First aid kit

  • Hey Guest, We've had to cancel our 2020 Summer BushMoot PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information.
I may be wrong however my job keeps me bang up to date with all things first aid and to the best of my belief it is still illegal outside the emergency services ie Air Ambulance, Paramedics, hospital A&E Units, and the military to use this stuff.
Sorry Sniper, that’s not correct. Illegality doesn’t venture into it however they way to keep yourself safe is to only practice what you have been taught.

I dont mean banned as in you cant buy it, I mean banned as in hospitals and ambulance services have ordered their employees not to use it. I cant use it even if I wanted to and I do hold a professional registration.
Depends on your Trust I suppose however the IHCD FPOS – Int. course (Updated protocols and manual May 2010) includes the use of tourniquet to control catastrophic bleeds and at basic level has also updated its ABC’s to C ABC, the initial check in the Primary Survey at that level being for Catastrophic Bleeding before Airway.

My concern …snip…. is that civilians will emulate soldiers and military medics and use them without training, skill or knowledge as a first option, rather than a last option
I totally and utterly agree 100% with that sentiment. It is blatantly obvious by way of some of the equipment being touted as “must haves” in first aid kits on here and some of the techniques being discussed such as self-stitching of wounds that some, not all, people are living in a dangerous fantasy land.

Craig
 

bushblade

Nomad
Jul 5, 2003
367
1
43
West Yorkshire
www.bushblade.co.uk
Hi folks, I've updated the kit and I've been using this slightly different one for a while now, so thought I would post here. I've adopted the transpore tape suggested in this thread and have to say I'm very impressed with it.
I've also included the FFD in the pictures this time :11doh:








  1. 1 pack of 5 gauze swabs 7.5cmx7.5cm. - Cleaning wound site, applying medications, padding dressings.
  2. 2 pantiliners - Blood absorbing compress for wounds prior to dressing.
  3. 1 Opsite Flexigrid - waterproof breathable film dressing ideal for burns and grazes.
  4. Dressings pack:-
    3 large compeed blister dressings
    2 small compeed blister dressings
    Elestoplast cut to size fabric strips x 3
    2 packs of steri strips
    3 elestoplast waterproof dressings
    3 Melolin 5cmx5cm pads.
  5. Cotton buds (Q tips) - applying medications, aids in removing foreign body from the eye.
  6. 10ml syringe with 18g needle stored inside - wound irrigation using clean water/iodine solution.
  7. 4 x Savlon antiseptic wipes - cleaning of minor wounds and hands.
    8 x Alcohol swabs - cleaning of tools prior to blister draining/ splinter removal, cleaning of skin prior to blister dressing.
  8. Fixings:-
    5cm wide flat packed roll of Transpore tape by 3m - Securing dressings, improvised butterfly sutures, blister prevention (over hot spots), stays put when wet.
    3.5cm wide roll of Metolius brand finger tape (zinc oxide tape) - Securing dressings, strapping of sprains and strains.
    Mr Bump cohesive bandage 5cm wide - securing dressings, strapping of sprains and strains, reusable, good when frequent dressing changes are needed.
  9. Medications:-
    2 x Benadryl Acrivastine capsules - allergy relief.
    8 x Ibuprofen 200mg - Pain relief, anti inflammatory, can be taken with Paracetemol for additional pain relief.
    8 x Paracetemol 500mg - Pain relief, fever reduction.
    6 x Caffeine 50mg - Pain relief, temporary relief of tiredness.

  10. Povidone Iodine (10% available iodine) in 10ml droper/application bottle - antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal, mixed with clean water for wound irrigation (approx 10 drops per cup of clean water), water purifaction (8-16 drops per 1litre).
  11. Friars Balsam (tincture of benzoin) in 5ml dropper/application bottle - topical antiseptic dressing for minor wounds and mouth ulcers, topical adhesive for dressings and steri strips, add a few drops to hot water and inhale as a decongestant.
  12. Victorinox classic and safety pin - scissors, tweezers, toothpick, nail file, small blade.
  13. 1 pair nitrile gloves - can also be used as improvised mouth to mouth barrier.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Darryl of Sussex

aus bushcrafter

New Member
Jun 12, 2010
39
0
australia
well thought out kit mate. a bit off topic but thinking of wound dressings i know for a fact that you can use tampons to stop bleeding if you or some one else has received a gun shot wound. not useful rely to bushcrafters buy i thought it might be a interesting fact.
 
Jan 2, 2011
4
0
Scotland
Hi all, new guy here :)

As a trained first aider, I thought I would just say you have a good, compact, well put together first aid kit! you have it so well organised that should someone else need to use your kit, they would be able to do so with ease.

Again good kit! I'll maybe post mine soon :cool:
 

aus bushcrafter

New Member
Jun 12, 2010
39
0
australia
is the uk first aid training levels the same as aus? in aus we have Emergency First Aid (also known as Workplace Level 1), Apply First Aid (also known as Senior First Aid or Workplace Level 2), Occupational First Aid (also known as Workplace Level 3) and other miscellaneous. my one just ran out :(
 

Genty

Tenderfoot
We have First Aid at Work which is a 3 day course, approved by the Health & Safety Executive ( HSE ) - this sounds like your Occupation First Aid/Workplace Level 3 - and the Emergency First Aid at Work which is a lesser, 1 day course. What level of training you need and how many first aiders at each level depends on your level of risk. The HSE have a useful 'ready reconner' to advise on this:

Here

Outside of the workplace there are 101 courses from almost as many awarding bodies. Whilst they may be sold to different markets or presented differently there is some similiarity between all of them: Some offer very short 4 hr courses which is just Unconscious person and CPR. They all offer a '1 Day' course and a more involved '2 Day' course. These are typically called Basic or Emergency courses (although some call the 1 Day 'Basic' and the 2 Day 'Emergency'...and vise versa so forget about the names just worry about the number of days the course is.

