Wild Camping "Full Time" Possible?

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petrochemicals

Full Member
Jul 30, 2012
3,488
201
westmidlands
Not trying to be the voice of doom or anything here dude its just walking 8000 thousand miles un-supported is a massive undertaking
And how far if you do the sensible thing and cut-off the coves and the islands and you just circumvent the problems of the coast outline. ? Don't tell me you forgot about islands?
 

Fadcode

Full Member
Feb 13, 2016
2,170
496
Cornwall
LukeD, I hope you haven,t been put off by the comments and advice given in the previous posts, and I hope you realise that they are logical and good advice, a lot of planning is needed for an endeavour like this, and if you are to succeed then nothing should be overlooked, for instance some of the little things, like if you carried a mobile phone, how would you keep it charged up, a necessity in my opinion as should you need help then you need a means of contacting somebody.

There are many people who undertake a trek like this, by doing it in stages, and there is nothing wrong with that, may take a bit longer but it probably is a lot safer and a lot easier to achieve the goal.

So don't be disheartened, its a good Idea, plan it out, look for the downfalls you may encounter and plan to overcome them, read about other peoples adventures of a similar theme, pick up as much information as you can, don't rush into things, find out just how tough you are by doing week long stints, read up on foods you can forage at certain times of the year, and plan accordingly, learn about traps and baits to catch wildfowl etc,

( If you know all this please forgive my ignorance, but I was just trying to cover all the options, not knowing what experience you have etc, etc)
 
Sep 16, 2013
444
128
Rochester, Kent
Have you considered testing yourself on a smaller route?

One day, I'd love to take a short career break (3-4 months) and have a go at hiking the SW Coastal Path (approx 600 miles). But if I was to do that, I'd do so with tried and tested equipment and a fair few quid in my back pocket so that I can gorge on pasties/fish and chips and spend the occasional night in a B&B so that I can have a shower/maintain kit.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,520
601
Bedfordshire
Doesn't look like he has been on here to read anything since Post 10. Chances are that that is the last we will see of him, going on how similar members/threads have gone in the past.
 
May 21, 2017
3
0
West Yorks
Nope, I'm still here just not had much time to log in or reply :)

I've read all of the posts, and have paid attention to them and I think that I will cycle it instead of walking. That way I can still do the fishing, foraging etc, but at the same time I can still cover ground.

It will also be a lot quicker so I'd need a lot less money. I'm only 24 so making quick money doing agency work doesnt really happen lol.
 

Old Bones

Settler
Oct 14, 2009
736
60
East Anglia
I've read all of the posts, and have paid attention to them and I think that I will cycle it instead of walking. That way I can still do the fishing, foraging etc, but at the same time I can still cover ground.
But even cycling, you've still got the same problem - you want to travel (by bike, rather than walking), to forage (to save money), and possibly work your way around the UK, all at the same time. You can do one of those, and possibly two at once, but three will be impossible.

Yes, you can work your way through via temp agencies, but temping isn't steady, you wont always have the skills, etc (I know, I temped for a long time). And you can't give an address which is a tarp somewhere. Foraging takes time and skill, and even then, there might be a good chance you end up with next to nothing, especially during the winter. And where would you forage? Most land is privately owned, so you wont have permission to forage, or stay on it.

Getting a bike is a better idea, but I think the people who suggested doing part of a coastal path and see what is possible, what equipment is needed and just how practical it is are right. Anyone taking on such a trip need to a lot of planning and have the resources available behind them - expecting something to just turn up wont cut it. I'd assume for a start that the foraging part is marginal at best, so that means buying food locally, and that needs cash, which in turn means savings.
 

bowji john

Silver Trader
Mar 24, 2015
138
3
Cornwall
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But even cycling, you've still got the same problem - you want to travel (by bike, rather than walking), to forage (to save money), and possibly work your way around the UK, all at the same time. You can do one of those, and possibly two at once, but three will be impossible.

Yes, you can work your way through via temp agencies, but temping isn't steady, you wont always have the skills, etc (I know, I temped for a long time). And you can't give an address which is a tarp somewhere. Foraging takes time and skill, and even then, there might be a good chance you end up with next to nothing, especially during the winter. And where would you forage? Most land is privately owned, so you wont have permission to forage, or stay on it.

Getting a bike is a better idea, but I think the people who suggested doing part of a coastal path and see what is possible, what equipment is needed and just how practical it is are right. Anyone taking on such a trip need to a lot of planning and have the resources available behind them - expecting something to just turn up wont cut it. I'd assume for a start that the foraging part is marginal at best, so that means buying food locally, and that needs cash, which in turn means savings.
+1

The issue here really is the foraging bit.

Gaining sufficient calories from foraging even when static, in an area that you know, with an abundance of edibles is very time consuming

Do a weekend somewhere and try it

Foraging is an excellent way of getting to know your area, plants and animal behavior, and edibles are a great way to supplement a diet and enrich your time in the woods etc - however it is my experience that there is a lot of nonsense talked about it as a realistic method for acquiring all our nutritional needs.

Others on here might have had a different experience and disagree but I don't think daily travel and foraging make a feasible plan
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
35,287
1,492
S. Lanarkshire
+another 1 to the foraging bit.

The only folks I know of who have done it for a few months, successfully, had years of knowledge, had spent years learning where and how to fish and seashore forage, and they only did it for the few short months of late Spring and early Summer…..and they all admit it was damned hard going,

per ounce of shelled winkles, cockles and the like, will gain you exactly 14 calories….there's a reason seafood is the first item on many diet sites.
http://www.superskinnyme.com/calories-in-seafood.html

Cycling only speeds up travelling, but to do that you have to expend energy…..and you have to maintain your bike too….and you need to cook your food. Humanity is the cooking ape, we make otherwise inaccessible calories and nutrients available by cooking them, as well as killing off bacteria and the like. I don't know about the laws on fires in England and Wales, but suspect you might need to take a great deal of care.

Away do a short trip for a couple of weeks, and with no cheating, see if you manage to feed yourself as you go along the coast.
It's the best time of the year to try it, it's warm enough to sleep comfortably with very little, and even if the heavens open the entire time, so long as you find dry shelter you'll just be miserable. Exposure isn't to be taken lightly though, so make sure you can get into dry clothing and warm up.

Personally I think you're woefully underprepared, but we all have to learn. I hope your learning experience is a good one :)

M
 

Suwarrow

Member
Jul 7, 2016
40
0
London
Slightly off topic, but I'd be interested to know if anyone has thought of sailing sections of the coast whilst foraging and fishing?

It would have to be a small enough boat to get inshore and up estuaries. You wouldn't expend too much energy whilst traveling and you could continually fish.

Foraging would be best done at low water Springs, a point that doesn't necessary agree with boats.

It'd have to be summer and you'd have to be competent. Also boats and relevant equipment don't come cheap so as I think of it less and less relevant to the original question.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,251
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Walking while foraging around UK would take you a life time. Easy to find food during summer and autumn, not so easy in winter and spring. You will use up large amounts of energy, so need to eat lots.

Fishing mackerel from the shore? Year round? I do not think do. You eill get small fish though, enough together will mussels and such, to satisfy your protein need.

Interesting idea and project. Feasible? Yes, with dedication and sacrifice of comforts and 'normal life'.

Cycling? Sure. Easier, quicker. But then, how will you forage? Fish? As roads are a fair distance away from the coast. And forests.

I would think the easiest would be to do a combination of walking and hitch hiking.
 
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Nomad64

Full Member
Nov 21, 2015
1,073
573
Just out of range
Nope, I'm still here just not had much time to log in or reply :)

I've read all of the posts, and have paid attention to them and I think that I will cycle it instead of walking. That way I can still do the fishing, foraging etc, but at the same time I can still cover ground.

It will also be a lot quicker so I'd need a lot less money. I'm only 24 so making quick money doing agency work doesnt really happen lol.
Unless you give the good people of this forum a clue as to your capabilities, particularly with regard to your foraging skills, there is a limit to the help you can expect here.

I've cycled (by a less than direct route and early in the year) from John O Groats to Lands End, walked the classic Coast to Coast route in winter, and done various other long distance walking, cycling and mountain bike routes and spent several years living out of a Land Rover in the African bush.

I've probably have a better idea than most people (not necessarily most people on this forum), what the physical, mental and financial requirements are for long term expeditions and if I had the time, I'd love to explore the length of the British coastline either on foot or by bike (although as others have said, rideable roads/tracks may take you away from the coast in many places and the novelty of lifting a loaded bike over locked gates wears thin after a while) and although I'm twice your age, be confident that I could physically do the walk or ride - my 80 year old mother is still chipping away at sections of the Welsh and SW Coastal walks! That said, having to wild camp every night especially during the winter would not appeal and I would starve in a week trying to forage for food along the way.

Please stop teasing us and give people some idea of your experience and skills. Without more information, we have no idea whether you are the secret love child of Richard Mabey and Judy Urquhart with both their skills and were taken away at birth Spartan style to be mentored and honed by Ranulph Fiennes as a teak hard expeditioner capable of enduring extreme hardship in pursuit of your goal or an overweight kid whose experience of the outdoors is gained by playing on a PlayStation, watching Gear Brylls shows and opening the door to the Dominos delivery guy.

I suspect that the truth is somewhere between the two but you have not given us anything much to go on.

:)
 

Trojan

Silver Trader
Mar 20, 2009
617
25
The Countryside
As others have pointed out what is your experience? Do you go camping a lot? Bushcraft skills? How fit are you? Do you walk long distances as a hobby? etc. etc. Many of us would like to do what you want, a few could but most could not.

Tell us more about your background.

My skills are ok but I could not do this trip with my knowledge and/or fitness.