Bivvy recommendation

hughlle1

Nomad
Nov 4, 2015
297
7
London
Hello all.

It's been a while! Despite the criticisms, I survived my outing last year without a problem :) so now I'm thinking of different persuits.

Just wondering if anyone has any recommendations for a bivvy. Be it army surplus or whatnot. Beyond needing to fit a sleeping bag and bog standard roll up sleeping mat, I'm just after something that'll handle the south west UK at this time of year, such as exmoor.

Never had one (although my hammock can double up as one) but just want something I can chuck in a bag and comfortably spend the night where ever I might feel is appropriate. Despite looking to use this in winter, I'm a hot sleeper, so can probably get by with less than Arctic rated gear! Hot sleeper, just hot. I hike in 5-10 degree weather in a T shirt as I overheat so rapidly.
 

Rabbit leg

Forager
Nov 9, 2016
117
55
UK and world
Army surplus. Heavier. Tougher. Very roomy so no sleeping bag compression. You can bring a small bag and boots inside. Sub £50. If you contact the seller you can usually get a new one sent.
If it is too big or heavy, you can trim it down and seam seal it.

Brand name >£200.
 
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RaoTao

Member
Jan 4, 2016
15
5
37
United Kingdom
Who told you that? Paratex is exactly like gore tex. Gore tex is a great brand though not the only technology out there. I'm sure there are better options out there. But for the pack size and weight, snugpak sf is a winner
I don't think Hunka and Snugpak are fully waterproof and don't come close to Gortex. Hence the price.

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SCOMAN

Full Member
Dec 31, 2005
2,202
260
50
Perthshire
Here's a link to my blog post following a night in the Carinthia observer bivvy.
https://packyrbag.com/2018/12/06/bi...-you-like-but-a-tarp-would-have-beeen-a-boon/
I used a brit mil surplus (£35 on eBay brand spanking new) during my Woodlore Fundamental course and it was great. Simple and you can fit your sleep mat inside or outside. Key is the tarp though and using one on Exmoor with few tress will rely on you using walking poles or similar.
 

hughlle1

Nomad
Nov 4, 2015
297
7
London
Thanks for the replies guys. It is indeed a bivvy bag I'm after. I've a tiny tent, but looking for something more discrete and portable. As unsavory a position as it might be, I'm done with the whole legal approach, and intend to just hike and kip where I can. I understand the purpose of getting people to seek camp sites etc, but I'm responsible, don't plan to cause havock, take out what I bring in, and as such I want to be able to enjoy the outdoors without worrying about getting back to the car and drive home for bed time! As someone suffering from depression, I just want to make the outdoors as approachable and viable as possible! Mods are free to delete the thread if I'm painting things in a bad light.

That said, a bivvy and tarp should be more than enough. The places I tend to frequent on exmoor and the mendips are largely rife with trees and seems everywhere I look there are large scale (presumably DOE etc) attempts of making survival shelters from fallen branches. Just trying to stay sane amd enjoy the outdoors.
 

SCOMAN

Full Member
Dec 31, 2005
2,202
260
50
Perthshire
Enjoy and be careful chum. Theres a lot to be said for an occasional rebalance in the outdoors, I've kept myself in the same job this last two years by utilising my nights away to be a camp and chill rather than another night in a crappy hotel.
 

RaoTao

Member
Jan 4, 2016
15
5
37
United Kingdom
Hey man, I'm with you on that. Nothing like throwing yourself to the elements to slow things down and focus on what is really important. An idea of self reliance equates to self worth in my eyes. A bit of a human experience. Hammock and bivi wild camping is a soul filling experience. Especially in the morning. Gotta get that sleep kit sorted though. Keep at feeling better and leave no trace
Thanks for the replies guys. It is indeed a bivvy bag I'm after. I've a tiny tent, but looking for something more discrete and portable. As unsavory a position as it might be, I'm done with the whole legal approach, and intend to just hike and kip where I can. I understand the purpose of getting people to seek camp sites etc, but I'm responsible, don't plan to cause havock, take out what I bring in, and as such I want to be able to enjoy the outdoors without worrying about getting back to the car and drive home for bed time! As someone suffering from depression, I just want to make the outdoors as approachable and viable as possible! Mods are free to delete the thread if I'm painting things in a bad light.