Some providers or awarding bodies offer Advanced courses and these do differ quite a bit in terms of content and intended market.


So.. No prescribed uniformity or continuity between providers/awarding bodies but you will find introductory a 1/2 day, 1 Day or 2 Day course being offered by them all.

The 3 Day course is the only one recognised by the Health & Safety Executive in the Workplace. At this stage there is very little between any provider.

On advance courses you should look to a provider which specialises in your interest.

Hope this makes sense.


Getting back OT. Here is my perspective on First Aid Kits. Comments welcome.
 
Last edited:

Realbark

Aimless Wanderer
Jan 18, 2011
354
0
South Lincs UK
I have one of these http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Medium-First-...ealth_Beauty_First_Aid_ET&hash=item53e59b2aa7 to which i have added an eye dressing, paracetomol, piriton (anti-histamine), alka seltzer, diacalm, changed the tweezers for some steel ones, leather needles and cotton, micropore tape, antiseptic cream and a plastic bag (for burns) and a medical torniquet (sharp stuff we play with). I carry a duplicate on my motorbike.
 

plastic-ninja

Full Member
Jan 11, 2011
1,701
63
cumbria
[QUOTE some of the techniques being discussed such as self-stitching of wounds that some, not all, people are living in a dangerous fantasy land.

Craig[/QUOTE]
I can testify to that one!Self-stitched my right leg 20 years ago after a slip with a sharp knife.Obviously I made a hash of it but did close the wound.Cleaned and dressed it when I got home but it went septic real quick and A&E visit followed with wound reopened and cleaned properly and antibiotics.Apparently I could have easily done lasting damage to the leg even if I'd survived the septicaemia.It hurt like a b****ard as well.I now carry butterfly sutures and steristrips!
Simon
 

daryl

Tenderfoot
Aug 4, 2005
88
0
41
Worthing West Sussex
Bushblade

Just a suggestion, from personal experience (use around 10 pairs a day) it would be worth having at least three nitrile gloves, preferably two pairs, the reason for this being that I tend to find that if ive only got one pair to hand (excuse the pun) i usually end up tearing one of the gloves.

Nitrile are tough, however when they tear they end up pretty much disintegrating, leaving you with one unprotected hand. If your really eager to use universal precautions when dealing with someone else, which i would thoroughly reccomend then keep more than one pair with you.

daryl
 

TeeDee

Full Member
Nov 6, 2008
5,768
515
46
Exeter
Bushblade , thanks for the Update.

I realise that this is YOUR FAK and so , tailored for your needs and anticipations of probable accidents without going overkill on weight and size.

From a thread on this Forum which nearly resulted in a death from a Horsefly Bite , and as several qualified medical people seem to be contributing to this thread can I ask what peoples opinions are in ref to carrying an Epipen?? Is it OTT ? Too difficult to understand ( for the average layman ) possible causes that would require Epipen use??
 

Genty

Tenderfoot
You can't simply go out an buy an Epi-pen as it is a POM - Prescription Only Medicine. You would need to get one prescribed from your GP. I you do have a particular sensitivity and your GP deems it appropriate, stress you work in remote environments. Epi-pens do not 'cure' some one of an anaphylactic reaction, only suppress the reaction. After 15-20mins expect the adrenaline to wear off and the symptoms will continue to worsen. Are you going to get an ambulance to you in 15-20 mins.

Carrying an Epi-pen 'just in case' is not advisable. While a person is allowed to administer an Epi-pen to anyone they believe is having an anaphylactic reaction (even it if it is neither the pen of the first aider or the casualty) it is not legal to carry a POM with the intention of administering it.

If you are taking groups out into the woods it really is the individuals responsibility to a) inform you of their condition and b) carry their own medication.


Ref scissors: A pair of Tuff Cut shears are always with me when working. For more delicate tasks ask your pharmacist if they have 'blunt/sharp' scissors. These a re nurses scissors which have one sharp point (useful for peircing packaging etc.) and one blunt point (this is the edge you slide under clothing or dressings when cutting around a casualty without cutting the casualty!)
 

bushblade

Nomad
Jul 5, 2003
367
1
43
West Yorkshire
www.bushblade.co.uk
Bushblade

Just a suggestion, from personal experience (use around 10 pairs a day) it would be worth having at least three nitrile gloves, preferably two pairs, the reason for this being that I tend to find that if ive only got one pair to hand (excuse the pun) i usually end up tearing one of the gloves.

Nitrile are tough, however when they tear they end up pretty much disintegrating, leaving you with one unprotected hand. If your really eager to use universal precautions when dealing with someone else, which i would thoroughly reccomend then keep more than one pair with you.

daryl
Hi, thanks for the advice. It's tempting to add one more of this, or one more of that, but then it would soon get too big an easily go beyond my intended use. The pair I included are the thick heavy duty type. I use the same gloves almost daily in the workshop and have found them to be very durable.
I have other larger kits intended for group use and I do stock multiple pairs in those.
This is just a personal first aid kit, and it is impossible to fill it with items for every possible situation encountered.
Sometimes **** happens, you deal with it as best you can with what's available and the best knowledge and training available to you.
 

Martyn

New Member
Aug 7, 2003
5,252
31
54
staffordshire
www.britishblades.com
...The pair I included are the thick heavy duty type.
That's a good point. Not all nitrile gloves are the same. Those found in hospitals are very thin and friable, but they are made to be a thin as possible to allow the palpation of veins and wotnot (...and hospital gloves are probably also the cheapest you can get). I have used nitrile gloves from B&Q and found them to be much thicker and more durable. Not so good for putting in IV lines, but ideal for a general duty outdoor first aid kit.
 
Last edited: