Lure fishing/spinning in the sea and fresh water.

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WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
Hi,
I’ve recently bought one of the Shimano STC spinning rods (2.4m assembled, and a casting limit of 100g), but I’ve had no luck catching anything yet. I’m in the South East of England, so have plenty of coast to choose from.

I’m just after some help with general technique, lures, knowing where and when to try lures, etc. Does it need to be fairly calm for the fish to see the spoon/wedge? Is deep water at a full tide best?

Any help would be much appreciated,

Cheers.
 

Decacraft

Full Member
Jul 28, 2021
32
12
35
South Wales
When I used to sea fish I would go 3 hours either side of the high tide. I found that most productive in coastal West Wales. I used to get an annual tide book from the local tackle shop which gave me all the times and tide heights etc.

It can be dangerous if there's a high tide or the conditions are known to be rough, if its a certain venue have you tried googling it? The sea fishing world is massive, and I would be suprised if there were little info on a particular place.

Times of year, weather, fish species and casting/retrieving technique all play a part in lure selection. Depending on the species present in the area/time of year you may be at a lesser chance of catching with a lure and would be more suited with baits.


What venue are you going to? Do you know what species of fish are present or targeted?

Overfishing( if its a high pressured water) would also have an impact.

Over the last 3 years I have gotten more into BFS (bait-finesse systems) which means small lures designed in Japan for fishing areas where people are constantly fishing- smaller lures more attractive to the fish. Have had success with a range from trout, perch, pike, bass and Mackrell.

Hope this helps somewhat
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
996
819
yorks
Just had a quick look on Google maps at the south east coast. I think the main problem with using lures there is probably the lack of water clarity.

I've caught on wedges in rough weather but they do tend to work better with a bit of calmer water when the sun is out from my past experience.

Can you give us a range on the South East coast, say from the most easterly town the the most westerly, and perhaps we can suggest somewhere to try.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,214
4,561
Mid Wales
I have fished since I was a kid but, to be honest, I'm no expert as I don't get out enough. My most successful spinning fishing (actually my most successful fishing) has always been on the rocky west coast when the tide is rushing in and the water crashing against the rocks - find a run and cast into it retrieving fast. BUT - this is the most dangerous type of fishing I know - fast water, crashing waves and incoming tide can lead to being swept off the rocks.
 

Decacraft

Full Member
Jul 28, 2021
32
12
35
South Wales
Water clarity would have little affect to lures, they give vibrations in the water which mimmicks injured baitfish- more often than not a predator fish will attack on sense, other than if it sees it and attacks it. Its more 'instinct'.

It's possibly due to the species of fish present not regarded as fish that can not be caught with lures, as some will ignore it in favour of actual baits with scents and juices.

Pollack, wrasse, bass, mackrel are the common fish caught with lures

Dogfish, cod, codling, Congor eel, Ray, taupe, smoothhounds, flounder all on actual baits in my experience.

Tide conditions would have the greatest impact on fishing over any other imho
 

WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
When I used to sea fish I would go 3 hours either side of the high tide. I found that most productive in coastal West Wales. I used to get an annual tide book from the local tackle shop which gave me all the times and tide heights etc.

It can be dangerous if there's a high tide or the conditions are known to be rough, if its a certain venue have you tried googling it? The sea fishing world is massive, and I would be suprised if there were little info on a particular place.

Times of year, weather, fish species and casting/retrieving technique all play a part in lure selection. Depending on the species present in the area/time of year you may be at a lesser chance of catching with a lure and would be more suited with baits.


What venue are you going to? Do you know what species of fish are present or targeted?

Overfishing( if its a high pressured water) would also have an impact.

Over the last 3 years I have gotten more into BFS (bait-finesse systems) which means small lures designed in Japan for fishing areas where people are constantly fishing- smaller lures more attractive to the fish. Have had success with a range from trout, perch, pike, bass and Mackrell.

Hope this helps somewhat

I’d like to get some bass, ideally, but at the moment a whelk would be a start.

Thanks for the help, mate.
 

WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
Just had a quick look on Google maps at the south east coast. I think the main problem with using lures there is probably the lack of water clarity.

I've caught on wedges in rough weather but they do tend to work better with a bit of calmer water when the sun is out from my past experience.

Can you give us a range on the South East coast, say from the most easterly town the the most westerly, and perhaps we can suggest somewhere to try.

All along that North coast of the SE, from Rochester to Margate, is within a reasonable drive, and even down the East coast towards Dover.

The water has been murky looking wherever I’ve tried so far, but from the spinning vids I’ve watched on Youtube the bass fisherman don’t seem to think it makes that much difference.
 

WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
I have fished since I was a kid but, to be honest, I'm no expert as I don't get out enough. My most successful spinning fishing (actually my most successful fishing) has always been on the rocky west coast when the tide is rushing in and the water crashing against the rocks - find a run and cast into it retrieving fast. BUT - this is the most dangerous type of fishing I know - fast water, crashing waves and incoming tide can lead to being swept off the rocks.


Yeah, I won’t do anything silly. The retrieval’s interesting too, I’ve seen advocates for a fast wind retrieval, one that lets the lure sink and then you lift it back up as you wind, and then others seem to pull the rod back quite hard and then wind as they point the rod back to sea.
 

WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
Water clarity would have little affect to lures, they give vibrations in the water which mimmicks injured baitfish- more often than not a predator fish will attack on sense, other than if it sees it and attacks it. Its more 'instinct'.

It's possibly due to the species of fish present not regarded as fish that can not be caught with lures, as some will ignore it in favour of actual baits with scents and juices.

Pollack, wrasse, bass, mackrel are the common fish caught with lures

Dogfish, cod, codling, Congor eel, Ray, taupe, smoothhounds, flounder all on actual baits in my experience.

Tide conditions would have the greatest impact on fishing over any other imho

Cheers, I’ll try and stick to two hours before and an hour after high tides for now then.

I don’t mind baitfishing I just find it a bit boring, I much prefer the active style of spinning but I’m just not having any luck yet.
 

Van-Wild

Full Member
Feb 17, 2018
863
679
42
UK
I lure fish for fresh water predators mostly, BFS style. When I do coastal fishing, it has been in the sea lochs in the west Highlands. Had most success with spinners and mackerel feathers. I like to fish on the slack water after a high tide. Low tide has been less productive for me. In saying all this, I'm a complete novice so I'm probably making a millions school boy errors!

I've come to this conclusion so far:

High water = Spin fishing.
Low water = wet suit, dive mask and snorkel. Go looking for lobsters and crabs.



Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
 
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WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
I lure fish for fresh water predators mostly, BFS style. When I do coastal fishing, it has been in the sea lochs in the west Highlands. Had most success with spinners and mackerel feathers. I like to fish on the slack water after a high tide. Low tide has been less productive for me. In saying all this, I'm a complete novice so I'm probably making a millions school boy errors!

I've come to this conclusion so far:

High water = Spin fishing.
Low water = wet suit, dive mask and snorkel. Go looking for lobsters and crabs.



Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk

Haha, cheers.

Speaking of lobsters, I was thinking of doing a day at the coast with the kids. Lob a bait rod in and leave it, spin fish when the tide’s up, and also stick 2-3 lobster pots in at low tide and check them at the next low tide.
 
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Van-Wild

Full Member
Feb 17, 2018
863
679
42
UK
Haha, cheers.

Speaking of lobsters, I was thinking of doing a day at the coast with the kids. Lob a bait rod in and leave it, spin fish when the tide’s up, and also stick 2-3 lobster pots in at low tide and check them at the next low tide.
The classic crabbing session always produces a tidy haul. You then have a bucket of bait for fishing! I use an old mozzie head net with a lump of bacon in it. The first two or three crabs caught get chopped in half and put in the mozzie net. This always seems to attract bigger crabs. I use the same thing to get a haul of signal Crayfish from a river local to me.

I've never used pots for lobster. Always had them by hand and hook. Diving for lobby's or crabs is always best at low tide. If you are going to throw a pot or two in, I'd recommend finding the rockiest area possible at low tide. If you can find a shelf of rock even better. When you return to harvest, don't expect to find your pots in the same place..... they will of moved somewhat with the tide. Brightly coloured floats or rope will be a great help! Check local restrictions and remember that your lobby or crab must be of the correct landing size.

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
 
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WittyUsername

Forager
Oct 21, 2020
119
39
36
Kent
The classic crabbing session always produces a tidy haul. You then have a bucket of bait for fishing! I use an old mozzie head net with a lump of bacon in it. The first two or three crabs caught get chopped in half and put in the mozzie net. This always seems to attract bigger crabs. I use the same thing to get a haul of signal Crayfish from a river local to me.

I've never used pots for lobster. Always had them by hand and hook. Diving for lobby's or crabs is always best at low tide. If you are going to throw a pot or two in, I'd recommend finding the rockiest area possible at low tide. If you can find a shelf of rock even better. When you return to harvest, don't expect to find your pots in the same place..... they will of moved somewhat with the tide. Brightly coloured floats or rope will be a great help! Check local restrictions and remember that your lobby or crab must be of the correct landing size.

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk

Cheers, will do
 

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