Lighting a fire in difficult conditions - Norwegian highlands

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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,279
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
You are a Genius, Sir!

Not just a tinder source. But be careful. It burns quite fiercely and the flames are not always equally visible.

I just stuffed one into my nose, when I had a pretty bad nosebleed after someone released a branch into my face. Looks stupid, but it does what it is designed to do. :)
You can unroll it, using it as wadding over a bleeding wound, held in place with some tape too. Ot when soaked as a cooling pad over a minor burn. Makes things just a bit less uncomfortable that way.
 

Laurentius

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Aug 13, 2009
2,049
327
Knowhere
Another thing that is handy is melting a candle down into a tin stuffed with rolled up cardboard, once lit it keeps on burning and so can be used to light a bigger fire. set it under a pyramid of small sticks and you are good to go.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,279
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Another brilliant idea!
I used to do that, but placed a match that acted as a wick. Cardboard is better.

You guys should do a separate thread with those ideas. "Sticky" thread. No comments, just the ways.
 

RonW

Native
Nov 29, 2010
1,575
120
Dalarna Sweden
You are a Genius, Sir!

Nope, not a genius. Just using my brain. Common sense it's called, I think.

True Laurentius, but such a tin in a decent size, does add to the weight carried.
And is only useable as intended. Very little room to "manoeuvre" if you know what I mean
But a very good idea nonetheless. I made several such emergency candles/heaters with scraps; empty tuna fish cans, cardboards and leftover candles.
 

gonzo_the_great

Forager
Nov 17, 2014
203
48
Poole, Dorset. UK
If you have vaseline based lip balm, you can mush a little into the cotton wool, to act as a little fuel.
I've also used some of the alcohol based hand cleaner in a similar way. (Though test it before you need it, else you may have just wetted your only tinder, if the alcohol content is too low.)

A tea-light candle can be good to help dry out some damp kindling. Place it against a bit of a support, to give some protection from draughts and to keep the kindling above the flame. And allow the heat from the flame to precolate through the bundle. May take a little while, but can work.

We used to make the rolled up cardboard/wax candles, in boot polish tins, as kids. They certainly burned hot.
 

vestlenning

Settler
Feb 12, 2015
721
76
Western Norway
Making a fire with your backpack full of useful stuff is not a problem, doing it with simple means/what's on site might be - hightech vs bushcraft to put it another way.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,279
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Making a fire with your backpack full of useful stuff is not a problem, doing it with simple means/what's on site might be - hightech vs bushcraft to put it another way.

You mean - rubbing two sticks together?

Even Flint/steel is having usefull stuff.
Using a Firesteel (Ferrocerium) and steel (knife) is a very modern way to light a fire.
 

Laurentius

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Aug 13, 2009
2,049
327
Knowhere
You mean - rubbing two sticks together?

Even Flint/steel is having usefull stuff.
Using a Firesteel (Ferrocerium) and steel (knife) is a very modern way to light a fire.

Everyone here has a different and individual idea of what "bushcraft" means to them, and that runs a gamut from prepping, to homesteading, to camping, all the way through to glamping.

Who is not going to enjoy a modern innovation when it is available? I am sure the first people who started to rub two sticks together found that an improvement on carrying embers around from camp to camp.

It is horses for courses. What were once every day skills using every day tools become historical interest for enthusiasts only. I am of that age when firelighting was something I did in the fireplace with coal, kindling, yesterdays newspapers and matches.

It is good to be able to make fire in a variety of ways, and certainly making feathersticks and setting a fire right is good, however when you just want to get warm in the pouring rain, you are going to use whatever is quick and dirty and available, and being prepared with a few tricks is all part of that.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,279
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Absolutely, agree!

But to call using certain methods 'hightech' and others 'bushcrafting' ?

The high-tech way is using a ferro rod. Unless somebody invents a laser lighter of course.




Everyone here has a different and individual idea of what "bushcraft" means to them, and that runs a gamut from prepping, to homesteading, to camping, all the way through to glamping.

Who is not going to enjoy a modern innovation when it is available? I am sure the first people who started to rub two sticks together found that an improvement on carrying embers around from camp to camp.

It is horses for courses. What were once every day skills using every day tools become historical interest for enthusiasts only. I am of that age when firelighting was something I did in the fireplace with coal, kindling, yesterdays newspapers and matches.

It is good to be able to make fire in a variety of ways, and certainly making feathersticks and setting a fire right is good, however when you just want to get warm in the pouring rain, you are going to use whatever is quick and dirty and available, and being prepared with a few tricks is all part of that.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
9,278
2,079
McBride, BC
There's a body of knowledge to laying and lighting fires under any circumstances.
To me, there's a satisfaction in being able to select what I need to use to have a camp fire.
The most ancient of Paleo methods intrigue me. Have yet to master the bow drill.
 

vestlenning

Settler
Feb 12, 2015
721
76
Western Norway
You mean - rubbing two sticks together?

Even Flint/steel is having usefull stuff.
Using a Firesteel (Ferrocerium) and steel (knife) is a very modern way to light a fire.

Funny guy! I'll try again: Starting a fire isn't hard if you bring petrol or similar but is it bushcraft?
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,279
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Funny guy! I'll try again: Starting a fire isn't hard if you bring petrol or similar but is it bushcraft?

Only if you find nafta or petroleum seeping from the ground, then it is bushcraft! :)

I reacted about your post about having stuff in the backpack. As the discussion was about Ängsull, tampons, poured wax and so on, I thougt you meant these fire aids as not bush craft but high tech.

Sorry if I misunderstood you!
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,279
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
The problem is what we see as the definition of 'bushcraft'.

The interested person will for sure go back to ancient tech, to learn, to try and to use. It is all good to do it under ideal circumstanses, but when the fecal matter hits the fan it is good to have a backup that works in sunshine, rain or storm.

Life insurance.
 
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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
9,278
2,079
McBride, BC
Canadian railroad flares burn for exactly 10 minutes. Once lit, you can't extinguish them in a bucket of water.
I carry 3 in the Suburban (in case I happen across accidents or wildlife collisions) and a 4th one in my day pack.
I can make fire when I need one.

It's a lot of fun to mess with fire, the paleo methods, but there's been times when I needed the fire (or flares) very quickly.
 

RonW

Native
Nov 29, 2010
1,575
120
Dalarna Sweden
This sin't a discussion on what is bushcraft and what is not.
This post is meant as a instigator to learn the basics. Mastering them and you can light a fire almost everywhere.

If you don't mind carrying the weight, I suggest one of these...... although technically maybe not completely legal.
They come in all sorts and shapes; from 14-18 vintage to modern, from weighing a tonne to light weight.... each to his own.
b6a2a461145dd46b83efd3e1139eaa43.jpg
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
6,617
1,561
Bedfordshire
That picture is kinda worrying, someone really wanted that vintage kit to function :lmao:. I am amused by the attempt to make the BernzoMatic propane torch blend in!

I am pretty sure that Ray Mears demonstrated the use of rubber inner tube for lighting fires in jungle conditions. No one asks whether using a saw, axe or knife is "real bushcraft" because they are products of the modern world, so lets not get too tied up with fire lighting methods. :) Understanding the interplay between one's skills, the conditions and environment and one's equipment is an important part of the skill set for safe wilderness travel.

My time in Norway taught me that birches twigs don't make the good fine kindling that they do in England. The dang things would rot while they stood there, and all the fine branches just fell off.
 

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