Advice on a Bushcraft Canoe Trip in Sweden?

forest_girl

Forager
Nov 29, 2016
105
2
Edinburgh
Any recommended places for canoeing and practicing bushcraft in Sweden? Ive done some searches on songs of the paddle but the focus over there seems to be large amounts of kit ad not much on bushcraft stuff like fire rules and use of natural materials.

I'll be going at the beginning of August for about 10 days with a friend and my main requirements of the trip are:

Wilderness - Somehwere not very busy, and where we wont be coming across summer cabins and signs of other people regularly

Accessable - I understand this is at odds with wilderness, but we'd need to be able to get a bus or train there.

Canoe Hire - One day I would like an Ally folding canoe but until then I'll need to hire

Wood - I'd like to be able to do a bit of wood craft, make some pot hangers and maybe carve a paddle. I know a lot of national parks provide split wood at lean to's and so don't allow chopping of own wood.

Fire - I understand that In august open fires while wild camping are not allowed, but would I be allowed to use a hobo stick stove? I just don't like using fuel stoves, i know its silly but they do soil thing for me.

Anyone been and have any recommendations? I know what I'm asking is slightly unrealistic, I'm willing to compromise between accessibility/practicality and freedom/wilderness, I just wanted some advice or first hand experience of paddling and primarily bushcrafting in Sweden.

I think my perfect canoeing location would be Quetico/Boundry Waters on the Ontario/Minnesota border but I can't afford a trip all the way over there!! One day maybe!

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,584
653
Bedfordshire
Probably not wilderness enough for you, and in August I would think it could be pretty busy, but Stora Le has rail access, canoe rental, a small town with supermarket within walking distance of canoe site, some DANO shelters up the lake, but with just two of you, I don't think you have to stay at them. You are right about fires though. Also, land owners along the lake were complaining to the canoe operators about tourists hacking up their forest along the lake shore. Saw evidence of rather indiscriminate axe use, so can't say I blame locals for being annoyed. If you walk inland a bit, and are a little more careful there was lots of wood, many beaver felled trees too ;)

My reports:
http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=62240

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=132250

Although I say there are cottages on the lake shore, I didn't really try to keep them out of pictures, and you don't see many in the attached photos, so you best judge for yourself :)

I mention fires in the second report, but don't know about hobo stoves. I took my Bushbuddy with me but didn't use it much since I was with a big group. Canodal hire out Trangias, which are more of a fire risk than bottle gas, but don't have the ember issue. Best thing would be to contact the folk in the area. With the time of year you are going I would not be surprised if they don't want fires, even little ones, but it could be worth asking.

Worth remembering that a lot of the fuel around there is pine and spruce, chance of finding birch suitable for fire wood is slim, unless it was felled for the purpose. Those fuels really soot stuff up in stick stoves. No problem if you are trained on Scots Pine and are expecting it.
 

C_Claycomb

Mod
Mod
Oct 6, 2003
5,584
653
Bedfordshire
Come on folk, someone else must have a good suggestion or two! Don't let my barely useful post hang there as the last word on this thread! :D
 

forest_girl

Forager
Nov 29, 2016
105
2
Edinburgh
I'm looking at Stora Le, it seems at that time of year crowds and land use restrictions are inevitable wherever you are so I may as well make it easy to get to, use the DANO shelters and enjoy it for what it is, a bit of paddling and a bit of camping.

I was looking the adjacent lake system just over the Norwegian border which looks a little quieter but I've decided if I'm going to do a real wilderness trip I'd rather it be a longer trip after the fire ban is lifted in september. The youtube channel Norwegian Woods operates from that area and it does look very very pretty!

I was also looking at canoeing lake Saimaa in Finland, much more extensive lake and archipelago system with some secluded corners but its more expensive to get to and to hire when there. The fire ban also still applies at this time of year anyway.
 

Riven

Full Member
Dec 23, 2006
354
61
53
Nottinghamshire
Surprised none of the Swedish members have not replied so far but for what its worth my wife and I went over four years around June, before it got too busy. We flew over so took minimal camping kit and hired a car so we could cover more area as suited us and the weather. We stayed on campsites and wildcamped, hired canoes and camped on islands as well as hiking through beatiful forests. Stugas are usually quite reasonable to hire per night and are worth considering if you need to dry out for a day or two as we did in 2007 when it rained most of the two weeks. The Dano shelters are good but getting one when its a busy time could be difficult. A quick search online should put you in touch with some places to hire canoe and equipment including barrels to keep things dry.
On the plus side its a beatiful place and the people are not only very friendly but usually speak excellent English.
www.camping.se is a good start for info on sites etc.
Goodluck, Riven.


sweden.jpg

Our campsite on a small island on Vastra Silen.
 
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steve a

Settler
Oct 2, 2003
811
4
south bedfordshire
I've been here a few times http://www.nordkanot.se/starteng.html . The canoe centre is ran by a gentleman named Preben who knows the area very well and will point you to less busy areas of the lake system, he also runs various bushcraft courses covering both summer and winter environments. He also speaks very good English. Well worth a look in my opinion