My first carving.

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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
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McBride, BC
I think the tradition is to carve kuksa from birch burl with all the tangled and twisted grain.
That just might be a wood form which is really hard to source outside of Sammi country.

Thinking of the carving process, a kuksa is a really deep spoon with a really short handle.
My greatest concern would be to carve one which is accidentally too small to be useful.

And before I forget: well done on the spoon and fork. The fork in particular is rarely ever seen here.
I watch and wait for examples.
 

Leo Seven

Member
May 23, 2020
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Bulgaria. Sofia
www.youtube.com
I think the tradition is to carve kuksa from birch burl with all the tangled and twisted grain.
That just might be a wood form which is really hard to source outside of Sammi country.

Thinking of the carving process, a kuksa is a really deep spoon with a really short handle.
My greatest concern would be to carve one which is accidentally too small to be useful.

And before I forget: well done on the spoon and fork. The fork in particular is rarely ever seen here.
I watch and wait for examples.
Thank you for your coment about a fork and a spoon. Thank yiu for watching.
As far as i donot have any relevant tool for carving a kuksa. So i am searching another way how to do it.
And also I have a project of building a log cabin (small house) without nails. You can watch it:
 

Robson Valley

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Nov 24, 2014
8,677
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McBride, BC
Another technique to remove most of the wood inside a kuksa is to drill it out then break away the rest of the wood.
Can you see here in the start of this big dish, I used a 18mm Forstner bit to drill away much of the wood then break
the rest of it. Next, do another layer, down and down.
Dish 04.jpgDish 06.JPG
 
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Leo Seven

Member
May 23, 2020
16
18
29
Bulgaria. Sofia
www.youtube.com
Another technique to remove most of the wood inside a kuksa is to drill it out then break away the rest of the wood.
Can you see here in the start of this big dish, I used a 18mm Forstner bit to drill away much of the wood then break
the rest of it. Next, do another layer, down and down.
View attachment 59434View attachment 59435
Yes. It is a good idea. I think I will make a kuksa this way. Thank you.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,677
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McBride, BC
A good wood carving tool for you is the crooked knife used by farriers to trim and clean horse's hooves before attaching new iron shoes. After many sharpenings, the knife is too narrow to be used so our farrier throws them in a box. I buy them 6 at a time and revise the bevels to 12 degrees for wood carving.
My picture file is too big to post. Sorry.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,677
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McBride, BC
OK. Let me try this again.
The pair of farrier's knives on the left are Mora #171 Equus (Sweden) .

Next is a pair of new Hall (Canada) farrier's knives which cost me$50.00 each.

The knife on the far right is a Hall that has been worn away by sharpening.
I give the farrier $5.00 each for those. I change the bevel from 25 degrees to 12 degrees.
There is still a lifetime of good carving steel in the worn one.
The hooked tip is excellent for working where the side of a kuksa would meet the bottom.
FarrierAs.JPG
 

Leo Seven

Member
May 23, 2020
16
18
29
Bulgaria. Sofia
www.youtube.com
OK. Let me try this again.
The pair of farrier's knives on the left are Mora #171 Equus (Sweden) .

Next is a pair of new Hall (Canada) farrier's knives which cost me$50.00 each.

The knife on the far right is a Hall that has been worn away by sharpening.
I give the farrier $5.00 each for those. I change the bevel from 25 degrees to 12 degrees.
There is still a lifetime of good carving steel in the worn one.
The hooked tip is excellent for working where the side of a kuksa would meet the bottom.
View attachment 59436
Yes. I think I understood. I have to find something like that. But here, where I live, 50$ is mmmmm... Alot...
I don't want to cause pity...
But spent these money for a kuksa.. Not now.
I have to find some for 5$.
But I know that I want a perfect one.
And as an artist I want to make a kuksa with some pattern. And for this I need a good tools, my friend. I hope i will make one soon.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,677
1,629
McBride, BC
The worn-down Hall knives are better than new.
The blade is so much narrower, you can carve around a much shorter radius inside any dish.
The new knives can't be used that way.

The farrier has been a friend for 20 years.
I feel I should give him a little money even for his old tools.

Anyway, look around. Farrier's knives are really good wood carving tools.