War!

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TLM

Settler
Nov 16, 2019
744
271
66
Vantaa, Finland
I am waging one against Japanese and Sachalin knotweeds. Actually second year, so far it looks like I might be winning but that remains to be seen,
 

bobnewboy

Settler
Jul 2, 2014
898
304
North West Somerset
As soon as I can get an air rifle, I will be starting a war too! The rabbits in our garden are just too much this year - we have deep holes all round the edges of our lawns, and a newly excavated burrow in our ‘wild garden’. Even my missus (who is the Chief Gardener) has now declared that “something must be done”......

I suppose you will be making a chemical attack on your knotweed? It’s so pervasive that I suppose you’ll need to use something strong over a long period?
 

TLM

Settler
Nov 16, 2019
744
271
66
Vantaa, Finland
My attack is purely mechanical so far, tearing up the root system and cutting off all shoots. The roots of Sachalin knotweed are quite amazing, upto 6 cm dia, wooden and some meters long.
 

bobnewboy

Settler
Jul 2, 2014
898
304
North West Somerset
It sounds like you have a real battle on your hands, and probably several years of work ahead. If the roots are that big and solid perhaps both a physical and chemical approach? I seem to remember that here in the uk even the bits that you dig up are handled like industrial waste, and can’t be put into household bins. Good luck!
 

baggins

Full Member
Apr 20, 2005
1,389
160
45
Coventry (and up trees)
We'v got ratties. I actually don't mind them but the neighbours seem a bit miffed so trying various ways to get rid. And the cats are totally useless.
With the knotweeds, make sure every last bit of the plant you pull up is sealed away, it it notorious for being able to sprout from the smallest piece. Even burning can still leave enough to take root.
 

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
23,867
866
59
~Hemel Hempstead~
It sounds like you have a real battle on your hands, and probably several years of work ahead. If the roots are that big and solid perhaps both a physical and chemical approach? I seem to remember that here in the uk even the bits that you dig up are handled like industrial waste, and can’t be put into household bins. Good luck!
That's right, if you fail to dispose of it properly you could be liable to fines of up to £5000 and or maximum of 2 years in prison.

It pays to follow the guidelines on disposal very carefully as a piece of root the size of the end of your little finger is able to propgate itself very readily.

Thank goodness we don't have the male plant here or we'd be having to deal with it self seeding and that wqould be an even worse nightmare
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,468
535
Berlin
We collect potato beetles in coffee mugs and kill them with mini flame throwers.

I am unsure if it's against the Hague Conventions to candy them.
But I guess that's a nice idea for a crunchy snack in between...
 
Apr 8, 2009
1,054
53
Ashdown Forest
As soon as I can get an air rifle, I will be starting a war too! The rabbits in our garden are just too much this year - we have deep holes all round the edges of our lawns, and a newly excavated burrow in our ‘wild garden’.
I have no idea of your budget (or indeed experience with air rifles), but PCP's are getting much cheaper these days. I'm an adequate shot with a springer, but a PCP off a bipod (from say, a bedroom window!) allows for almost clinical levels of accuracy - which ultimately results in humane kills. An excellent option for a 'budget' PCP is the Gamo Phox - for circa £500 you can get a kit that contains the rifle, scope, silencer, bag, and crucially, hand pump.
 
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Damascus

Native
Dec 3, 2005
1,466
58
62
Norwich
I’ll second the Gamo phox, I’d been a springer man for years with my trusty hw80, a accurate rifle in its own right. I bought the Phox to test the water in the PCP market and the accuracy is excellent. I did buy the package but ssopped the scope off the HW80 as it was a better scope but for accuracy, will beat the springer hands down and the 10 Shot magazine lifts the air rifle to another level for any follow up shots. I have 22 rim fire and that is only used for the longer shots now! I paid £450 for mine complete with pump.
 
