Low Budget Equipment 2019

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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
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Berlin
I agree! Beginners mainly should use what they have.

But often the stuff people find in their home or in charity shops doesn't really serve outdoors.

The hunting clothing I recommended here is French summer hunting clothing. It has nothing to do with usual northern European hunting equipment. I use it a lot and its fine. The Austrian army surplus stuff is usually very good for hiking an bushcraft.

I have no Idea about Scandinavian circumstances.
All together I spend perhaps 10 month over there, mainly in summer and autumn.
I guess it's not totally different to north eastern Germany but of course it's different!
 
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Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
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The thing is Erbswurst most of us who post here are not beginners. Those who are are usualy intelligent enough to work out what they need and how to get it. Or even ask for help in choosing a particular bit of kit. As even the most experienced do on occasion.
Personally (and nothing against you) I would have got very bored reading all those recommendations and chasing all those links and given up after very few .
I'd have given up! :)
Most of what you need is common sense and experimentation untill you find what suits your particular needs. What was suitable for me when I was much younger would not suit me nowadays. There is no definitive list.
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Common sense is based on stuff you learned without even knowing you learned anything.
Judging from many, many internet sites, specially YouTube channels, it is not God given.
Experimentation is fine, if you have a strong sense of self preservation, and do it in your garden...


I am personally not in the 'buying new equipment' mode as what I have will last me until the Home for Geriatrics, but did enjoy looking in those websites.

The young people today have so much nice stuff to choose from. Not sure how it will last though.

On items that are crucial for your wellbeing or even survival, I have been taught to buy the best, disregarding the cost.
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,708
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Berlin
Different to the times when we had been young, nowadays there is so much stuff offered, that a beginner has no chance to understand what he really needs and most you tube videos don't really help him.

As you see, I simply listed what old boy scout books told the reader to put in his rucksack and looked for similar clothing, how they had been used 100 years ago, but for a reasonable price, and I tested most of it, if it really survives a few years of normal use. Thats all.

:)

Nowadays the problem of the most people isn't, that they can't buy stuff. The modern difficulty is to avoid over priced stuff which nobody needs and no experienced person would buy for hiking.

I am a lot in hostels and on camping grounds, because I travel a lot for my business, and I can tell you: It's incredible how much money young people throw out of the window for stuff they don't need.

Just look in the second hand offers in this forum here. Most stuff I wouldn't take as a gift! And most offers are still over priced...
 
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Woody girl

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Mar 31, 2018
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Yes I buy the best I can afford... mostly second hand if possible. The only brand new items I have bought this year are a sleeping mat as mine was no longer working for me both in comfort and weight. Would have loved a exped down mat but cost made it not an option... and a new 4x4 tarp as I felt the 3x3 though fine to sleep under for a night or two didn't work when I spent more than that or it was wet. But these were up grades for my personal comfort as I need a lot more nowadays ! Also money tho still tight is not as tight as it once was while bringing up kids. I can afford the occasional splash once or twice a year... but I still have to save up to do it.
I think that doing stuff in your garden to keep safe is a bit of a cop out! Those miserable wet and cold nights are the best way to learn! No running indoors to make a cup of tea and fall into a warm bed instead...... but then I'm fairly old school... or masochistic :) :)
 

Woody girl

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Just look in the second hand offers in this forum here. Most stuff I wouldn't take as a gift! And most offers are still over priced...
Realy??????
I've had some good bargains and I'm grateful for them.
 

Woody girl

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Mar 31, 2018
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I'll stick to buying British gear thanks. It's too late to try to mitigate that comment . By by!
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
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637
Berlin
I would be glad to find in this thread here recommendations from other experienced bushcrafters and hikers about approved long lasting equipment that is sold for very low costs.
If possible with a link to a trader who offers the stuff currently.

:)
 

GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
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Not sure what you mean about "approved long lasting" . Most of my really good stuff comes from second-hand shops. A thorough inspection will soon tell if it's had much wear. Just go around with an open mind and a keen eye, and remember, the woods aren't a fashion show, function foremost. The Gortex jacket I wear currently retails at over £400, it cost me £3 at a village jumble sale that I just happened to be passing. I got a new old stock Swedish military wool jacket somewhere else for very little, and it is great for out and about in the winter, better than my Kromer in fact.
 
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Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I think it is difficult to find new high quality items for low (cheap) cost.

Morakniv is one manufacturer that fulfills this criteria, a couple other Scandi brands too, if you do not mind Far East manufacture.

I do not think Erbswurst was thinking of used items.
 