That said, a bivvy and tarp should be more than enough. The places I tend to frequent on exmoor and the mendips are largely rife with trees and seems everywhere I look there are large scale (presumably DOE etc) attempts of making survival shelters from fallen branches. Just trying to stay sane amd enjoy the outdoors.

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Bushcraftsman

Native
Apr 12, 2008
1,368
5
Derbyshire
Just a note from my experience - the Snugpak SF Bivy is indeed TINY and good value for money. However it's a total sweat box. It is not very breathable at all; myself and a couple of friends all got rid of ours due to moisture build up on the inside and subsequently wetting our sleeping bags. Alright for 1 night or if you're going somewhere that you can dry it out, but for longer trips or potentially bad weather I'd opt for the army surplus one. Yes it's bigger/heavier but it's absolutely bombproof, plenty of room inside and is a lot more breathable. Another note is the SF is very thin, so if you have a delicate matt under you (I have a neoair xlite, which has a paper thin wall thickness) I'd be constantly worried about puncturing it - definitely don't have that issue in the surplus one
 
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RaoTao

Member
Jan 4, 2016
15
5
37
United Kingdom
Just a note from my experience - the Snugpak SF Bivy is indeed TINY and good value for money. However it's a total sweat box. It is not very breathable at all; myself and a couple of friends all got rid of ours due to moisture build up on the inside and subsequently wetting our sleeping bags. Alright for 1 night or if you're going somewhere that you can dry it out, but for longer trips or potentially bad weather I'd opt for the army surplus one. Yes it's bigger/heavier but it's absolutely bombproof, plenty of room inside and is a lot more breathable. Another note is the SF is very thin, so if you have a delicate matt under you (I have a neoair xlite, which has a paper thin wall thickness) I'd be constantly worried about puncturing it - definitely don't have that issue in the surplus one
Waterproof to a fault I guess. It has that slightly rubberised feel on inside. I am yet to encounter any out of the ordinary moisture levels so far. But then have only used it in colder conditions where hammock is a cold butt scenario.

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tiger stacker

Native
Dec 30, 2009
1,178
40
Glasgow
Just a note from my experience - the Snugpak SF Bivy is indeed TINY and good value for money. However it's a total sweat box. It is not very breathable at all; myself and a couple of friends all got rid of ours due to moisture build up on the inside and subsequently wetting our sleeping bags. Alright for 1 night or if you're going somewhere that you can dry it out, but for longer trips or potentially bad weather I'd opt for the army surplus one. Yes it's bigger/heavier but it's absolutely bombproof, plenty of room inside and is a lot more breathable. Another note is the SF is very thin, so if you have a delicate matt under you (I have a neoair xlite, which has a paper thin wall thickness) I'd be constantly worried about puncturing it - definitely don't have that issue in the surplus one
would that be the stratosphere or the ionosphere?
 

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,959
720
Berlin
I recommend the SNUGPACK SPECIAL FORCES BIVVY BAG. 340g

I had before the british army goretex bivvy bag. 800g if I am right. In the summer I let it at home, where it usually stood, when it began to rain....

The SF bivvy bag weights only 340g. If its hot, you can open it with the zipp, if it's cold you can urinate out of it, without leaving the sleeping bag.

I combine it usually with the Snugpack Special Forces 1 Sleeping bag. That works phantastic.
I store the sleeping bag in the bivvy bag and both directly in an olive green Ortlieb ultra light dry sack 7 litres, that's perfect!

German army foldable mat on the ground, in one rusch the bed out of the dry sack, boots of, jump in, good night!
Ready to sleep in one and a half minute.

In combination with the Snugpack Jungle bag it doesn't convince me. Works, but the zippers should be in the same position: Central!

And with it a Defcon 5 poncho, 400g.

That is ultra light high quality stuff!
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,959
720
Berlin
Thank you!

But: The second link doesn't work here too.

Perhaps they are working at the side in this night???

Or it's a post Christmas - business desaster?