How cold is it when wild camping this time of year?

Big G

New Member
Jul 3, 2015
3,144
0
Cleveland UK
Weather can be quite fickle this time of year.

Best to be prepared ie extra warm clothing and good insulation above and below you.
 

decorum

Full Member
May 2, 2007
5,064
10
Warwickshire
Interesting info about the heat loss!
Thanks.
But if you are in a nice warm s-bag, it is the head that is exposed, so the old ideas still make sense.

It's only getting cold because it's the exposed bit ~ if you go in head first with no socks on you'd get cold feet instead :p :rofl:
 

oldtimer

Full Member
Make sure you do not go to bed hungry, especially if you have been exerting yourselves.

I have good kit and years of experience at sleeping out below zero, but have sometimes been cold when tired and hungry.

Also remember that it is important not to get wet. Wet cold is worse than dry cold.

Remember, it is easier to stay dry than to get dry.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,706
1,643
McBride, BC
If at all possible, avoid camping in the valley bottom. Cold air drainage is a simple physical fact while afternoon hillside updrafts might be common.
Get up the hillsides as best you can. The view is usually better, too.
Sunset. October. A thousand feet above the Fraser River can be 5C warmer than at my house in the village.
 
Put dry clothes/longjohns on to go to bed. In the morning remove dry wear and put your day clothes on, which may or may not be damp. Good tip in an earlier post about having warm feet in bed; makes a huge difference in getting to sleep. Also don't let yourselves get cold before getting in your sleeping bags.

It's a lot easier if you get all your admin/cooking/eating/clearing up/tidying away done while it's still light, rather than faffing around in the dark with a head torch.

A pee bottle is also a good thing to have in the tent at night. Saves losing body heat using the outside "convenience" during the night. A little bit awkward when sharing a tent with one's daughter I completely agree. There are female equivalents but this aspect of "comfort breaks" may not be appropriate in the shared circumstances of your planned trip.

Enjoy it, and let us know how you get on...
 

dean4442

Full Member
Nov 11, 2004
536
2
Wokingham UK
Further to Oldtimers tip about not going to bed hungry, try a couple of handfuls of raisins and peanuts before bed this always seems to make me warm and toasty.
Colin
 

shindig

Tenderfoot
Dec 30, 2013
65
1
Scotland
My kit consists of an exped downmat 7 which is rated to -24c and a 2-3 season down sleeping bag plus liner. I'm always cosy with this and I camp at 600ft above sea level in Aberdeenshire. I have to agree with what other have said. Sleeping bag comfort ratings are about 5c out, or maybe I just sleep cold.

My mate came along camping with a supermarket inflatable mattress and almost got hypothermia. He had a very bad camping experience and has since bought a decent sleeping mat.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,706
1,643
McBride, BC
Alcohol is a vasodilator. Sure might be a wonderful taste sliding down but, your caloric body heat loss from subcutaneous blood increases.
I'll say that it's OK in spring/summer/autumn but not after a day chopping ice steps.