Splicing large rope?

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spandit

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 6, 2011
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Bought some c.30mm sisal rope at a local auction today (£18). Turns out it is in 2 bits, one of 15m, the other of 5m (there was also 27m of 20mm sisal rope). Anyway, the ends on the larger rope are unfinished and I'd like to put an eye splice in there so I can use them for practical purposes. Has anyone spliced rope this thick? What should I use for whipping the ends?
 

Robson Valley

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Nov 24, 2014
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Is this typical 3-strand in a spiral? I've recently worked with 1/2" and 5/8" nylon for eyes and back-spliced ends.
I used plain painter's masking tape to keep everything from unravelling then cut off the excess.
I liked the weave to be about the same as the length of the eye to look good to me, each strand going under maybe 4 times.

I'll guess that bigger rope will take more muscle power.
Good luck finding big enough fids for the strands.
 
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Nice65

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Apr 16, 2009
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Get onto a yacht chandlers site maybe. I’ve spliced similar in nylon/poly but it was years ago now. I used a nylon whipping twine, it was hard on the hands. At least 4 tucks, I tucked all 3 strands 4 times, then trimmed one off and continued with 2, then trimmed off another one. Gives the splice some taper, so as not to catch.

I’d imagine your whipping is for the finished splice rather than the ends? With the nylon/poly rope I just hot spooned to seal.
Maybe also PM Asemery on here, he does a lot of rope work?
 

Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
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I've spliced rope over 2" diameter. It's just harder to work, but the principle's the same. Nice65 described it tidily.
Whipping the larger ropes we used tarry twine. You can make your own from ordinary cotton string and stockholm tar, or you can use hemp twine or anything that grips a little.
I know folks use nylon and meltweld the end but for natural rope I'd find something natural too.
If an unstranded length turns out to be well spun and doesn't fall apart under a good pull, then you can over twist it and use that too.

Seagull or Asemery would probably be the most accurate folks on this though.

M
 

spandit

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 6, 2011
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It is the ends I wanted to whip. I might just tape them for now and leave long enough. I have linen thread for leatherworking or as Toddy said, I could use sisal. I'll give it a go and see how I get on. Good job the wife isn't in so I can bring it into the warm!
 

Seagull

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Jul 16, 2004
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It was common for Seamen to carry, along with their Knife and Spike, a little tallow in a cow horn, just for this purpose.
If the OP's hands are raw, a large Swedish Fid, or a foot long length of 5mm dim plastic pipe, withe one side fined down, will much reduce the grunt needed to draw up the tucks. In past times, "Splitshoorns" from real cows horns, were used in pretty much the same way as Swedish Fids.
regards
Ceeg
 
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spandit

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 6, 2011
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East Sussex, UK
Doesn't tallow start to smell after a while? Might try with some coconut oil as don't have any tallow. Done one end - looks pretty good, if I say so myself. The ends were all properly whipped, seems a shame to cut them.
 
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Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
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Not really, no. It dries and hardens as it ages. It doesn't go soft and rancid. One reason why it was used by Seamen.
It's a very long keeping fat. Cobblers used it too.

M
 

spandit

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 6, 2011
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East Sussex, UK
Well. I don't have any so I used some coconut oil, which smells amazing. Second splice went a lot quicker than the first. Just whipping the tails with some linen thread that I normally use for leatherwork. Looks neat. Could use jute strands, I suppose. Got another length to do so plenty of practice available!
 

Nice65

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I’ve remembered what I used, Marlow waxed cotton whipping twine. The thin type really bites the rope and makes the whipping secure enough to take a battering. The free end of an old three strand climbing or felling rope gets bashed about and pulled through branches, but it rarely came loose.
 
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spandit

Bushcrafter through and through
Jul 6, 2011
5,435
125
East Sussex, UK
Will do. I had a tug of war with a mate's pickup truck and mine - rope held up well and really set the splice nicely. I'm going to redo the ends - the smaller diameter of rope that I bought has the ends split in two and divided around the last strand then combined and whipped the other side, if that makes sense
 
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Seagull

Settler
Jul 16, 2004
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Splitting the Working ends in two, then partner-seizing to the next working part...used to be a fairly standard in polyprop ropes, particularly in the finish of Octoplait splices.
When time is not a consideration is still a belt and braces practise, working with laid-up manmades.
Regards all
Ceeg
 
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