Czech Army sleeping bag/bedroll, myths and legends

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Apr 7, 2016
391
51
suffolk
There are more comments and videos on this on the web than midges on a loch..........so I'm not going to reiterate it all here, just clarify some myths and legends...........

1/ It is dirt cheap, and blinding value, irrespective of any expectation (£10-£13)
2/ It works....more below....

3/ It's not compact, nor light, as it's basically nothing more than a blanket, sheet and nylon bag. (And cheaper than most wool blankets alone....)

I don't like to be cold, but have slept (well insulated from ground) at below freezing temperatures (-3 to-7 deg. C), and slept well with it, without any other additions/clothing etc.
An additional blanket, pre shaped and with button holes can be added for £5. The blankets are warm and work. They are synthetic (I have yet to see a natural fibre one, as alleged on some sites... although it is possible on very early bags?) and can therefore be washed, as can the excellent linen liner. All just buttons in/out.
It will still roll up into hood with 2nd blanket attached.

Right, the hood, the bit no one mentions in the "how to" /review videos:
Obviously bag rolls there in, prior to buttoning/strapping up. However, when laid out, invert the hood bag so the liner is exposed and locate your "pillow" thereunder and secure in the hood pocket now underneath. Your head will now be on linen, and not anything else.
Still cold, and want a mummy style hood? Fold over right hand top corner and zip together, and when in bag do same to left side with long zip. Hey presto, one linen and blanket lined hood with a further cord if you want it all tighter. Makes a helluva difference, if a little confining...............
I'm 6' 4", and 100 kg, and it all fits me fine.

To summarise, in no particular order........

Easy to clean/wash, as it all unbuttons
Dirt cheap
Stonking value whilst available (Military Mart?) for any use you may choose.
Effective
Adaptable
Bulky............
 
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Philster

Settler
Jun 8, 2014
661
25
Poole, Dorset
I had one as it seems to be a bushcraft rite of passage ;) It's heavy and bulky, the zip is cold and lets a breeze though and it's not particularly warm. Once you add a second blanket (which is pretty much necessary for winter)the weight then becomes silly - it's an interesting historical piece but no comparison to even a cheap sleeping bag. If you want to go the wool blanket route then spend your money on a couple of good wool blankets instead.
Just my thoughts,
Phil
 
Apr 7, 2016
391
51
suffolk
I would just buy a 58 sleeping bag and be done with it.
All of which misses the point? It was under a "review" thread, and was in no way, a preferential essay or anything on the bag, although I do have one ( and 2 other bags),
just as far as possible, a quantitive piece on what it is, for anyone looking into it......?
 
Apr 7, 2016
391
51
suffolk
More on the bedroll theme, rather than bag; I have come across these two:

1/ Polish Army Mk 2 bedroll. £15 from Military Mart and

2/ Czech "Army Officer bedroll and bag". £35 OneArmy ebay. This is not the excellent value Czech Army blanket sleeping bag, but a quilted thing..........


The Polish thing is a pure bedroll, heavy duty cotton with a slot to insert a sim or sleeping bag and rolls and ties into itself. Quality of stitching and straps is poor, padding whether cotton wad or down (you can choose) is thin, except the attached pillow. Condition as supplied was good. Not really a lot of use, but would, as MM say on site make an excellent underquilt for hammocks I guess?

The Czech " superquilt" /bag is just that: it is a quilt that folds up and buttons (duffel coat type?) to form a thick, hooded sleeping bag if wished. Thicker and better finished than the Polish bedroll. The price is, I feel, a little steep at £35, but supplied unused and very good condition. I imagine it would be VERY warm when used in conjunction with the Czech army sleeping bag....

Obviously neither is back packing gear......

More when they have been used..............

.....but if anyone wants a cheap bedroll, I am happy to give the bedroll (polish one?) to anyone who wants it and can collect.....Suffolk area.
 
Apr 7, 2016
391
51
suffolk
Remember the soldiers do not carry this kind of equipment in most armies, as they are transported by lorry.

Hence the weight.
..and hence my comment about backpacking suitability...........?

However the Polish one is not heavy, just bulky and of questionable use?
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Exactly. I fail to understand why so many guys here love the surplus equipment they buy.
An Infantery soldier did not carry much. Apart from his weaponry he carried a snack, Gas mask and Poncho. The poncho was to be used in addition to the gas mask in an gas attack. On longer duration patrols, more than a couple of hours, maybe overnight, he had his backpack with a little bit more food, sleeping bag ( in winter) and in some forces a cooker type Nesbit.
Only units type Ranger units had to lug everything for a week or two, but even they had a supply vehicle.

