Dyneema for Hammocks

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Peter_t

Native
Oct 13, 2007
1,353
1
East Sussex
Nylon is a bit stretchy, compared to dyneema/spectra.

Nick
yes but only a small amount, for example a 15mm hollow webbing sling has a breaking strengh of 2500kg and will only stretch a noticeable amount when you put a large load on it such as 300kg which makes the weight of a man a little insignificant.

why not use polyester then? not very strechy at all, or pre-strech polyester which isn't far behind dyneema in terms of stretch

pete
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,885
1,385
63
Pembrokeshire
:lmao: how many pies have you guys been eating!?

im sorry but all this talk of dyneema and spectra for hammocks is an extreme case off over the top! :eek:
dyneema and such materials are designed for the most demanding tasks such as replacing wire tow ropes or taking huge shock loads!

imo for a hammock you would only need a rope with a 2:1 safety factor, only twice your weight. this will take into account any loss of strength due to knots, general wear etc. but any more is unnecessary. so really all you need is a cheep rope or webbing with a suitable thickness to grip the tree without causing damage to thin barked trees.

or am i missing something? what is wrong with nylon or polyester? :confused:
feel free to get expensive technical ropes but trust me your wasting your time and money

pete
This kinda sums up my thoughts on the matter...I just do not see the point.....:eek:
 

wentworth

Settler
Aug 16, 2004
573
2
36
Australia
:lmao: how many pies have you guys been eating!?

im sorry but all this talk of dyneema and spectra for hammocks is an extreme case off over the top! :eek:
dyneema and such materials are designed for the most demanding tasks such as replacing wire tow ropes or taking huge shock loads!

imo for a hammock you would only need a rope with a 2:1 safety factor, only twice your weight. this will take into account any loss of strength due to knots, general wear etc. but any more is unnecessary. so really all you need is a cheep rope or webbing with a suitable thickness to grip the tree without causing damage to thin barked trees.

or am i missing something? what is wrong with nylon or polyester? :confused:
feel free to get expensive technical ropes but trust me your wasting your time and money


pete
Because the load on the hammock straps can be greater than just the weight of the body in it. Depending on how tight the straps are pulled to begin with, dynamic movement within the hammock and when loading unloading the hammock.
Straps should not be of less than 700lb strength, according to people from hammock forums. Weaker straps may hold for a while, but why take the risk?
 

Mr Adoby

Forager
Sep 6, 2008
152
0
The woods, Småland, Sweden
Just wrap the spectra around the tree two or three times, that will spread the load.

Less damage than the monthly storms.

It is seriously strong and packs down a lot smaller than tape.

Nick
No, that is wrong. The full load will be still on the rope(s) actually carrying the load of the hammock. Not on the extra wraps around the tree. With some creative advanced rope-work you might spread the load, but PLEASE use tapes/treehuggers.

A stretched horisontal hammock excert serious forces on the tree... Easily more than three times you weight if you were hanging vertical in the rope. This can be used to topple trees...
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,831
910
Bedfordshire
Hi,
Use 1 inch (25mm) webbing. 6mm anything is not a tree hugger. Tree huggers are made of webbing. It isn't a question of what is wise, it is a matter of avoiding damaging the tree, and not giving everyone else who wants to use a hammock a bad name.

If you want to get picky, it is probable that webbing isn't needed to avoid compression damage to large mature trees with thick rugged bark, but it isn't for certain, and it makes no sense to have a suspension system that you can only used on huge oak trees and cannot use on 8" ash without hurting them.

If the bulk or weight of the webbing is a concern, you just need to look for better webbing. For instance, I have used nylon, loose polyester, dense tightly woven polyester and finally settled on a loose weave of Dynema and Polypropylene from Dutchware Gear in the US. Still bulky, but low stretch and low weight. There are Dynema webbing tapes out there (Ripstop By The Roll carry them)
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,831
910
Bedfordshire

This is one of the best places to get hammock gear...or to use as inspiration for shopping for alternatives on this side of the Atlantic.
 

TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,060
419
Vantaa, Finland
Basically any of the high molecular weight linear polyethylenes are stiff and strong and take sunlight well but melt easily, somewhat difficult to tie knots and usually not necessary but can be used. Polyester takes sunlight well and is strong and stiff enough for most practical camping applications. Polyamides (Nylon) have very many different grades but generally expect it not to last in sunlight but it is strong and takes impact loads well. Polypropylene is not in my list of camping materials except short lived secondary applications.
 

AudiolabQ

New Member
Nov 16, 2019
3
0
50
Wales, UK
Hi,
Use 1 inch (25mm) webbing. 6mm anything is not a tree hugger. Tree huggers are made of webbing. It isn't a question of what is wise, it is a matter of avoiding damaging the tree, and not giving everyone else who wants to use a hammock a bad name.

If you want to get picky, it is probable that webbing isn't needed to avoid compression damage to large mature trees with thick rugged bark, but it isn't for certain, and it makes no sense to have a suspension system that you can only used on huge oak trees and cannot use on 8" ash without hurting them.

If the bulk or weight of the webbing is a concern, you just need to look for better webbing. For instance, I have used nylon, loose polyester, dense tightly woven polyester and finally settled on a loose weave of Dynema and Polypropylene from Dutchware Gear in the US. Still bulky, but low stretch and low weight. There are Dynema webbing tapes out there (Dutch carries such)
Thank you Claycomb, a simply great answer.;)
Hi,
Use 1 inch (25mm) webbing. 6mm anything is not a tree hugger. Tree huggers are made of webbing. It isn't a question of what is wise, it is a matter of avoiding damaging the tree, and not giving everyone else who wants to use a hammock a bad name.

If you want to get picky, it is probable that webbing isn't needed to avoid compression damage to large mature trees with thick rugged bark, but it isn't for certain, and it makes no sense to have a suspension system that you can only used on huge oak trees and cannot use on 8" ash without hurting them.

If the bulk or weight of the webbing is a concern, you just need to look for better webbing. For instance, I have used nylon, loose polyester, dense tightly woven polyester and finally settled on a loose weave of Dynema and Polypropylene from Dutchware Gear in the US. Still bulky, but low stretch and low weight. There are Dynema webbing tapes out there (Dutch carries such)
Hi C_Claycomb,
Thank you for your simply great and informative response