BOMB PROOF EQUIPMENT

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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,729
646
Berlin
That is the right question.

Outdoors the ground is usually soft.

But I personally use it indoors too and at touristic camping grounds as well.

And there the concrete is everywhere around the taps.
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
544
364
yorks
I'd like to throw in my lifeventure cooking pot. It's been used and abused, cooked many a meal over an open fire over the years and is still as solid as ever, it's probably been used on average once a week over wood stove/open fire this year and it's still absolutely solid and doesn't even have a dent in it. The only complication is that lifeventure don't sell it anymore, but it is identical to the msr stowaway pot.
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,808
2,985
Mid Wales
But Erbsworst did not put it under MBT tracks.
I'd almost guarantee it would survive upside down. The weight of a tank is spread over a very large area - the actual ground pressure is surprisingly low compare to a wheeled vehicle. My driver could take the tank over a village green and, without looking very closely, you wouldn't know we had been there - partly driving skill of course but also very low ground pressure.
 
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TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,076
427
Vantaa, Finland
I know, that is the whole idea with tracks but for most people it is the 60-70 tn mass not the surface pressure. It does not work like that on all surfaces, some bogs just love to suck in tanks as does ice. It works well on others like driving over a normal car ... meaning tracks do their trick on even ground, on protrusions they exert the full load.
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,729
646
Berlin
Interesting to learn, but I am civilian.

In worst case scenarios I need the equipment to run like a rabbit, not as a battle equipment. So I am always pretty interested in lightweight stuff.

:)
 

Laurentius

Native
Aug 13, 2009
1,884
175
Knowhere
Difficult question. If you had set the bar at 20 year it may have been easier.. Thing is my flat was pretty much cleaned out in a burglary between the 30 and the 20 year mark.
 
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Mowmow

Forager
Jul 6, 2016
188
82
Nottinghamshire
I'd almost guarantee it would survive upside down. The weight of a tank is spread over a very large area - the actual ground pressure is surprisingly low compare to a wheeled vehicle. My driver could take the tank over a village green and, without looking very closely, you wouldn't know we had been there - partly driving skill of course but also very low ground pressure.
Aye ive followed the survival russia YouTube channel for years and he's got an unarmoured russian "gator" tracked vehicle, god knows what it's actually called but basically I heard the weight of the tank spread out on the tracks is supposedly less than an average man stood on one leg.
I hope that makes sense.

Also tracked vehicles are supposedly notorious for throwing tracks and maintenance and as was mentioned are still vulnerable to poor ground conditions.

But i wouldnt know from experience

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

Billy-o

Native
Apr 19, 2018
1,373
574
Canada
Bison Guide Shirt ... Meindl Borneos ... CR Sebenza ... Kifaru Pointman .... those possum and merino hats that Ray Mears sells too .. seem to last for ever. I have one from 2007 (?8) still perfectly happy as a hat
 

TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,076
427
Vantaa, Finland
I heard the weight of the tank spread out on the tracks is supposedly less than an average man stood on one leg.
Fairly OT. I once saw a comparison study of ground pressure of different vehicles in forest environment, the idea being that the less pressure the less damage to ground and tree roots. The poor horse ended up being worst and was deemed the destroyer of the forest. Now if anyone actually goes and looks at the ground after cutting it is the heavy but least pressure harvester that leaves the destruction. Hmmm... come to think of the elks, huge pressure on their cloven hoofs must shoot them all for destroying ...
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,729
646
Berlin
@Billy-o
I doubt that the Meindl Borneo will last 30 years. Perhaps Ortler, Perfekt and Super Perfekt, double stiched classical boots can become very old.

But the Borneo will latest after 15 years fall in pieces as far I am informed right. Usual shoes like this fall in pieces after 8 years in the wardrobe case.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,689
714
Lancashire
My last pair of Scarpa boots lasted less than a year. First lasted 10+years and only needed new soles but I decided to replace like for like. Those lasted 18 months. Struggling to understand that I bought a third pair of the same model of boots and got 9 months use. Between the first and second they redesigned the boots and made them better. Apparently!! Third pair was the exact same design as the second.... bin fodder from out of the shop!!!

There's a Settle based cobbler/shoemaker in the oldest traditions. He carves a last just for your foot from one inspection only. Then he keeps that last long after you've walked out in shoes or boots that fit perfectly. It's likely you'll only be back for resolving they're that good.

I often wonder if he could make boots for hiking use. Afterall people used to simply go out there even mountaineering in normal boots with perhaps hobnails in them for mountaineering.

Btw he learnt his trade from his family who were cobblers and shoemakers way down the generations. There's not many like him around!
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,729
646
Berlin
I think he is able to make mountain boots. The nowadays so called "orthopedic" shoemakers, the real old school shoemakers usually are able, but they just didn't discover the market, what in mountain areas is different.

Steinkogler in Austria offers for example double stiched Mountain boots in individual measures too. I got my individual measured Hiking boots from Geiger in Frittlingen. The best investment I ever did. And the best is, that the top model Geiger Bernina costs only approximately 150 € more as a similar Meindl Ortler Standard product.
 

Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,689
714
Lancashire
Think I'll get saving and pay the guy a visit before he retires. It's a hard, physical trade I understand. Read a broadsheet papers interview with that very guy once.
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,729
646
Berlin
It would be a phantasticly secure and independent job if an interested young man would learn it and specialise in double stiched mountain boots, based in UK.

Geiger needs already 12 month between measurement and delivery. And he doesn't make more PR than his pretty simple homepage.


(My Bernina boots are brown by the way and look like such boots looked 100 years ago.)
 
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Paul_B

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 14, 2008
4,689
714
Lancashire
Just googled the guy I'm thinking of. Found the little place called Settle has two shoe makers. One called Mark Slee, the other Dan Nelson. The latter is the one I read about in Yorkshire post.

Dan Nelson story.

The first one has a website and implies he worked for the other guy. If I'm guessing right Mr Slee apprenticed with Dan Nelson. If not then he certainly gives that impression with a comment on his website. Dan Nelson has no website but it's his store/ workshop I've looked into the window of and always wanted to try his services out. He's got old tools, lasts, old boots and other shoe maker paraphernalia.

I think the maker you link to has a better quality than one of the two I've found. It looks like a really good boot.
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,729
646
Berlin
Geiger makes high end quality.
The Bernina are middle heavy boots like Meindl Ortler, because Geiger sits in the Black forest area. Steinkogler offers such models as well as really heavy ones, similar to Meindl Perfekt and Super Perfekt and Austrian Army boots too.

I think every European shoemaker master can do it. But of course if one specialises in such boots it becomes cheaper.

As we usually visit our neighbours during our holidays it's of course an option to start it with an appointment with one of these shoemaker masters . Frittlingen is located pretty central in Europe, northern of Zürich in the area Villingen/ Schwenningen. Steinkogler sits in Ebensee between Salzburg and Linz.
Both are fantastic hiking areas.