Caring for carbon blades

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Slaphead

Member
Nov 6, 2020
38
11
73
Bolton
I have just received three cheap Swedish knives, one stainless, two carbon.

This is the first time I have bought a knife with a carbon blade, and so I would appreciate a bit of advice.

I don't intend to experiment with patinas at the moment, so I just want a food safe oil to prevent rust. I have looked at two products: food grade mineral oil and liquid paraffin of the type that is also used as a laxative.



Is there any reason why I should choose one over the other? In either case I would remove the oil with rubbing alcohol before using the knife and only use the oil for storage protection. I know they are cheap knives but they still deserve to be taken care of.

And could I ask for recommendations for those rubberised blocks which can be run over a blade to remove small specks of rust?
 

punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
767
574
yorks
I use a bit of veg oil every now and then. Can't say I go crazy though. I know mcqbushcraft uses walnut oil.

Patina will happen.... embrace it :)
 

TLM

Native
Nov 16, 2019
1,593
700
Vantaa, Finland
I think that my oldest carbon steel knife is about 30 years old, I have never oiled it and there has never been visible rust on it, the non sharpened part has acquired a slightly dark hue that can fairly easily be brushed away, I think I once did that in the early years of use.

Coconut oil is the most stable of vegetable oils. I think that the mineral oils you show are about the same.

If the knives are used in marine environment that is a different game, there some protection does not hurt.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,508
965
Berlin
As long as you use it, it doesn't really need any protection, especially if it's stored in heated rooms.

Should you put it away for longer times, just put with the finger a thin film of some food oil on both sides of the blade, it doesn't matter which exactly. Just take what you have in the kitchen, and store the knive in a heated room, I think the best is to keep it in a wooden drawer, because the wood works moisture regulating.

Such knifes mainly tend to rust if forgotten in the shed.
 
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DaveAC

Member
Nov 25, 2020
19
7
53
GB
Clove oil works well to protect carbon blades, smells amazing and can be used to treat toothache (regular dental check ups work better for toothache)
Cheers
Dave

Sent from my FIG-LX1 using Tapatalk
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
2,508
965
Berlin
And it seems to keep ticks away.
A few drops each morning.

Some people swear by it.
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
5,007
1,566
W.Sussex
Your question has come up many times over the years and Camellia oil always seems to be the answer.


Personally, I wouldn’t worry about trying to prevent rust unless the knife is being stored unused for a long period. If this is the case then the long term storage answer is Renaissance wax. Don’t overthink it, just use them, it’s just a bit of sharp metal with a handle, it’s not going to dissolve.
 
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Murat_Cyp

Member
Sep 16, 2020
45
18
38
East Midlands
I use the camellia oil shown on above with applicator (search in google and you will see what I mean) on my carbon kitchen and wood carving knives and it worked great so far.
 

z_bumbi

Tenderfoot
Apr 22, 2016
78
42
Linköping, Sweden
Your question has come up many times over the years and Camellia oil always seems to be the answer.


Personally, I wouldn’t worry about trying to prevent rust unless the knife is being stored unused for a long period. If this is the case then the long term storage answer is Renaissance wax. Don’t overthink it, just use them, it’s just a bit of sharp metal with a handle, it’s not going to dissolve.
I use paraffin as a hard/wax-ish protection. cheaper and is used to seal jam jars so its foodsafe.
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
5,007
1,566
W.Sussex
I use paraffin as a hard/wax-ish protection. cheaper and is used to seal jam jars so its foodsafe.

Here, paraffin is a flammable liquid used as lamp and heating oil, it’s not a wax. The only paraffin wax I know is candle wax.

For longer term protection, a hard layer, Renaissance Wax is the stuff museums use for metal protection, but in the case of a knife it would be removed prior to use.

 
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Mar 31, 2021
13
8
52
Clitheroe
I patinate my carbon blades with Malt vinegar and after that they are pretty well left to their own devices....
Ferric chloride solution will oxide it darker and faster follow up with clear spirit vinegar as a drench , rinse ir clean water and then dry well and tge lightest amount of oil .
Works well as does a long soak in white vinegar of course just tge above will get you a nice even black over tge blotchy brown I tend to get with vinegar soaking
 

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