Best thing for finger bandaging.

The Frightful

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Apr 21, 2020
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For years I have been a firm believer in Micropore. It is so porous that one can leave it on for a long time. It gets dirty but with some use of an antiseptic it can be kept on until it wears off or the wound is no more a problem.

Having been an onsite bricklayer for 30 odd years I regularly, quite literally wore out my fingers drawing blood on the abrasive bricks. Micropore was a life saver enabling me to continue just topping it up as and when. At the end of the day when removed my digits were not too soft and peppy either. I always keep a roll in my van as well as my kit alongside my sudocrem (magic cream ! )
 
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bigbeewee

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Dec 18, 2010
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Having been an onsite bricklayer for 30 odd years I regularly, quite literally wore out my fingers drawing blood on the abrasive bricks. Micropore was a life saver enabling me to continue just topping it up as and when. At the end of the day when removed my digits were not too soft and peppy either. I always keep a roll in my van as well as my kit alongside my sudocrem (magic cream ! )

genuine question, why do timeserved brickies not wear gloves. I have a friend who said he doesn’t wear gloves because his dad also a brickie always pooh hoo’d the idea.

you can get alsorts of technical gloves nowadays and what we know about contact dermatitis and cement is well founded

is it just an old school culture thing?

I put thin coated handling jobs on whenever I even go in the back garden never mind chucking coarse grain bricks and mortar around all day
 
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Toddy

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Jan 21, 2005
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I wondered that too. I watched the roofers redoing our house and their hands were a mess. I worked hard but I wore the thin coated gloves while doing it, and I still use them in the garden now.
I bought them in packs of 12 pairs from Arco for under a tenner.
They even sell them in a range of sizes, and their size 6 ones are a good fit on me :) Usually gloves are far too big, so finding ones that really worked well is a blessing. I bought size 8 for Himself and again, they fit well, none of this too short rub at the inside of the knuckles of the pinkie/ringfinger, or the horrible hard seam at the base of the fingers of the cheapo leather 'work' gloves.
Hard wearing, easy to wash and dry.


M
 

The Frightful

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Apr 21, 2020
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Essex
Back in the day gloves were not fit for purpose and would snag the line continuously. I tried marigolds but were cold in winter sweaty in the summer. Tape was the way to go. Today however gloves are sleek enough not to snag the line, coincidentally i laid a few today wearing just those and they were fine. Brickies dont just lay bricks, with concrete blocks for example i get a bit of slippage within the gloves due to the weight.
 
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Tony

White bear (Admin)
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Apr 16, 2003
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Yeah, gloves are so much better now, when I used to work on building sites etc they were a nightmare, now though you can find them that fit well and grip well.

I think a bit of it is that you had tough hands, gloves definitely make them softer, I'm not saying it was good to have them bashed to bits but they would be tough and wear resistant from use.
 

Gary Elson

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Feb 27, 2007
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Bulkington Warwickshire
I use the H-shaped plasters (fabric if poss) for knuckles and finger tips, they bend where you need them and keep the tip closed up. Finger cots are great over the top for water proofing too
I do similar but make my own
Get a big ordinary plaster and cut a slit through the sticky bit bout half way across up to the dressing bit you then have 4 sticky tails which wrap round a knuckle or finger tip very nice
Then if needed a wrap of tape - any tape !
 
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DocG

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Dec 20, 2013
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I'm with Dave Budd too. I went on a remote first aid course where one of the instructors dished out packs of 50 knuckle plasters (of a type he called "industrial strength" - can't get at any right now so can't remember brand name) and told us to bin anything else in the plaster line apart from some micropore and gorilla tape.
I've also found that sniper tape works well to keep dressings in place.

Separate note - please will earlier posters renew links to products: none works on my phone. Thanks. I'm always looking for new answers to old problems. Thanks to all who've shared on this thread.