1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Beautiful knives.

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by crosslandkelly, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Messages:
    22,827
    Likes Received:
    705
    Location:
    North West London
  2. Wayland

    Wayland Hárbarðr

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    10,475
    Likes Received:
    842
    Location:
    A traveler of both time and space
    Some outstanding work there.
     
    crosslandkelly likes this.
  3. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Messages:
    22,827
    Likes Received:
    705
    Location:
    North West London
    Practical or not, the craftmanship is superb.
     
  4. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,700
    Likes Received:
    2,086
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Gave me some inspiration there. Antler and the flint blade..... NICE!

    I think if you learn the material 'short comings' these blades should work very well. Humans did very well for tens of thousands of years with these materials..
    :)
     
    crosslandkelly likes this.
  5. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,793
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    Sharper than steel.
    I've been using "first strike" flint blades to cut up bison meat in my kitchen.
    Fast, clean, not slippery. Real delight.
     
    crosslandkelly likes this.
  6. woodsorrel

    woodsorrel Settler

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2014
    Messages:
    660
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Northern California, USA
    But do they have squared-off spines to work with a firesteel? (Joking!) :)

    I've seen obsidian knives made by descendants of the Ohlone People at cultural gatherings near where I live. I'm impressed by the ingenuity and craftsmanship. But I also appreciate what an incredible advance steel blades must have been.

    - Woodsorrel
     
    santaman2000 and crosslandkelly like this.
  7. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,793
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    I'm not so certain that the serrations are going to make the best meat-cutting edge.
    All the same, I would really like to enjoy the experience making the meat part of a meal.
    My blades are 3-6 cm slightly curved edges. And, no serrations. Not steak knives.
    At the first time, I had no idea what to expect for sharpness. Modern ceramic blades would be the best comparison.
    BUT
    They are hopeless at cutting vegetables and fruit. Hopeless.
     
  8. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,700
    Likes Received:
    2,086
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    I use a serrated (Mora) knife to do the first cut through the skin in fish when we fillet them.
    Some fish type Cusk have very slippery and leather tough skin, other have scales. A smooth edge is not so efficient then.
    But then I switch to a smooth edge.

    That is what I am used to, no doubt if I was born with a flint blade in my hand I could do everything with it!
     
  9. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,793
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    Imagine a finger-length sliver of flint. One edge is sharp, no handles at all. Hold the spine edge, thumb and fore finger.
    Not at all slippery when wet. Just long stroking cuts for the meat, like with any other knife.
    From the ease of the very first cut, I realized that I needed to take extra care
    to keep my fingers out of the way.
     
  10. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,700
    Likes Received:
    2,086
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    The Dodd gave us 10 fingers, so plenty of spares!
    Joking!

    Serious now: I wonder how chip prone flint is. I would not like to ingest those.
     
  11. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,793
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    I've used my flint blades a lot to enjoy the experience. No obvious chips yet.
    I will say that in the same length of time(12?) months, the commercial kitchen ceramic knives are
    just about throw-away saw-toothed again. Not good value. The veg peelers go the fastest.
     
  12. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,700
    Likes Received:
    2,086
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    I bought a Kyocera knife about a decade ago. Super sharp for a month, then duller and duller until I ditched it in the canal a couple of months later. Edge chipped more and more.
    Faulty technology.
     

Share This Page