1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hey Guest, We're having our annual Winter Moot and we'd love you to come. PLEASE LOOK HERE to secure your place and get more information.
    For forum threads CLICK HERE
    Dismiss Notice

Second overnighter. What did I forget this time!

Discussion in 'Out and About' started by tracker1972, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. tracker1972

    tracker1972 Forager

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Matlock
    It's only trip 2 of my promised monthly nights out and it was back in the same spot but, I got back out and that's the big thing for me.

    Last trip I carried so much stuff that I really didn't need (even I knew I didn't need it, I just left it in the pack) that it left me with a lightly unweildy pack (LK 70 pack on an LK 35 frame) so I wanted to get on top of that. Still needed the British Army bag. Took the DD overquilt as well as underquilt to top up the sleeping bag and I'm glad I did. Dropped sub-zero before I went to bed and probably a bit below afterwards but I was OK. Not too warm, but OK.

    Fire, or almost the lack of it was the bigger problem. It had been raining for days and everything I could find was soaked. The wood I foraged was generally just too moist to get going and my first attempt was frankly too rushed and relying on more luck than judgment. Wandering off into the trees, headtorch glowing I stumbled across some dead rhododendron hung up on some lower branches. Rocket fuel! Really made a difference and we got going. I had passed a small (maybe 8 meter) silver birch that had been knocked over when the trees had been felled a year ago on my way in so went back to salvage wood from that to try and get a snag fire got enough to dry wood as it went. Fortunately it worked and my usual steak, onions and mushrooms was augmented by some rather tasty sautéed sweet potato!
    The glorious morning with some blue sky, the ground boiling with mist, a couple of coffees and more nettle tea than you can shake a stick at was pure, relaxing bliss.

    The trip back included a small diversion to try and find a new spot that was more open and that might have even paid off. Cracking trip for me but I did prattle on at the camera a bit. Here is the video, but be warned, it's about 20 minutes. Still, is more for me than you ;)

    Here is to next month!

    https://youtu.be/iyz8l_Jfkjw

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
     
  2. jakunen

    jakunen Native

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,587
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nr. Reading, England
    Sounds like a good trip.

    Just one thing - I know honey from rhoddies is poisonous, so how safe is the wood to burn?
     
  3. tracker1972

    tracker1972 Forager

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Matlock
    I thought the same thing so just used it as kindling and stayed upwind until I was into the second wave of new wood on the fire. It burned that quickly I'm sure it would have burned off sooner but thought better safe than sorry!

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
     
  4. Adze

    Adze Native

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,874
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cumbria
    You're fine burning it, the toxin in the wood is probably the lowest level in the whole plant and it's destroyed by heating it up to over 150C.
     
  5. tracker1972

    tracker1972 Forager

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Matlock
    Reassuring, thank you :)

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
     
  6. Arya

    Arya Settler

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    796
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Norway
    Being a Rhododendron fan I just have to ask, do they grow wild there, or is it an old garden?
     
  7. Adze

    Adze Native

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,874
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Rhodies are an invasive non-native species for the large part in the UK. There are plenty which have self seeded and which spread far and wide. There's more information including links to the Forestry Commission management plan here: http://www.nonnativespecies.org/index.cfm?pageid=225

    Rhodies in a managed setting are a fine thing and the flowers are lovely in their season. The Valley Gardens in Windsor Great Park are amazing if you catch the flowering of the rhodies and azaleas.

    Rhodies un-managed are a pretty destructive, toxic species which smother native plants and destroy habitat for birds, mammals and invertebrates.
     
  8. Arya

    Arya Settler

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    796
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Norway
    I'm learning something new every day 😊
    Thank you Adze!
    I have to see the parks you are mentioning one day!
     
  9. Adze

    Adze Native

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,874
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cumbria
  10. Arya

    Arya Settler

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    796
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Norway
    Spectacular!
     
  11. tracker1972

    tracker1972 Forager

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Matlock
    As Adze says, they are lovely plants but have run wild over lots of spaces they just weren't planned to be. The ones I was referring to are spread across a managed coniferous plantation. The wood has however made a lovely lightweight walking staff for my 4 year old though and they have a couple of awesome dens inside rhodedendrons due to their tenancy to be open in the middle.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
     
  12. tracker1972

    tracker1972 Forager

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Matlock
    Unexpected development, out for a stroll past the spot today, they've been planting new trees! Probably today by the look of the sandwich crust that was left behind...
    [​IMG]

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
     
  13. Nomad64

    Nomad64 Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,017
    Likes Received:
    515
    Location:
    Just out of range
    As two of my objectives this year are (a) to work out a management plan for the profusion of rhododendrons I have, (I'd already checked out the FC guidance) and (b) have a go at keeping bees (I've inherited a hive and kit), I was a bit concerned at this so I did a bit of digging on t'interweb.

    The consensus seems to be that hullicinagenic/toxic rhododendron based honey seems to be unlikely to be an issue in the UK although there are some interesting myths associated with it.

    http://http://www.paghat.com/toxichoney.html

    Interesting subject though. :)
     
    #13 Nomad64, Feb 17, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2017
  14. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    12,208
    Likes Received:
    2,200
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Hallucinogenic honey....

    Will you accept credit cards?
    :)
     

Share This Page