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bobnewboy

Settler
Jul 2, 2014
898
304
North West Somerset
I have no idea of your budget (or indeed experience with air rifles), but PCP's are getting much cheaper these days. I'm an adequate shot with a springer, but a PCP off a bipod (from say, a bedroom window!) allows for almost clinical levels of accuracy - which ultimately results in humane kills. An excellent option for a 'budget' PCP is the Gamo Phox - for circa £500 you can get a kit that contains the rifle, scope, silencer, bag, and crucially, hand pump.
I dont want to swerve TLMs thread too far, but....this is war! :)

Thanks for the info. I have seen that package, and might consider it if it is available at a local shop - I shop local where at all possible. I have zero air gun experience, but I have been a fair archer and am middling with a catty. I also have time and space to get in plenty of practice. However, for pest control, neither of those are accurate enough with me behind them, nor safe enough, when compared to a sub 12ftlb rifle. I have joined another forum (the horror!), and although I hear good stuff about PCPs, I am more minded towards a springer. It just seems like a lot less fuss, and is more self contained, IYSWIM. I am leaning heavily towards either an HW80 or 98 at the moment, plus the other stuff of course (scope, mounts, pellets, cleaning, target box (or I’ll make one), paper targets et al). I will for sure make my own leather slip and whatever else I need along those lines.
 

Woody girl

Full Member
Mar 31, 2018
2,713
1,811
61
Exmoor
I believe the roots of knotweed can go down a about 6 feet or more. You may think you've got rid of it but it comes back the following year. Riddle all the earth you dig to get every last bit out.
Chemical is the only way for permenant obliteration and even that can take several years.
It is a notifiable weed and I think the council will have an obligation to help you sort it out. If not the council there must be someone that you can get hold of. I heard something on the radio yesterday about this but I wasn't listening properly as the exmoor park is who we have to notify so I didn't listen too closely... sorry, that info would have been helpful to you.
Worth getting in touch perhaps.
 

swotty

Space and time
Apr 25, 2009
1,647
64
Somerset
Don't dismiss the Crosman 2250...CO2 so no pump or dive bottle needed... aftermarket magazines available and highly customisable!

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 

TLM

Settler
Nov 16, 2019
744
271
66
Vantaa, Finland
I don't have rats, a few moles and some mice, not too bothersome really.

Up here it looks like most of the roots are not very fond of ground frost, Sachalin is spreading much faster than Japanese. Areas that I dug up last year are only producing very few shoots. I have an area of about 100 sqm covered with differing density. As said it looks good so far but I understand it does take some years to be certain.
 

Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,870
458
47
Wiltshire
Theres lots in Cornwall.

Some in Wiltshire too (Japanese knotweed i mean)

But more often, a completley bare patch where it has been poisoned.
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,079
148
Devon
Thank goodness we don't have the male plant here or we'd be having to deal with it self seeding and that wqould be an even worse nightmare
That might change in the not too distant future. I read something a few weeks back that said Russian vine can cross with Japanese Knotweed and form an invasive hybrid. That, in turn, could provide a male plant that would readily pollinate the knotweed.

I'd be curious to know if the Councils have any role in sorting it out as there's an awful lot on council land around here that they do nothing about and even seem to spread it.
 

Mesquite

Anyone for sailing?
Mar 5, 2008
23,867
866
59
~Hemel Hempstead~
That might change in the not too distant future. I read something a few weeks back that said Russian vine can cross with Japanese Knotweed and form an invasive hybrid. That, in turn, could provide a male plant that would readily pollinate the knotweed.

I'd be curious to know if the Councils have any role in sorting it out as there's an awful lot on council land around here that they do nothing about and even seem to spread it.
There's clear precedent that's been decided in courts against both individuals and large businesses about the liability of controling knotweed and bearing the cost for clearance if it invades your property.

This site has a lot of information regarding what to do if your neighbour has knotweed and you're concerned about it
 

Damascus

Native
Dec 3, 2005
1,466
58
62
Norwich
My personal war is on rats, with open fields side and rear to me, I get plenty in the garden. Feeding the birds is an issue, my idea of sport though is the stale bread ends tied to a brick so the they can’t run off with it and sniping from the upstairs bedroom window!
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
313
195
yorks
so from experience. If you are a tinkerer, hw99s in .22 is perfect. In .177 the hw77, tx200, prosport or walther LGV/LGU are brilliant springers. Air arms tend to be a better finish though IMO.