Military Connections?

Military Connections in Bushcraft

  • Ex/current services and proud of the contribution wartime experiences have made to bush lore

    Votes: 178 31.6%
  • Never served, but take great interest in the information and useful kit available from the military

    Votes: 217 38.5%
  • Acknowledge a connection but try to avoid 'looking military'

    Votes: 103 18.3%
  • Think bushcraft should be distanced from the military wherever possible

    Votes: 65 11.5%

  • Total voters
    563

hertsboy

Forager
May 16, 2009
160
0
Watford, Hertfordshire
Never been in the military myself - worse luck!!!!

My dad was in the RAF - WWII, wireless operater in a Lancaster Bomber squadron - survived
Grandad in the South Wales Borderers - 3rd Afghan War 1919 - survived
his great unclie was in the same regiment, then called the 42nd I believe - died at Isandlwhana 1879

on my mum's side of the family, several of her grandad's brothers served in the Austrian Army and fought on the "other side" in WWI. I believe they all survived, although they may well not have survived WWII, as they were Jewish. Mum's grandad, who came to this country around 1900, was intered on the Isle of Man in WWI, but he was freed on the request of the Bishop of St David's on the basis that he was needed to make translations of Hebrew texts ..which he wasn't really! Thanks Bish!

My greatest respect to all those who risk their lives in the services, and especially those who made the ultimate sacrifice, no matter what side they fought on!

I don't particularly go in for looking miliary, though - don't wear camo clothing nor use military equipment, although my tarp is a dpm pattern.

I do a lot of backpacking and wild camping in the hills, and I've often been asked if I'm the army, even though I'm 55 years old and have grey hair (an not a lot of it!).

Tickles me pink when this happens, and makes me not a little proud!
 
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Psy23

Guest
considering how meany people have lost there lives this year in Afghanistan please show some respect..
I concur. I'd have said 2001 was a much bloodier year, especially for the burning Afghan children in their bombed out homes?

Afghan Casualty Figures... 2001 - present

British Military Casualties = 245

Afghan Civilian Casualties = (est.) 30,000 (including indirect deaths from starvation etc)

Shall we do Iraq next? Perhaps you'd like me to post casualty lists for all the countries in which the British military has been active in the past 100 years in order to spell out to you the shame you should feel for joining such a disgusting organisation.

Respect? I respect the sanctity of human life...

If you think I'm a troll for being against organised mass murder then more fool you.
 
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Sam442

Member
Oct 17, 2009
19
0
Bristol/Salisbury
Perhaps you'd like me to post casualty lists for all the countries in which the British military has been active in the past 100 years in order to spell out to you the shame you should feel for joining such a disgusting organisation.
Location: The Woods, East Sussex
Such as the conflicts that meant you're able to live in a free country?
 

lannyman8

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jan 18, 2009
4,005
2
Dark side of the Moon
if you had been to Afghanistan in the roll i have maybe i would understand and respect your comments psy23. but as im polite i respect them any way and wish you well and hope none of your friends lose there limbs of life.

happy new year to all and keep up the good worl lads of the forces........
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,475
1,596
S. Lanarkshire
Nine pages of comments on a very old thread, and one young man who has ideals of one version of social justice sets it on it's head :rolleyes:

Psy23, Bushcraft is a broad church, but there's no avoiding the fact that many of those involved have feelings and determined viewpoints every bit as strongly held as yours.

Your responses were a rant again the military, they did not answer the OP. Indeed they were diametrically opposed to his question.

To re-iterate, Shep asked,

Military Connections?

A lot of people use military kit and some probably got their interest in bushcraft after military service. I thought it would be interesting to see how strong the connection is.
This is not an 'are you for or against the army in general' question. I don't want to offend anyone, or start getting political.



Please confine answers on this thread in line with the OP's question. Everyone's compliance, and courtesy, would be appreciated.

cheers,
Toddy
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,475
1,596
S. Lanarkshire
You didn't rock anymore than anyone else :)

In light of the contentious turn that the thread took though, I would ask that folks keep to the question, please.
I would also appreciate it if it was remembered that the status quo is, " no politics, no religion", within our discussions.

