Potential issues with getting out in Caledonian forest

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Ed the Ted

Forager
Dec 13, 2013
144
41
Scotland
Hi all,

I have a couple of questions about getting out overnight in a large section of the Caledonian forest in Speyside (which is largely an RSPB reserve).

I presume that building basic shelters and such is fine with fallen wood so long as significant structures aren't left about the place, but will likely get myself a cheap tarp or just go out on clear nights.

What's standard practice wth regard to fires? Would something closely monitored in a firebox on a rock/fallen tree or something be acceptable or is the risk in a predominately pine forest like this too great?

Given that it's an area with so much wildlife I'll be very cautious to minimise my effect, especially with regard to burning dead wood which is so good for the insects that are such a good food source for the birds, but is there any other advice/anything else that I should know about or consider?

Thanks,

E
 

Ed the Ted

Forager
Dec 13, 2013
144
41
Scotland
I don't think fires are a great idea in such an important forest, a lot of the soil is peat.

The RSPB lot have used controlled fires to try to regenerate certain areas, which suggests that it's not entirely a powder keg waiting to set alight. I feel that at this time of year with the ground frozen hard, snow cover and mounting the firebox off the ground, it'd be fine. Thoughts?
 

greensurfingbear

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
The RSPB lot have used controlled fires to try to regenerate certain areas, which suggests that it's not entirely a powder keg waiting to set alight. I feel that at this time of year with the ground frozen hard, snow cover and mounting the firebox off the ground, it'd be fine. Thoughts?

the access stuff is all there. follow the rules are you wont cause any problems. Firebox raised off the ground should be fine
 

Wayland

Hárbarðr
Whilst definitely not encouraging camping in a reserve, if I am camping in environmentally sensitive areas I generally take a few "Crackle Logs" along with me.

They burn cheerfully for hours without using up local resources if they are scarce. If there is plenty of wood they reduce the amount you do need to use and if the available wood is damp, they are fantastic fire lighters.
 
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Ed the Ted

Forager
Dec 13, 2013
144
41
Scotland
(which is largely an RSPB reserve). Errr awkward

Why's that?

The ground may be soaked with all this rain......

It's currently frozen hard according to a friend, and after last night probably has a nice covering of the cold white stuff. This seems like a pretty safe bet for a little fire to me.


Whilst definitely not encouraging camping in a reserve, if I am camping in environmentally sensitive areas I generally take a few "Crackle Logs" along with me.

They burn cheerfully for hours without using up local resources if they are scarce. If there is plenty of wood they reduce the amount you do need to use and if the available wood is damp, they are fantastic fire lighters.

Definitely a good idea!
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,735
1,692
McBride, BC
As a local resident, I despise hunting camps that leave what they can't
be bothered to carry out. Leave your footprints.
There are two groups, maybe 30 people in all, who occupy the same
two wilderness camp sites each autumn (Moose/deer/bear.) They are usually successful,
several animals on the meat pole.

I love those people = I've been in there a couple of days after they pack up.
No evidence except some flattened grass. That's it. The meat pole is actually
semi permanent and hidden from the logging road.
 

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