck, deer on the front doorstep, a cougar hiding near the local library. Life's like that.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,672
1,629
McBride, BC
The Peterson Field Guide to Animal Tracks (Series #9) is affectionately refered to as the "Book of Turds."
Very interesting means of identifying animals and their diets. Best left for field identification as the scats
may be territorial markers. I'm sure that you all know what earthworm castings look like already.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,262
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Earthworms make a sound too.
A kind of scratching.
I am not joking. You need a very, very still morning or evening, need to lie with the ear close to ground and not move.
You move a tiny bit = worm hurries away deep.

Having had my hearing damaged from prolific handgun use, I had to borrow dad's stethoscope.
Today I am happy to hear a seagull flying past my head.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,672
1,629
McBride, BC
In the district of Gippsland in Victoria, Australia, there are giant earthworms.
Annelids to be sure. Maybe 1" diameter and 48" in length. Like a segmented grey snake.
There's a species specific zoo for them on display. I've been through it with my kids.
They make noises in their tunnels just like a flushing toilet. So do my kids.

Can you imagine?
A cold night with pounding rain and one of those things trying to get into the tent with you?
 

Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
2,823
1,922
62
Exmoor
I don't like to go totally alone but don't like to be right next to someone else either.no tent sharing for sure. It's nice to be with someone else for company especially in the evening. Sharing food chores and some homemade beaverages makes a trip more fun. I remember hitching round France pal and I got benighted in the carmarge. Couldn't understand why our lift dropped us off and then told us not to camp. No more lifts materialise and it's getting a bit dimsy so we find a bush to pitch tent behind, cook some grub and go to sleep. Middle of night woken up with lots of snuffle and grunt about the tent. Penny drops. Wild boar!!!! Almost wet ourselves ! Thank goodness we left food outside the tent. We had to set off with no breakfast as it was all in the little piggies tums. Terrified at the time but makes a good campfire tale 30 yrs later.
 
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