Bivvy Bags...worth it?

Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
1,747
655
Berlin
I never thought about that. But I usually hide myself under a Bush or put myself next to a hedge to make sure that I stay invisible and nobody can roll over me in the morning.
From gardening I know that this practis helps a few degrees, especially because it keeps the wind away.
 
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Alder

New Member
Aug 7, 2014
2
0
Utrecht, Holland
In forest area's I don't see much added benefit for a bivy, just a tarp, mattress and sleeping bag are enough. In the open/mountain trekkings I much prefer a lightweight tent. I simply haven't come to a situation were I would need a bivy.
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
547
370
yorks
I like em. I have a battered up endicotts surplus one.

They are a bit like wearing a hardshell jacket if that makes sense. A good wind blocker and rain/water protection for your sleeping bag. I've done a couple of bivvies in dry but cold (like 0 degrees) weather and I'm positive they act as a great wind barrier.
 

marcoruhland

Full Member
Apr 23, 2020
25
11
Germany
i do not use classic bivy bag but some with more benefit
1. carinthia observer plus gore-tex (less condensation in winter condition) my smallest "tent" nothing for cocking inside but more space over your head than a normal bivy and a very small silhouette so no-one will find you
2. helsport fjellduk pro / x-trem multifunktion poncho, bivy, sittingbag for hunting - x-trem is the thermo version so its also an solo summer sleepingbag or pimp up a normal sleeping bag to a winter version

3. jerven i own different version extreme orange for rescue amazing 170g/m2 so with full winter clothing this can save your life inside the bag normally its not under 20°c (if you do not sleep ) - king size two person version or for a large guy like me in combination with my savotta yukon its proofed up to -35°c and the possibility with extra flaps to convert into a tent

video helsport vs. jerven

mr
 

DocG

Full Member
Dec 20, 2013
725
51
Moray
Great discussion to read over breakfast. Thanks for sharing everyone.
I know it's a heavy option, but I like a tarp & bivvi bag combo. Someone noted that Paul Kirtley suggested Snugpak + down bag to reduce weight: I have used that a lot, including in winter. When I first received the Snugpak SF bivvi I almost sent it straight back - seemed to be a glorified bin bag. However, I seem to have been lucky and got a good one. Mine is green and no zip. I use it with a DD 3x3 tarp or a smaller silnylon one (surplus store special offer). I also have an issue bag that's very reliable and much harder-wearing. With care I have both enjoyed and endured the Highlands year round with this kit - though I do use a tent in severe weather.
I think that the protection from wind and dew are the bivvi's biggest advantages.
My main motivation for enduring the less pleasant nights is the wonderful sights that surround me - I've seen the Northern Lights, reindeer, pine martens, foxes, badgers, various species of deer, squirrels (pillaging my cereal once), amazing sunsets and sunrises plus many other faces of nature and the environment while secure in my bivvi under a tarp.
(I'm trying out hammocks too - but that's another story...)
Whatever you do, enjoy doing it with the kit you trust. I hope we can all return to the outdoors soon.
Keep safe and smiling.
 
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Erbswurst

Native
Mar 5, 2018
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Berlin
@DocG

Do you have to air out the down bag every morning seperately, or can you keep the down bag in the Snugpak bivvy bag like I do it with the - also pretty light and compact- Snugpack Special Forces 1 sleeping bag? I can use this combination for several days and put it immediately in its dry bag in the morning.
The moisture doesn't add from day to day. The system stays dry enough to use it, even if used in light showers and packed whet at the outside.

Snugpak offers the normal bivvy bag and the Special Forces bivvy bag. The difference between both is that the SF has the zipper.

Tarp and Snugpak bivvy bag aren't heavy, if you choose a lightweight tarp like Hilleberg or DD offer them for example.

I use a 340g Snugpak SF bivvy bag in combination with a 350g Defcon 5 military poncho. 690g are pretty light for a storm proof shelter system!

In central European summer conditions I don't take an additional rain suit with me. Bivvy bag and military poncho are the lightest option you can choose in each fabric quality.

 

DocG

Full Member
Dec 20, 2013
725
51
Moray
I usually air my kit while I'm sorting out the morning, but on wet days I will stuff the sleep system (minus pad) into a bag. My zipless bivvi was sold as SF - but it may have been mid-labelled. Can't say I'm really concerned.
Thanks for posting Kirtley's comments.
 

SaraR

Full Member
Mar 25, 2017
564
335
Ceredigion
Great discussion to read over breakfast. Thanks for sharing everyone.
I know it's a heavy option, but I like a tarp & bivvi bag combo. Someone noted that Paul Kirtley suggested Snugpak + down bag to reduce weight: I have used that a lot, including in winter. When I first received the Snugpak SF bivvi I almost sent it straight back - seemed to be a glorified bin bag. However, I seem to have been lucky and got a good one. Mine is green and no zip. I use it with a DD 3x3 tarp or a smaller silnylon one (surplus store special offer). I also have an issue bag that's very reliable and much harder-wearing. With care I have both enjoyed and endured the Highlands year round with this kit - though I do use a tent in severe weather.
I think that the protection from wind and dew are the bivvi's biggest advantages.
My main motivation for enduring the less pleasant nights is the wonderful sights that surround me - I've seen the Northern Lights, reindeer, pine martens, foxes, badgers, various species of deer, squirrels (pillaging my cereal once), amazing sunsets and sunrises plus many other faces of nature and the environment while secure in my bivvi under a tarp.
(I'm trying out hammocks too - but that's another story...)
Whatever you do, enjoy doing it with the kit you trust. I hope we can all return to the outdoors soon.
Keep safe and smiling.
It love how with a tarp you can have it higher up while you're "up" with loads of headroom and unimpeded views and then you can move it lower down for sleeping to get more protection against wind and rain. And when you get up in the morning you can move it back up or at least tilt it a bit to give yourself more room for breakfast.