Everest 2019

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Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,378
1,449
McBride, BC
Might be a seasonal business? Selling clean water at Everest Base Camp?
We could brand it :" Unknown Mountaineer."

Some people are "peak-baggers," no two ways about it.

I always preferred the "long walks" on big hills with some lazy time in camps.
Poke around, explore the site, move on. I eat too much.
Made a game out of cleaning up.
 

Tiley

Full Member
Oct 19, 2006
2,033
147
56
Gloucestershire
Thankfully, I'm of the 'pre-selfie' generation so, when I take out my camera - and yes, I do still use a 35mm Rollei for a lot of shots - or my 'phone, I point it at the scenery and capture it as it is. When the film is processed and I get my prints (remember them?) back, I enjoy the imperfect but unaltered images; when I come to review the shots on my 'phone, I never tweak them or alter them because, if I did, I would be altering the day and the memory of it.

I haven't yet worked out how to take a 'selfie' on my 'phone and, frankly, am not vain enough to do so. People hardly ever feature in my photos because the scenery speaks more loudly and persuasively to me; images of grinning loons blocking a beautiful view do not appeal on any level, I'm afraid!

In response to other posts, yes, the mountains in the U.K. are stunning. I am lucky enough to own a cottage in Sutherland. My local hill is Suilven, a stunning, imposing piece of Torridonian sandstone. Locally, there is also Quinag, Canisp, Cul Mor, Cul Beag, The Fiddler... All are stunning, challenging hills in an environment that is, as yet, not too badly tainted with the detritus of less thoughtful travellers. Why go abroad, when such treasures are right here, on your doorstep? Well, I suppose it is the challenge of scale, of altitude and sustained steepness that appeal, as does the amazing rich culture of the countries you visit. Even so, Scotland and Wales are countries steeped in history and tradition that is every bit as alluring and interesting as countries farther away.

Go local - and enjoy the Selkirk bannock!
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,791
1,264
62
Pembrokeshire
There is no finer mountain day in Wales than North Ridge Tryfan, jump between Adam and Eve, South Ridge Tryfan, Bristly Ridge, The Cantilever, Glyders Fach and Fawr, Devils Kitchen, and back to the start :)
A serious scambly trip on a par with(or better than) stuff I have done in the Alps, the Drakensberg Mountains and Cederberg Wilderness... I have avoided Everest so far...
 
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Tiley

Full Member
Oct 19, 2006
2,033
147
56
Gloucestershire
There is no finer mountain day in Wales than North Ridge Tryfan, jump between Adam and Eve, South Ridge Tryfan, Bristly Ridge, The Cantilever, Glyders Fach and Fawr, Devils Kitchen, and back to the start :)
A serious scambly trip on a par with(or better than) stuff I have done in the Alps, the Drakensberg Mountains and Cederberg Wilderness... I have avoided Everest so far...
That is a very bright jewel in the Welsh mountain crown. I still rate my favourite - and not so much 'better' as 'different' from what the Glyderau offer - as the Z'mutt Ridge on the Matterhorn: a quiet, stunning mixed route on an iconic mountain; the only thing to mar it is the nightmare-ish descent of the Hornli Ridge: so many people, kicking down so many rocks...
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,365
2,556
Mid Wales
There is no finer mountain day in Wales than North Ridge Tryfan, jump between Adam and Eve, South Ridge Tryfan, Bristly Ridge, The Cantilever, Glyders Fach and Fawr, Devils Kitchen, and back to the start :)
A serious scambly trip on a par with(or better than) stuff I have done in the Alps, the Drakensberg Mountains and Cederberg Wilderness... I have avoided Everest so far...
My only concern John is that if we keep telling people too many will go up :)
 

rich d2

Tenderfoot
Jan 10, 2019
55
23
47
Nottingham
Much as I love the welsh hills and the lakes, in all honesty they don’t compare to the experience in the alps or Pyrenees (just my opinion) Big mountains have a different feel, size and exposure. Being on glaciers as well as larger faces is for me a completely different experience. I was never good enough or rich enough to go further than European mountains but I’m sure going over 7000 must be an astounding experience.
So guys and gals what would your favorite mountain that you’ve been on be?
 

rich d2

Tenderfoot
Jan 10, 2019
55
23
47
Nottingham
Mine in the UK would be red like above buttermere in the lakes, especially when it’s winter and the tarn has frozen, if you skim stones across it the ice reverberates and you get an echo from the natural rock amphitheater.
Further away would be vignemale in the French Pyrenees, a proper north face if you’re good enough, a couple of great refugees near by and a couple of glaciers in stunning and relatively quiet countryside
 

petrochemicals

Full Member
Jul 30, 2012
3,532
217
westmidlands
Much as I love the welsh hills and the lakes, in all honesty they don’t compare to the experience in the alps or Pyrenees (just my opinion) Big mountains have a different feel, size and exposure. Being on glaciers as well as larger faces is for me a completely different experience. I was never good enough or rich enough to go further than European mountains but I’m sure going over 7000 must be an astounding experience.
So guys and gals what would your favorite mountain that you’ve been on be?
Give me the central massif over the alps anyday, nice navigatable scenery in the most, nice canyons, ex volcanos just like snowdon and arthurs seat. Mountains also are over rated in there height, denaili or mckinley is the highest from valley to peak in the world, everest may be highest but most of Tibet is a flat plain at 5000+ metres. Everest gives you one thing, a view of a very many large peaks, like the rockies, alps.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,378
1,449
McBride, BC
Did Bogong at night in winter in Victoria, Australia. Fantastic moon-shine for chopping steps in the ice.
Was the night that the Americans first landed on the moon. We stopped to watch.
Quite a view over the Bogong high plains the next morning to the Cleve Cole hut.

Top peak near my house might go 9,000'. Mt Robson is an hour east at 12,950'.
I'd rather be bird hunting than peak bagging.
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,869
456
47
Wiltshire
You need a mountain with a good view.

Snaefell on the Isle of Man is fantastic. You can see the whole island laid out at your feet, plus England, Wales, Ireland and Scotland upon the Horizon.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Here, I need to go up to the top floor on the excellent Kimpton Hotel. Or have a window seat on the babord side of the bA flight.
A good view of Cayman.

Not much to see here, to be frank.
I Norway, I will be able to see into three fjords once everything is finished.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,378
1,449
McBride, BC
Very kind of those guys to risk themselves ( and a pile of money) to bring those bodies down from Nanda Devi.
The sherpas brought a couple of bodies down from Everest, now in the morgue in Kathmandu.
No ID. Nobody knows who they are or when they died. 250+ more up there.