Everyone's understanding of this would be considerate :cool:

cheers,
Toddy
 
My dad was in the RAF - WWII, wireless operater in a Lancaster Bomber squadron - survived
Grandad in the South Wales Borderers - 3rd Afghan War 1919 - survived
his great unclie was in the same regiment, then called the 42nd I believe - died at Isandlwhana 1879
Just to bring your illustrious family military history up to full accuracy Hertsboy:

The South Wales Borderers were the 24th Regiment of foot in 1879 (not the 42nd) and were indeed massacred at Isandlwhana in 1879 - save for one Company (commanded by a Royal Engineers Officer) who conducted the heroic defense at Rorkes Drift a couple of days later.

Oh! - I'm still in and still using some of the firm's kit in my down time.

Fin
 

njc110381

Forager
Jun 17, 2008
103
6
Gloucester, UK
I've never been in the military and have no real military family background. I enjoy bushcraft for the peace it offers rather than wanting to get involved in hostile situations.

I'm not so sure the military have a lot to offer bushcraft. Bushcraft on the other hand has served many soldiers very well and allowed them to survive in situations where they otherwise would have died.

I use some military kit. I don't like DPM much and if I can avoid it I do. I prefer olive green kit. Military stuff is often well made and cheap, it would be foolish not to make use of it.
 

tytek

Forager
Dec 25, 2009
235
0
Leeds
After I completed my electrical aprenticeship I got laid off. I thought my world was collapsing around me and seriously considered joining up for a bit of stability.
Having a trade qualification I would have no doubt been welcomed with open arms.

I often wonder where and what I could have done if I had joined.
What stopped me? To be honest I don't know - probably the Missus.
 

Retired Member southey

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jun 4, 2006
11,098
1
your house!
Just thought i'd add a bit to my other post, my Mum's been doing a bit of digging into her Father my Nandad's history and turned up some great history, i'm currently trying to get more info on his service. where it mentions that he was taken as a P.O.W he was firstly held somewhere in northan Italy, escaped just before the German army took over the camp made it all the way to Calais, recaptured and then sent a camp in Germany. cool as a box of ice.


I cant wait to read his service record if it comes back, the LRDG stuff is interesting, but I was amazed that he had worked in Canada as a cow poke.
 

jackcbr

Native
Sep 25, 2008
1,561
0
46
Gatwick, UK
www.pickleimages.co.uk
Did I serve, no. It was something that I considered many times, but I kept asking myself could I pull the trigger. Sadly I always think I couldn't. I'm just not that brave, and yes I did say brave. You have got to be seriously brave to put your life on the line day in and day out knowing that one day you might have to, well, you know.

The humanitarian side of the work the services has always appealed to me. I've seen what other members of my family have done - all RN.

As for the kit, well I do have a bit, Bergen mainly - it was big enough for my needs, but more importantly - cheap. Out of preference when I'm out walking I like to be visible, just in case someone needs to find me I'll stand out a bit. As for when I'm in the woods, it is nice to blend in so most of my stuff is green. I try to avoid the cammo stuff. Not that I'm against looking millitary, in fact most of my adult life I've been taken for a member of the services. But I don't want to be wrongly associated and give them a bad name. My bushcraft skills still aren't that good.

In a nutshell, if it's fit for purpose, tried and tested and in my price range, I'll use it. Military or not.
 

jackcbr

Native
Sep 25, 2008
1,561
0
46
Gatwick, UK
www.pickleimages.co.uk
Did I serve, no. It was something that I considered many times, but I kept asking myself could I pull the trigger. Sadly I always think I couldn't. I'm just not that brave, and yes I did say brave. You have got to be seriously brave to put your life on the line day in and day out knowing that one day you might have to, well, you know.

The humanitarian side of the work the services has always appealed to me. I've seen what other members of my family have done - all RN.