..and hence my comment about backpacking suitability...........?

However the Polish one is not heavy, just bulky and of questionable use?
 
Apr 7, 2016
391
51
suffolk
Fraid I'm lost....I was just writing a quick summary on a couple of recently available bedrolls, which are something some people like to use, and might find some info handy........I know nothing about gas masks and attacks........hey ho.
 

philipb

Forager
Feb 20, 2016
197
0
wales
Exactly. I fail to understand why so many guys here love the surplus equipment they buy.
An Infantery soldier did not carry much. Apart from his weaponry he carried a snack, Gas mask and Poncho. The poncho was to be used in addition to the gas mask in an gas attack. On longer duration patrols, more than a couple of hours, maybe overnight, he had his backpack with a little bit more food, sleeping bag ( in winter) and in some forces a cooker type Nesbit.
Only units type Ranger units had to lug everything for a week or two, but even they had a supply vehicle.
after 20 years in the British army and knowing some about chemical warfare the above comment does not match up to anything I have experienced
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
You were not taught the drill: gasmask on, hide under poncho and button up all clothes?
Next step is to prepare your autoinjectot for use, ready your water bottle.

We were taught that in the Swedish army. But then we were prepared for an attack by the Soviets.
ABC preparedness was huge.

What were you taught?

Laurence, my point was that the bedrolls were not made to be carried for long. Too heavy. Many Bushcrafters here buy surplus stuff that was never meant to be used in the fashion they want to use it.
 
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philipb

Forager
Feb 20, 2016
197
0
wales
You were not taught the drill: gasmask on, hide under poncho and button up all clothes?
Next step is to prepare your autoinjectot for use, ready your water bottle.

We were taught that in the Swedish army. But then we were prepared for an attack by the Soviets.
ABC preparedness was huge.

What were you taught?

Laurence, my point was that the bedrolls were not made to be carried for long. Too heavy. Many Bushcrafters here buy surplus stuff that was never meant to be used in the fashion they want to use it.
I don't want to hijack the thread but to answer your question

I was surprised that you say an infantry soldier does not carry much. My experience was of quite heavy loads with body armour, radios, radio batteries, ammo, metal detection equipment, other electronic equipment, water and it all adds up. But I guess different units have their own way of doing things and different equipment for different theatres of operation. For example the British army does not use a poncho for protection from chemicals but a full suit
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,257
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
I don't want to hijack the thread but to answer your question

I was surprised that you say an infantry soldier does not carry much. My experience was of quite heavy loads with body armour, radios, radio batteries, ammo, metal detection equipment, other electronic equipment, water and it all adds up. But I guess different units have their own way of doing things and different equipment for different theatres of operation. For example the British army does not use a poncho for protection from chemicals but a full suit
Yes, sorry about the highjacking, but it does have ( a bit) relevance to it.
The kit you mention is what I include in the weaponry I mentioned. Does not leave much weight for bedrolls, food, stuff which is transported by ither means.

Full ABC protection suit (Hazmat suits) are not carried by the individual. During the NATO/ WP era, the Swedish Army Infantery those were carried by the Regiment supply trucks. My unit had a few in the Squadron Bv, good for one platoon.

I can not answer what is todays isdued equipment, my knowledge is of the same age as those bedrolls and sleeping bags!

I think you did a good review and observation, I just wanted to explain about the backround. Sorry if I upset you!
 
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Apr 7, 2016
391
51
suffolk
Laurence, my point was that the bedrolls were not made to be carried for long. Too heavy..
Hi Janne, yes you're right; that being why I said as much in the "review"?

However, if someone wants something SERIOUSLY bulky and heavy, there is the curious "Czech Army Officer Sleeping Bag /Bedroll": not to be confused with the Bivvy/blanket/sheet bag, which I love. This is a massive, heavy cotton and thickly stuffed (unlike the Polish one above) double sized quilt that folds around you and fastens with toggles (aka duffel coat ) to form an origami bag.
Incredibly warm, especially with a bag in it, brilliant for hammockers not carrying stuff because it is VERY bulky and heavy. Canoeists and car campers will love it....if you have room!

£35 inc delivery OneArmy on ebay.
 
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Tonyuk

Settler
Nov 30, 2011
882
50
Scotland
I had a czech bedroll for about a year. Used it a few times but i was never impressed by it, too cold and bulky. I'd avoid them personally.

Tonyuk