BOMB PROOF EQUIPMENT

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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
4,753
4,032
Mid Wales
As a matter of interest, how much is original ? Any 30+ year old Landy up here would be on chassis number 2 or 3.

My Trianga is 35 years old, and my Kelly kettle is about the same

Hardly, the Series 1 was 1948 (71 years old), my Series 3 is 1982 ( 37 years old). There were over a million Series 1, 2 & 3 vehicles produced between 1958 and 1985 so chassis numbers in the millions not single digits :)
 
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GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
1,445
690
Hardly, the Series 1 was 1948 (71 years old), my Series 3 is 1982 ( 37 years old). There were over a million Series 1, 2 & 3 vehicles produced between 1958 and 1985 so chassis numbers in the millions not single digits :)

Sadly the chassis don't like the road salt in my area. I recently re-chassied a 96 swb, now on its 3rd. (Galv this time) . I got one of the very last 88's new, which failed it's first mot because of chassis rot. It's predecessor (62) is still running with most of its chassis intact . Different quality metal perhaps. I collected an early 90 (swb)station wagon that had spent most of its time in and around Shrewsbury, and underneath, it was like new. These vehicles were all used as daily work tools, both on and off road, and worked hard without much sympathy or respect.
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
4,753
4,032
Mid Wales
Sadly the chassis don't like the road salt in my area. I recently re-chassied a 96 swb, now on its 3rd. (Galv this time) . I got one of the very last 88's new, which failed it's first mot because of chassis rot. It's predecessor (62) is still running with most of its chassis intact . Different quality metal perhaps. I collected an early 90 (swb)station wagon that had spent most of its time in and around Shrewsbury, and underneath, it was like new. These vehicles were all used as daily work tools, both on and off road, and worked hard without much sympathy or respect.

Ah, sorry, totally misunderstood your post :)
My 82 chassis is original and, at last inspection, rot free - confined to light duty now though.
 

Klenchblaize

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 25, 2005
2,586
125
62
Greensand Ridge
1960's Brno 22lr:
q2TFTY7.jpg

K
 

GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
1,445
690
Ah, sorry, totally misunderstood your post :)
My 82 chassis is original and, at last inspection, rot free - confined to light duty now though.

No need to apologize. I once committed the ultimate act of sacrilege, stuck the complete drive train from a Bedford KB26 4 X 4 (Isuzu) into a Series 1. ;)
 

MrEd

Full Member
Feb 18, 2010
1,838
703
Surrey/Sussex
www.thetimechamber.co.uk
As a matter of interest, how much is original ? Any 30+ year old Landy up here would be on chassis number 2 or 3.

My Trianga is 35 years old, and my Kelly kettle is about the same

Had a new wing (damaged off roading), it’s in its original chassis and I have only plated about 2 square inches on the rear x-member, new shocks and springs at various points, New engine (power upgrade, the other engine lives on in a series 3), new windscreen, various other minor bits like a steering box, wheel bearings, alternator etc and other bits that are normal to change.

Of course consumables are changed regularly - brakes etc but on the whole its the same vehicle, all the axles and major components (apart from engine) are all original.

It’s well looked after, well used but serviced well - including preventative maintenance rather than just reactive when stuff breaks.

I love it.
 
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Tiley

Full Member
Oct 19, 2006
2,130
210
57
Gloucestershire
I think that my nomination for bombproof piece of kit has to be my Victorinox SAK. I still love using the can opener and dislike the tendency for food companies using the ring-pull openers as they deny me my pleasure to a certain degree.

On the Landy debate, I think I will be branded as some sort of heretic. I have had three Defenders: one 110 and two 90s. I currently have a 90 which is my 'car', getting me to and from work and other little journeys locally. However, it is uncomfortable, leaks, is noisy and thirsty, is cold in winter (the heater takes ages to warm up), has a daftly large turning circle, is expensive to tax and maintain but, on those few occasions when it snows, it does allow me to get out on 'mercy missions' or get to work. Its shape is that of a vehicle drawn by a two-year-old and, because of its history, it has iconic status.

Maybe if I had more mechanical know-how and was able to tinker meaningfully with it, I would feel a greater sense of attachment but I don't and so I haven't. I sort of understand the 'iconic status' bit but, as a means of transport, mostly on roads, it is a l-o-n-g way from ideal. Why do I keep it? Habit and the mantra from meine Sturmbahnfuhrer that buying 'a new car' (i.e. any car other than the one I've got) is such a waste of money. So, I remain committed to sitting in my rattling metal box until I win a meaningful amount in the National Lottery...
 

GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
1,445
690
On the Landy debate, I think I will be branded as some sort of heretic.

He He. My problems vanished overnight when I bought a Hi-Lux. 100,000 miles, 6000 mile services and consumables, one timing belt, and an exhaust system. And the heater in that small but comfortable and soundproof cab, "toasty". ;)

The Scotish Hydro electric engineers have Merc 4 x 4 vans. Now they might make an interesting conversion.
 
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MrEd

Full Member
Feb 18, 2010
1,838
703
Surrey/Sussex
www.thetimechamber.co.uk
I think that my nomination for bombproof piece of kit has to be my Victorinox SAK. I still love using the can opener and dislike the tendency for food companies using the ring-pull openers as they deny me my pleasure to a certain degree.

On the Landy debate, I think I will be branded as some sort of heretic. I have had three Defenders: one 110 and two 90s. I currently have a 90 which is my 'car', getting me to and from work and other little journeys locally. However, it is uncomfortable, leaks, is noisy and thirsty, is cold in winter (the heater takes ages to warm up), has a daftly large turning circle, is expensive to tax and maintain but, on those few occasions when it snows, it does allow me to get out on 'mercy missions' or get to work. Its shape is that of a vehicle drawn by a two-year-old and, because of its history, it has iconic status.

Maybe if I had more mechanical know-how and was able to tinker meaningfully with it, I would feel a greater sense of attachment but I don't and so I haven't. I sort of understand the 'iconic status' bit but, as a means of transport, mostly on roads, it is a l-o-n-g way from ideal. Why do I keep it? Habit and the mantra from meine Sturmbahnfuhrer that buying 'a new car' (i.e. any car other than the one I've got) is such a waste of money. So, I remain committed to sitting in my rattling metal box until I win a meaningful amount in the National Lottery...

Yep hence why mine is a second vehicle, although I do all my own maintenance and work on it so that keeps costs down and things like the heater working etc as I can keep on top of those bits.

Very simple vehicle but it has A LOT of moving parts that need proactive attention
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,694
1,039
Berlin
I love the Defender too. My brother has one and I can compare it with many other 4×4 cars, because my uncle collected them.

But I mainly hoped to learn here something about hiking and camping equipment.

Don't you own bushcraft equipment that became old?

When I asked, I expected to get a long list of bomb proof surplus stuff, knives, axes, cotton tents and similar civil stuff, that could be a orientation for those who have to buy new or to replace old equipment.
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
5,126
1,653
W.Sussex
He He. My problems vanished overnight when I bought a Hi-Lux. 100,000 miles, 6000 mile services and consumables, one timing belt, and an exhaust system. And the heater in that small but comfortable and soundproof cab, "toasty". ;)

The Scotish Hydro electric engineers have Merc 4 x 4 vans. Now they might make an interesting conversion.

Too right, I’ve always loved the classic 90 and 110, but never bought one, they’re just too agricultural and high maintenance for my “real” needs. I did buy a Toyota, and in the 10 years I’ve had it, apart from one expensive job, it’s cost me next to nothing to run. I’ve done naff all except basic stuff, tyres, wiper blades, liquids, so I reckon they’re pretty bombproof. That Hilux on Top Gear certainly was.

I’m currently looking at getting on the road with my good lady and a couple of terriers and simply pointing the vehicle in a direction. Whether it’ll be a Landcruiser, Hilux, Shogun type vehicle or a 4x4 camper I’m not sure yet. I had some good times in a Toyota Townace too, it did off-road things I didn’t expect it to be able to do, out performed a Landrover on one occasion.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,270
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Knives can last forever, unless you use them as tools.
The problem owning and using old equipment ( I have most of my 1970's era stuff in fully working order) is that you never try the new cool stuff.

I forced myself to buy the Optimus multifuel burner last year, as I felt I had to become a Modern Man. ( and had problem finding quality Ethanol)
Is it better than my old Trangia? Now. Fiddly. At least a Chinese factory got some business, and a Chinese worker got money to spend.

Old stuff that still works is still with us because of super quality. The old stuff that got thrown away was junk and badly made.

Not everything made in the past was good. Most stuff was rubbish.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,694
1,039
Berlin
I opened the thread because I hoped to get informations about old stuff that is still available, like the Trangia kitchen, Ortlieb dry bags or the Victorinox knifes, or can be found second hand, like a swedish made old Fjälräven rucksack or a lot of army surplus.

I own loads of incredible old stuff. But I don't want to ask here a question and then answer it myself immediately.
And off course my stuff is usually made in Germany. I hoped to learn something about your British stuff, Jannes swedish stuff as well of course, and other stuff too.

I don't believe, that you all buy your stuff once more every season from Aldi.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,270
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
The civilian Optimus alcohol fuelled set I got once dad stopped using it, is a ’copy’ of the Trangia, works well. Hard Aluminium, fashionably dented, but fully usable.
The Trangia I have since my army times is made from thin, very soft Aluminium. I do not how many I replaced during my 3 years in the service.
Crushed beyond repair. It was made that way so it could be fixed ( dents pushed out) in the field.

I also have a couple of dads Mora knives he has used since I guess the late 60’. Wooden handles, fiber scabbards.
Swedish imprint on the blades.
 
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Hultafors Outdoor knife for Sale

We have a a number of Hultafors Outdoor Knives with Firesteels for sale.

You can see more details here in this thread OUTDOOR KNIVES The price is £27 posted to the UK. Pay via the paypal button below.