BOMB PROOF EQUIPMENT

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cipherdias

Full Member
Jan 1, 2014
293
117
Wales
Can't believe no one's mentioned the 58 mug yet.
Those buggers are built like the proverbial.
Admittedly, mine isn't 30 years old (it was bought new about 10-15 years ago), but I reckon it will outlive the planet.
Dammit, I reckon I could build a whole city with it.
And it'll still be good to go.
The 58 mug is definitely one of the most bomb proof bits of kit ever.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,618
585
Berlin
I read about the 58 pattern bottle and got pretty confused.

At first the bcb crusader steel mug nested under it, the bottle grew, now the crusader steel mug replaces the plastic cup or what???
Can anyone explain it to me please?
 
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Wander

Nomad
Jan 6, 2017
469
503
Here There & Everywhere
Yes, it can be a bit of a pain.
Nowadays '58 mug/bottle' is more of a design name than a product name.
It refers to that mug/bottle combination used by the British army in the 60s onwards.
But not all '58' bottles and mugs are the same size or compatible (as you mention, the idea is that the bottle nestles in the mug).
You need to ensure you buy both items from the same manufacturer to ensure compatibility.
Mine are the Crusader ones.
The good thing about the (Crusader) 58 bottle is that it is 2 pints rather than 1 litre - so it holds just that little bit more. Beware that some '58' bottles are only 1 litre so if you put them in a bigger 58 mug they rattle around. Conversely, if you have a mug that is designed for a 1litre 58 bottle and try to fit a 2 pint 58 bottle in it, it won't fit.
I would just always aim for the Crusader ones and you know you'll be alright.
We've probably all been tripped up by the size variations in our time.
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,618
585
Berlin
Really? @SCOMAN

Did you smash it on a concrete plate or a rock? Or do you know such a YouTube video? For knifes I found a lot of videos where people tried to destroy them.

Such a bottle can fall on a street or a stone or a kitchen floor or on the floor of a public toilet or however.

I tend to buy the best equipment that I can get.
I have no scruple to invest a horrible amount of money to get the lightest stuff if it is durable and tough too, like the Hilleberg tents for example.

Is the Keith titanium canteen with nesting mug really shock proof?
 

SCOMAN

Full Member
Dec 31, 2005
2,162
224
50
Perthshire
Well despite my keenness to ensure I bought quality kit I have not smashed it on concrete or on a rock. I am an end user not a test facility. I will say in normal use, the cup and bottle a great, lightweigh, good size and has, by boiling, ensured I had clean water. I highly recommend them and have found a decent enough carrier for it and a few extra bits.
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,618
585
Berlin
That's nice to read.

But in normal use such bottles fall from a sink to a concrete floor, from the roof of a car down onto a street, from a table to the ground from one rock down to the other.
And real military bottles survive such treatment usually.

I also buy my stuff to use it, not to destroy it immediatly. But most of my camping kitchen stuff fell down such a distance in the last years. And most of my bottles fell down such distances too, often full.

That simply happens if you fill it in unknown bath rooms and kitchens at camping grounds and if you aren't always alone. Usually others smash my stuff down, not I myself.

I really would be interested to get informations about what happens if the full bottle falls, let's say 20 times from the roof of a Defender on a concrete plate.

That would be a realistic test for an expensive lightweight item.

A US GI bottle you can throw harder around of course, because it's made for that.



Which pouch do you use for the Keith canteen?
 
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punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
437
280
yorks
At Amazon somewhat misleading: "Good heat transfer performance". Realtive to what? Ti has slightly better heat conductivity than stainless steels but grossly inferior to Al.
from my experience, due to how thin they tend to be they heat stuff up quickly but also lose heat quickly. If you dordle when taking a sip expect a burnt lip! :O_O: to be fair I've had that from steel too.
 

TLM

Settler
Nov 16, 2019
930
350
66
Vantaa, Finland
I have had their small folding cups for some while and it almost belongs to the bombproof category. Mine have taken some use with no failures.

I am with Erbswurst in that most bushcraft and travelling items should take "normal" misuse (like dropping from reasonable heights) with no problems. If my vessels are under the tracks of a main battle tank I might have some other concerns too so a broken water bottle might be the least of them.
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,618
585
Berlin
Two years ago I bought 3 different civil stainless steel cups because they fitted in each other for car camping with my colleagues.
Of course I smashed the lightest immediatly on the concrete floor on a camping ground. Empty!
And I got a dent.

I was pretty surprised about it.

Of course this doesn't matter. But it was a warning to me about civil lightweight stuff.

I own a 750 ml titanium mug with butterfly handles and bail made by Toaks. (Later Tomshoo offered nearly the same one cheaper, by the way.)
I put it on my gas burner. The water was boiling. I switched off the gas and waited perhaps two minutes.
I could grap after it the handles without any pot holder cloth!

And I discovered that you don't burn your lips at titanium mugs!
It's like that:
With Aluminium mugs you always burn your lips, if the water isn't already frozen.
With steel mugs it's far better, they work well.
And the optimal metal mug is a titanium mug!
Mine I carry around every day since 4 or 5 years. I didn't get any problems with it and no dents. It fell from time to time too but not on concrete. But sometimes cooked meal sticks a bit at the ground. My burner is very small, I guess that's the main reason, because it's always just in the point where the small flame touches the pot.

So, for a cooking pot I am still a bit unsure if this is the best Idea. But for a mug titanium is without any doubt the best metal option.
 
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SCOMAN

Full Member
Dec 31, 2005
2,162
224
50
Perthshire
Fascinated by your determination to drop your kit on concrete. When you seen the subject header “Bombproof Equipment“ you do realise it’s just a turn of phrase. How much concrete do you encounter in the outdoors?