into the wild

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philipb

Forager
Feb 20, 2016
197
0
wales
into-the-wild-670x448.jpg


I stumbled onto this film and became very intrigued by the story. I guess it is only fascinating because it is a bit of a mystery. but my instinct tells my the reality of the story is much more mundane and much of the romance is just in the imagination of the writer. or am I just a cynic
 

Suwarrow

Member
Jul 7, 2016
40
0
London
I'd highly recommended the book on which the film was based.

Also his sister has given an interesting TED talk.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

daveO

Full Member
Jun 22, 2009
1,404
464
South Wales
Agreed, the book gives a much more balanced view although it is still a story pieced together from scraps of evidence glued together with opinion and speculation. It takes the shine off the film story quite a lot but gives a more accurate portrayal of the man. I think the film did a good job though.
 

starsailor

feisty celt
I haven't read the book, but have seen the film. I took it at face value; I don't know the truth/s behind the story, but I enjoyed the film and cried at the end. I've kept the DVD and would watch it again, something I rarely do with a film. Mundane doesn't make money or names, I suppose.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,280
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
A good yarn about an idiot that should have stayed in the city.

Everything he did was a disaster in waiting.
I saw the film, read the book.

Sorry if I am horribly blunt.
 
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Ivanhoe

Forager
Aug 28, 2011
169
26
Sweden
A good yarn about an idiot that should have stayed in the city.

Everything he did was a disaster in waiting.
I saw the film, read the book.

Sorry if I am horribly blunt.


200.gif


That's why I never read threads here.

And why I very seldom post here at bushcraft.uk.


:confused:
 

Alan 13~7

Settler
Oct 2, 2014
572
5
Prestwick, Scotland
I haven't read the book, but have seen the film. I took it at face value; I don't know the truth/s behind the story, but I enjoyed the film and cried at the end. I've kept the DVD and would watch it again, something I rarely do with a film. Mundane doesn't make money or names, I suppose.

same for me almost word for word, I saw this on telly I was just about to go to bed when it came on, started watching & was moved to tears also.
 

artschool

Forager
Sep 14, 2014
111
1
chester
Alaskan Park Ranger Peter Christian wrote:

When you consider McCandless from my perspective, you quickly see that what he did wasn't even particularly daring, just stupid, tragic, and inconsiderate. First off, he spent very little time learning how to actually live in the wild. He arrived at the Stampede Trail without even a map of the area. If he [had] had a good map he could have walked out of his predicament [...] Essentially, Chris McCandless committed suicide.[31]
 

daveO

Full Member
Jun 22, 2009
1,404
464
South Wales
The really interesting thing about McCandless is how dismissive most people are of what he did and yet his story is still being discussed and analysed 25 years after he died. You don't hear much about all the people who died climbing everest fully prepared and fully equipped but McCandless is almost the equivalent of those people who have to be airlifted off Snowdon every year wearing trainers and a T-shirt in the snow. We seem to love the tragic fail stories like this, '127 Hours' is another good example.
 

Highbinder

Full Member
Jul 11, 2010
1,257
2
Under a tree
Not sure where that's coming from. Janne's opinion of Supertramp is widely held, including by myself. The character appeals to young adults who see the romance and adventure and disregard the mental illness, his wrecklessness and lack of fore planning. He is not, in my opinion, a good role model.

200.gif


That's why I never read threads here.

And why I very seldom post here at bushcraft.uk.


:confused:
 

BillyBlade

Settler
Jul 27, 2011
748
2
Lanarkshire
The true backstory when you research it as I did some years ago is that of a spoilt, arrogant and deeply immature young man who thought he knew better than every expert and paid the price.

However, some good photogenics and a Hollywood smile combined with some romantic notion of wealthy city boy turns nomad and well, here we are.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,280
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
When his body was found, he weighted 30 kilos (60 pounds) which means he starved for many months before he died.
Of course, being this emancipated means your brain does not work properly.
It also means he was starving before he went into the wild.

Anyway, RIP.
 
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Tansi/Wadjii

It happens up here too. 3 people a couple of them English. Come here, think they can live on the the Barrens, the land we call the place of the little sticks because the trees are so small. We've passed their graves several times. They starved to death within their first winter. took another couple of winters before their bodies could be taken away. http://www.davidpelly.com/John Hornby.pdf
 
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JamPan

Forager
Jun 8, 2017
245
1
Yorkshire
Joe,

That looks like the same area as the book:

People of the Deer by Farley Mowat about the decline of the Ihalmiut.
I think if the Ihalmiut couldn't survive, then a bunch of Englishmen don't have much chance.

Is this your area with all the caribou?
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,280
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I wonder how much the lack of Vit C and other nutrients influenced their health and death?

Joe, what did your people do in the old days for vegetables and fruit? Dried?
 
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