ash dieback

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greg.g

Full Member
May 20, 2015
231
49
birmingham
Unfortunately one of the trees at our new property is a rather poorly Ash.
Its a grand old tree with a base diameter in excess of 1m
We moved into this house in early March, just before the lockdown started. As you would expect the trees were bare but soon started to produce pollen and early shoots. Once the leaves started to appear, they soon turned black and wilted.
I have looked up the symptoms on line and its almost certainly ash dieback.
We will have to get specialists in to remove the tree. No easy task as its pretty close to a summer house down near the end of our garden. It is on a steep valley but bordering the end of our property is a horse paddock so it may be possible to get access via there. Such a shame to have to see the tree go though.
As a side issue, we do have 2 wood burning stoves here. Would it be possible for us to salvage some of the logs or does it all have to be removed and destroyed?
Not a problem that expected to have:(
 
Last edited:

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,368
2,560
Mid Wales
Ash dieback does not have to be removed; it's all over the country now. It's fine for logging and use in the wood burner. We have it in one of our woods - all the young saplings develop it, die back, then re-shoot from the base the next year. The advice at the moment is, unless the tree is in a dangerous position (could fall onto a road or onto the house etc.) to leave it up - it provides a decaying habitat for wildlife and there is a possibility that some trees will live through it. I appreciate that a tree in a garden may need to come down though. There's still good timber in an infected tree that can be used for more than burning as well.
 
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greg.g

Full Member
May 20, 2015
231
49
birmingham
Thanks for that. One of the first things I did when we moved in was to fit a bat box on the tree. We do like to encourage wild life.
Very happy here though in Wales. Best thing we ever did :)
 
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slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,079
148
Devon
I gather the most risky material with ash die back is the leaf litter and small twigs. They carry the spores and reinfect the tree. I've seen it suggested you should clear them away if you have a specific tree you wish to save but in a woodland setting it's unrealistic. I've not heard of any problems transporting the logs and if there was keeping them on site would be ideal.

The latest I've read is that single trees are more likely to survive than dense areas of ash trees. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-52582304
 

slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,079
148
Devon
I have quite a few and most, if not all, show signs of ADB. Some are virtually dead, others growing ok but look stressed and a few look fine. I'm removing the worst offenders and hoping that'll leave room for the more resistant ones.
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
313
195
yorks
Ash dieback thrives in leaf litter, so clearing any dropped ash leaves and twigs will help to eliminate spores.

Anything that favours the healthy growth of the Ash will help too.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,368
2,560
Mid Wales
Ash dieback thrives in leaf litter, so clearing any dropped ash leaves and twigs will help to eliminate spores.

Anything that favours the healthy growth of the Ash will help too.
You'd think, but in a garden with one or two ash there's little point - they either have it or not, and in a woodland it's an impossible task. It's not on the recommended action list published by any of the woodland/forest associations that I get regular information from. I know it sounds defeatist but ADB is here and everywhere; we can only hope that some trees have the ability to withstand it or live through it and a gene pool of tolerant trees emerges.

In the mean time we are advised to plan for alternative planting.
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
313
195
yorks
I know what you mean - the only reason I say is I did a tree disease course with the woodland trust 2 years ago and that is what the course leader had said.
 

greg.g

Full Member
May 20, 2015
231
49
birmingham
Fingers crossed.
The tree is now sprouting new leaves on most branches. As yet, no sight of them wilting or turning black.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,368
2,560
Mid Wales
Fingers crossed.
The tree is now sprouting new leaves on most branches. As yet, no sight of them wilting or turning black.
I'm afraid they do. Quite a few of the saplings I have are completely dead from six inches up but have new shoots growing from the bottom. Larger ones are sprouting new shoots and branches 2 metres up but are completely dead above 3 metres. A few more mature ones (15 years old) have one side completely dead but alive on one main branch.

The oldest tree that is showing signs of it is 25 years old and that has a few branches that have died back but otherwise looks healthy.