Black currant query

DocG

Full Member
Dec 20, 2013
732
51
Moray
I found a wonderful supply of black currants near the coast this morning. As I merrily foraged along the path, I found two forms of currant on the bushes as illustrated in the attached pictures.
I have tasted both types and both taste equally pleasant. My concern is that one is covered with a grey blush or mould. Is this In any way a hazard? (Yes, with hindsight perhaps I should have asked before I ate it) I think it's a form of what might be yeast or similar. If anyone can confirm that it is yeast do they also happen to know how I might harvest it so that I can use it in cooking? I may be over stretching a point here but I believe that early peoples managed to acquire yeast from such plants. If that's rubbish I'm quite happy to find out. ATBIMG_4214.JPGIMG_4215.JPG
 

bobnewboy

Settler
Jul 2, 2014
965
391
North West Somerset
I've not seen that blush on fruit from our bushes, but if the berrys taste good, go for it. As i understand it, the human senses of taste and smell are tightly entwined, and we are quite adept at identifying things we should not eat.
 
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DocG

Full Member
Dec 20, 2013
732
51
Moray
So, 2 votes to go ahead. I tend to agree as I'm still okay.
If anyone has anymore information, please share it.
 

gra_farmer

Nomad
Mar 29, 2016
491
272
Kent
Is it a mold, or a dusting? And does it wipe off to show the current like the others.

If is dusty, and the leaves should have had a silvery dusting too, if so it will be powdery medew, wash well and would be okay. I will dig out my plant pathology books and get back to you when able.

But from experience, if it rubs off and/or does not taint the flavour, you should be okay.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,960
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S. Lanarkshire
Interesting :) I don't ever mind seeing those racks of dark seeds though.
Red currants to me are just that, red shiny berries.

He's gone the wrong way about seperating out the seeds though.
Simmer with very scant water until softened, mash with the tattie masher, and then into a flour sieve and work it through with a spoon.
Just do it a few spoonfuls at a time and there's no mess, it's relatively quick, and no seeds :) nor smashed up ones either.
It's a good way to do raspberries and blackcurrants for paste too.
If it's for jelly then just add more water and strain through a drip bag.

M
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,155
198
Devon
Interesting :) I don't ever mind seeing those racks of dark seeds though.
Red currants to me are just that, red shiny berries.

I think it is the fruit from red flowering currant, Ribes sanguineum, not what we would regard as red currants, Ribes rubrum.
 
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