As for the kit, well I do have a bit, Bergen mainly - it was big enough for my needs, but more importantly - cheap. Out of preference when I'm out walking I like to be visible, just in case someone needs to find me I'll stand out a bit. As for when I'm in the woods, it is nice to blend in so most of my stuff is green. I try to avoid the cammo stuff. Not that I'm against looking millitary, in fact most of my adult life I've been taken for a member of the services. But I don't want to be wrongly associated and give them a bad name. My bushcraft skills still aren't that good.

In a nutshell, if it's fit for purpose, tried and tested and in my price range, I'll use it. Military or not.
 

johnboy

New Member
Oct 2, 2003
2,259
2
Hamilton NZ
www.facebook.com
Just thought i'd add a bit to my other post, my Mum's been doing a bit of digging into her Father my Nandad's history and turned up some great history, i'm currently trying to get more info on his service. where it mentions that he was taken as a P.O.W he was firstly held somewhere in northan Italy, escaped just before the German army took over the camp made it all the way to Calais, recaptured and then sent a camp in Germany. cool as a box of ice.


I cant wait to read his service record if it comes back, the LRDG stuff is interesting, but I was amazed that he had worked in Canada as a cow poke.
Southey,

His service record as detailed above is really interesting without the LRDG connection..
Drop me a PM...

Cheers

John
 

santaman2000

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Jan 15, 2011
16,387
875
63
Florida
A lot of people use military kit and some probably got their interest in bushcraft after military service. I thought it would be interesting to see how strong the connection is.
This is not an 'are you for or against the army in general' question. I don't want to offend anyone, or start getting political.
I know I'm resurecting an ancient thread but I just stumbled on it.

Served 21+ years in the USAF and proud of every minute. Family history as far back as WWI but TBH I don't know much about my family earlier than my grandparents.

I have and use quite a bit of both military and civilian gear Some of it's od green and other bits are camo (for that matter a good bit of my civilain gear is camo; although a different pattern)
 

Ed Edwards

Full Member
Dec 17, 2012
380
0
Kent/London
I've just come to the end of my Military Service. Getting used to being called Mr instead of Sergeant....

My interest in Bushcraft was definitely born from those nights on exercise and those months on Op's. I always felt the level of support we enjoyed in the Military negated the need for many 'survival' skills, which was always a bit of a disappointment.

I completed 16 years (of my 30 year contract), but was injured in 2009. 3 years of rehab followed and I'm no longer required. Bushcraft has certainly enabled me to keep 'Green' to some extent, although I'm not physically capable of much.

I've always been a tinkerer and had a love of the outdoors, so I'd have ended up doing Bushcraft anyway I'd imagine.

I don't use much of my old Military kit at all. Most of my normal kit, assault vest etc is (IMHO) unsuited to civilian bushcraft use, although I can perhaps see a use for PLCE Webbing, but just not for me.
 

Bumbler

New Member
Feb 22, 2013
256
0
Norway
www.bushcraft.no
Did my national service in the Norwegian Army. They trained me as a Tactical communications spec...a glorious name for the dude that pick up the phone while sitting in a BW on some mountain top. This was back in 1989.
In 1994 I joined up again as a volunteer from the reserves for our Infantry batalion in the Lebanon. They put me in as driver/ radio operator to the batalion DCO. Spent six months on deplyment in South Lebanon, and 2 days after coming home was a civillian again.
1996 did another 6 months on deployment in Lebanon, fixing phone lines.
2000 same same, this time in Kosovo. But they made the mistake of putting me in an infantry platoon this time. But gvae me 3 months in Norway to get in shape and learn whatever an infantry soldier is supposed to do. In the field I got to carry the NO/PRC 1066 radio and batteries, and say "Wait, out" into the mic while I fetched my Lt. so that he could speak in it while we ran around trying in vain to stop Albanians from beating up Serbs and burning their houses...

So thats my military career summed up....well...it gave me some bushcrafty experience. Spent 120 days in winter in a tent in the mountains around Bardufoss, and I know what to do when I get soaked trough and hypthermia starts to rear it's ugly head, so I got something out of it :)