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wire saw

Discussion in 'Kit Chatter' started by grumit, Nov 8, 2003.

  1. grumit

    grumit Full Member

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    can anyone tell me if the wire saws you can get work or are they a waste
    of time and money if they are good where can i get them :?:
     
  2. ChrisKavanaugh

    ChrisKavanaugh Need to contact Admin...

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    The only wire saw worth bothering with is the SAS multiwire saw with swivels.Everything else is junk. The USAF has a interesting single wire saw that cuts well, but it has huge turnbuckle handles and is impossible to stow. Even the SAS saw must be handled carefully.The wire heats up rapidly and has a tendancy to bind. So the keyword is slow and carefull. When your finished let it cool to avoid kinking.Once cooled it will roll up nicely. Many people prefer to create a wood bow handle which works well. For pocket kits people discard the rings and try to use paracord loop handles. These can actually melt with heat transference and are tough on fingers. Theoretically the rings enable use as a snare. I haven't tried this. I have mine in my PSK and it is well worth the wieght. Note: I hate writing hasty posts and having to edit them later for spelling. It's hard enough calibrating my spelling to british :lol:
     
  3. ChrisKavanaugh

    ChrisKavanaugh Need to contact Admin...

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    Diabolik, Will the new webbing handles work with a field expedient bow handle? A trick some people use is to slip the wire inside a length of small diameter tubing. It theoretically protects both saw and other items from abrasion and provides a seep straw. The various handheld chainsaws are nice items ( again, we have a review @ www.equipped.org) I have the "pocket saw." It comes in it's own can ( @ the size of a shoepolish tin) and is easily carried afield in a pocket. These saws are very stiff until worked in. Saws in general are a trade off with their knife and axe counterparts. An axe will make short work of assembling raw materials for fire,shelter etc. It can also make short work of the user's own limbs if tired or innattentive :shock: Saws take more time, but are safer. A small consideration is the noise factor. If you hope to observe the local fauna silence is golden.
     
  4. ditchfield

    ditchfield New Member

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    diabolik, I own 3 different types of BCB saw. One is the standard one that most people talk about with the crimps, swivels and rings. The second is one with just the crimps and larger loops. These come in the BCB survival kits. My newest one is one where the ends of the saw have been folded over, twisted and melted to form a smooth, small, compact loop. it then has the swivels and split rings like the first type mentioned. This is my favourite so far as I was able to easily thread it through a length of aquarium tubing like chris mentioned. Would you be able to shed any light on the reasons for the different types of saw and the names of each?
    Thanks
     
  5. ditchfield

    ditchfield New Member

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    diabolik,
    Thanks for you great reply, makes it clearer.
    I have just fetched the wire saw I discribed along with the origonal package. The package is that of Katz who sell BCB gear under their name as quite a few companies seem to. The blurb on the back of the package says:
    "The strongest and most effective wire saw available. 48 kilo breaking strain. Cuts wood, plastic and bone. Constructed from 8 interwoven stainless stell strands.
    Code: KM020"
    On closer inspection, the wire hasn't been folded over and melted as I said in my origonal post. What has been done is a seperate piece of has been wrapped around the end of the wire saw and then heated by the looks of it.
    Does this shed any light on it?
    Thanks
     
  6. Lee

    Lee Guest

    ditchfield,

    the last saw you mentioned sounds like bcb's most recent creation that diabolik mentioned, the plastic ends are a kinda shrink wrap,

    i have tested a few of these saws to distruction and i they are in my opinion one of the strongest wire saw yet, they are quite nifty with para cord wrist straps too that you can larks footdirectly on to the saw,

    what can i say bcb has finaly made a fine product :naughty:

    just wondering pete what are they retailing for?
     
  7. ChrisKavanaugh

    ChrisKavanaugh Need to contact Admin...

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    Diabolik, I can think of numerous fine products brought down by the demands of unit cost. The saw body itself is the selling point. Perhaps BCB can produce a version with tips widely adaptable to a variety of customer supplied handle options; split rings,webbing etc. Then print a simple set of suggestions for handle options the customer selects. BCB saves money,customers have a choice and you get a office with a window :wink:
     
  8. ditchfield

    ditchfield New Member

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    diabolik,
    Thanks for the reply. I have taken some pictures and will be able to post them today or tommorow. It looks like soft solder might have been used :-?.
    Cheers
     
  9. ditchfield

    ditchfield New Member

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    Here you go, sorry the aren't very clear.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. ditchfield

    ditchfield New Member

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    Oh, thanks. Yes, you are correct, only 2 main strands which are twisted compared with the braided wires of the BCB.
    Thanks for the info.
     
  11. deep shock

    deep shock New Member

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    ok but then can you tell us what wire saw if any to use on fresh wood instead?
     
  12. Gary

    Gary New Member

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    THE WIRE SAW DEBATE IS LIKE THE KNIFE DEBATE and has gone on as long - the best saw is the saw you have with you at the time and if you have a choice its the saw your most comfortable with!

    Wire saws need to be kept ridged and as such made into a bow, this will solve most problems there (in the simplist of terms) if it breaks then you can always adjust things, make the blade shorter and try again.

    All these pocket chainsaws and such ........ well make up your own mind. I personally dont like them at all being neither one thing nor another.

    The best saw (imo) is still a folding saw like the LAPLANDER - robust and reliable. Can used one handed, which is handy (no pun intended) when working on branches over head or if injured!

    If it aint broken dont fix it.
     
  13. TheViking

    TheViking Native

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    Don't put everything else under one umbrella. :wink:
    I have a 2 £ wiresaw and it works great! :wink: Nothing to complain on that one....
     

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