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Erbswurst

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Mar 5, 2018
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Berlin
I also got incredible cheap outdoor clothing in second hand shops, and I always look inside if I pass one. Hunting clothing, special outdoor clothing, useful civil woolen clothing, military field uniforms and other old military equipment or folding knifes and camping stuff at flee markets for example.

But I think, I could make the bargains, because I am very informed about qualities and other people usually aren't.

So the second hand shop isn't really a good recommendation to beginners, because mainly the old foxes can understand what is a bargain and what is rubbish.

My question goes more in the direction work clothing perhaps, available military surplus and new products for low prices like some Mora and Hultafors and Opinel knifes for example or the Decathlon stuff I recommended.
As I wrote, I would like to see here links to traders of currently available cheap but approved long lasting stuff, that is useful for a well assorted and extremely streamlined beginners first outfit and equipment.
In Germany we have a shop called "Bauhaus" for example, that throws Mora knifes behind you in a red sheath. Or we get Nordpol socks in the workwear shops for a few Euros, which had been issued to Bundeswehr soldiers over decades.

I got here the question if I would earn money by recommending Solognac equipment. But nobody comes here with equal high quality and inexpensive stuff...

Does everybody here in the forum uses exclusively high end expedition equipment and stuff from the charity shop?
Did nobody else try out low budget equipment and still available cheap military surplus???
 

Janne

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Feb 10, 2016
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Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I would never buy used shoes or boots.
Not because of hygiene issues, but because I like the shoe or boot to be broken in, or moulded, to my feet.

If you are trekking longer distances, perfectly broken in footwear is a must.
 
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Erbswurst

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Mar 5, 2018
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Yes, that's the reason why I gave here four examples I would try out, if I was on a budget. That shoes are new.

Most modern boots are broken after 7 years standing in the wardrobe. That's the reason why in the end I gave two examples of boots made in traditional way who usually can live far longer and that give every European shoemaker master the option to replace the soles after a few years. Such boots I pointed out here for 150 € usually cost round about 300 €.

I would probably buy such stuff second hand from privat persons who didn't really use them, but never ever as army surplus.
 

Feurio

Member
Jul 15, 2019
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Bavarian Alps
One might also consider walking barefoot. :)
Sounds like a joke maybe, but honestly: isn't walking barefoot the ultimate bushcraft footwear? You experience the natural world way more intensely (obviously via your feet, but also because you have to watch out for thorns etc.), stalking becomes easier and after all it really is ultralight. If one kilogram on your feet equals five on your back in terms of ergonomic weight, think how much lighter your walk will feel!
Of course one might also go for "primitive" footwear like mocassins or their modern equivalent "barefoot running shoes" (esp. in colder climates). I take the Merrell Vapor Glove for spring-autumn hikes with almost any duration and region (exept very rocky high alpine routes). They cost about 100 €, I got mine on sale for 35 €. No need to break them in. You should be used to walk on uneven ground though. Complete beginners who only walked flat surfaces before might want some added ankle stability.
The only downside, they go to waste rather quickly (1-2 years of regular use). Unfortunately I am not aware of a more sustainable solution.
 
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GuestD

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Feb 10, 2019
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New One might also consider walking barefoot.
The old Scottish cattle drovers did, and when my parents lived on the west coast of Scotland over 60 years ago, in the summer, children would walk to school barefoot. Unfortunate thing about today's "natural"world is it seems to involve broken glass in the most remote places.
 

Laurentius

Native
Aug 13, 2009
1,883
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Knowhere
I would never buy used shoes or boots.
Not because of hygiene issues, but because I like the shoe or boot to be broken in, or moulded, to my feet.

If you are trekking longer distances, perfectly broken in footwear is a must.
Seems to work for me though, maybe I am just lucky, most comfortable pair of boots I own is second hand.
 
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MikeeMiracle

Full Member
Aug 2, 2019
110
32
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Northampton
Andes Ramada Rucksack 120L. I have been using this for over a year now and only just replaced it because I wanted something a bit smaller with more organisation, Molle webbing and a dedicated hydration pack space / slots. It's solid and I have no doubt it would last many years. I will probably go back to using it in the Winter months due to the extra storage capacity.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Andes-Camo...95A032B2Y8J&psc=1&refRID=3QCMK0NJX95A032B2Y8J
 
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GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
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Seems to work for me though, maybe I am just lucky, most comfortable pair of boots I own is second hand.
I've never had second hand boots, but a good friend swears by ex German army surplus boots. He always walks through a river on a hot day until they are completely soaked and then wears them until dry. The theory being they will take the shape of his feet, then fit a new quality insole. Seems to work.