Bad bad things are going on in Norway these days. Please spread the word.

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Tengu

Full Member
Jan 10, 2006
10,907
473
47
Wiltshire
Timber is still the worlds fuel.

And its often used inefficiently.

How much wood would you save simply by putting your cooking fire into a container?
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,259
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Tradition. Turn bits of wood into charcoal ( and lose energy)
Use charcoal on an open hearth ( and lose energy)

I worked a couple of months ’back in the days’ in a Mission Clinic in Haiti. Lived with the Catholic Priest and his housekeeper/ wifelet.

Cook cooked on charcoal in a caboose in the garden while we watched tv in the AC equipped house.
We all have our little stuped customs which we can not get rid of!

Like cavity wall building style and low insulating double glazed windows in UK.
 

Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,259
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Media is reporting that the Norwegian state want all vehicles to be fully or part electric within 6 years, and will start expantion of the charging points.

So the expected need for electricity will increase lots. Seems Norway has no other choice than establishing extensive wind farms, unless they accept importing electricity produced by unsustainable means!
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
3,432
2,621
Mid Wales
Conspiracy theory: the main reason for reducing our dependence on oil and gas is so we are not dependant upon Arab states and Russia for our power; it would not then make sense to make a plan that makes us dependant on importing electricity (though, of course, the UK already does).

The beauty of distributed wind and solar energy is that it's distributed and is not easy to 'take out' otherwise the nuclear solution is probably the ideal.
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,259
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Norway has huge, simply huge, oil and mainly gas reserves in the north. They found a new field just west of the lofotens. But the (local) population is against the extraction. Me too. I like to save it for the future.

Nuclear is the best. We just need to make sure to store the remains safely. But even nuclear is not for the future, it will be phased out once Fusion is cracked.
 
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vestlenning

Settler
Feb 12, 2015
721
75
Western Norway
Media is reporting that the Norwegian state want all vehicles to be fully or part electric within 6 years, and will start expantion of the charging points.

So the expected need for electricity will increase lots. Seems Norway has no other choice than establishing extensive wind farms, unless they accept importing electricity produced by unsustainable means!
Over here batteries are all the rage, a lot of people believe that everything can run on batteries, planes included ...
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,228
234
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When we built the house here, we insulated it to Scandinavian standards, but flipped the layers, as the heat is outside.
The builders have never seen anything like what I wanted.
Our electricity bill is about 20% of what houses built with the (then) standard insulation.
Most newly built private homes are very well insulated today here.

Not only does the bills go down substantially, you also avoid cold air blowing forcefully from every vent.
The latest interesting tech is to build a house using Styrofoam blocks, with internal steel reinforcement and cavities where the concrete is poured.
Called Insulated Concrete Forms or ICF.
Is that also being used in UK these days?


That tech is fantastic, easy to build, and decent insulation. If I did another house here, I would use that tech, and add extra insulation on the inside to make it even better.

I think some very interesting info has surfaced here. I had no clue about storing the excess electricity!

Ive just completed an extension to a college that had insulated concrete form foundations.
The founds were in when I got there but almost everything else above ground is work that me and another bloke did.
The place got a 1.2 on its airtest (the best the main contractor has ever had by some margin) and is insulated with a timber based fibreboard called Pavatherm.
Quite a good system, its 100mm thick tongued and grooved boards, dead easy to put in place and doesn't have that thermal bridging problem.

This is the place...
 

GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
1,445
685
Ive just completed an extension to a college that had insulated concrete form foundations.
The founds were in when I got there but almost everything else above ground is work that me and another bloke did.
The place got a 1.2 on its airtest (the best the main contractor has ever had by some margin) and is insulated with a timber based fibreboard called Pavatherm.
Quite a good system, its 100mm thick tongued and grooved boards, dead easy to put in place and doesn't have that thermal bridging problem.

This is the place...
any more info/links would be greatly appreciated. :emoji_thumbsup:
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,228
234
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demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,228
234
-------------
I really liked that Pavatherm system, usually adding insulation is a right faff but it really was easy to do.

To be honest though, I would have far rather have made the timber framing from SIPS panels instead of the laminated veneer lumber. That made it more complicated to seal up for the airtest and a slower build in general.

I didn't have a choice in that though.
Fortunately the site agent was one of the best I've ever worked with which considering he was only 25 years old is doing very well indeed.
 

GuestD

Full Member
Feb 10, 2019
1,445
685
I really liked that Pavatherm system, usually adding insulation is a right faff but it really was easy to do.

To be honest though, I would have far rather have made the timber framing from SIPS panels instead of the laminated veneer lumber. That made it more complicated to seal up for the airtest and a slower build in general.

I didn't have a choice in that though.
Fortunately the site agent was one of the best I've ever worked with which considering he was only 25 years old is doing very well indeed.
I'm going to look further into this. What are the costs like ?
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,228
234
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I'm not positive about this because I wasn't paying for any of it, just made the timber frames, put the roof on, pavathermed the outside fitted internal vapour, sealed that up with Tescon tape, covered the Pavatherm with Tyvek, battoned it then clad it.

It would be fair to say that me and another bloke basically did the lot apart from the insulation that went between the studs (which was also made by Pavatex).
We had nothing to do with the costings although the total extension was something like £160 000.
Plenty people took a cut of that money though and I bet some of the people who did a lot less than me got a bigger cut than I did.

The architect was even a decent bloke and it's not often I say that.

If my memory serves me right though, each panel was something like 35 quid, plus fixings.
They were 580 x 1580 or so mm? By 100mm thick.
Windows required a bit of thought and pretty much every cut I did was with a Festool HKC55 set to maximum depth then cut again from the other side to get that 100mm depth.
Oh and if the boards got wet it clogged the saws bladeguard up and needed clearing so the saw was safe again.

Don't even bother trying to cut it with a handsaw, it just clogs the teeth up and stops cutting.

This site gives some decent info about what you need fixings wise although that page is just talking about panels that are different sizes. I assume thats cos the thicker panels get heavier so arent made as big in the other dimensions.
https://lifepanels.com/products/pavatex-pavatherm-combi-panels?
variant=8742784041023
 
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Janne

Guest
Feb 10, 2016
12,368
2,259
Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
Only watched the first one, will watch the second one tonight.

But, assuming we will all drive battery powered cars in the future? I doubt it.

It was first Steam powered, then Battery powered, then Petrol and Diesel, slightly interrupted with Wood Gas, then Hydrogen in the 70's, LPG after than, now Electric. Next decade - ?
Petrol and Diesel is here to stay.
I think the next Big Tech will be sequestering Carbon from the atmosphere and creating liquid Hydro Carbons.
We created liquid Hydro Carbons from Solid coal already in the 1940's.