Wolf Attack on Dog

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Haggis

Nomad
When I lived in the southern U.S. there were dogs and cats running loose nearly everywhere. When I moved to Northern Minnesota, where there are many thousands of wolves, coyotes, and black bears, I was pleasantly surprised to see very few dogs wondering any distance from their homes. It didn't take much reasoning to determine why there were so few house pets in the bush.

Here is a very graphic, (please don't look if you're at all squeamish), video of just what wolves will do to dogs if they can catch them. Forgive me if this video offends anyone, that is not my intent; I enjoy both dogs and wolves.

http://vancouverisland.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=301866
 

rik_uk3

Banned
Jun 10, 2006
13,320
20
66
south wales
More dogs have disappeared there so it looks like the Wolves have a taste for dog and not much fear of the locals.
 

mousey

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 15, 2010
2,210
253
39
NE Scotland
I was quite surprised to see the other two dogs not doing very much. I kinda thought there be a really big barny rather than the wolf practically just walking up to one and walking off without a fight.
 

Uilleachan

Full Member
Aug 14, 2013
585
5
Northwest Scotland
In places where there are feral dogs (my main experience of feral dogs comes from my time spent working in the eastern sahara, no shortage there), they'll eat each other if they can. The big alphas in particular will actively kill & eat any other dogs that aren't attached to their pack/family group, lesser status dogs and bitches will take advantage too if they can, particularly with puppies separated from their mothers.

Dogs within packs/family groups will eat any of their own that get killed, run down on the road, injured in a fight with other dogs then die; the rest will defend the corps of a relative from others, sometimes to the death; then they eat their relative, not in a frenzy but rather in a calm measured manner thats almost respectful. I kind of think it's in an effort to stop the corps falling into the jaws of the rivals.

That wolves will take dogs and other dogs won't intervene to help is simply the law of the jungle. Swap those dogs for a few big working dogs, Irish wolfhound type or Romanian Sheep dogs and the wolves won't get involved, unless they've got them significantly out numbered and the alpha wolf fancies his chances, but then there are a fair few thousand wolves in Romania and even more working sheep dogs that don't seem to get eaten. When I say Romanian sheep dog, I'm not talking a cuddly collie ;) Rather a doggy thats employed to guard sheep; from wolves.
 
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mousey

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 15, 2010
2,210
253
39
NE Scotland
I suppose I was thinking that the domestic dogs were a pack. I'd be very surprised if one of my dogs was attacked and the others just stood there and looked.... I'd also be surprised if I or any other member of my family was attacked [by a dog or other humans] and they'd just let it happen.
 

xylaria

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
The romanian dogs look like aikitas in sheeps clothing. The dogs in the video look like sled mongrels I am surprised they didnt mount a more vicious defence. I read a blog of guy who lives in a national park in the us whose dogs and him got attacked. Really awful pictures, some of his dogs survived and they fought to defend him and each other.
 

CLEM

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jul 10, 2004
2,027
119
Stourbridge
I too was surprised the other two dogs didn't attack the wolf, three together should have seen it off! What was surprising also was just how much stronger the wolf appeared to be!
 

atlatlman

New Member
Dec 21, 2006
750
0
ipswich
Looks to me that the wolf was just looking to get laid. I reckon if they went looking for the bitch they would find her somewhere smoking a cigarette with a big smile on her face.
 

Uilleachan

Full Member
Aug 14, 2013
585
5
Northwest Scotland
Thank you Uilleachan, I enjoyed that bit of observation and insight,,,

Thanks, the place I worked in the eastern desert had several packs of dogs. One day the only other westerner in the locale arrived back with a puppy he'd rescued from a big brute of a mutt we called Blacky. The meanest nastiest mongrel in the area. Anyway Stevie christened the pup Charlie, we became Charlie's pack, defended her (turned out to be a bitch :D) from all comers until she started a family of her own. By the time I left for good she was a grannie with her own little pack, last I heard she was the matriarch of the substantial "Charlie Pack", a shy but almost human friendly pack of dogs, if rather selective in whom they were friendly too.

My Lithuanian chum who took over from me was telling me her original mate (a horrid nasty beast) got killed in a fight, and Charlie ate him herself over a few days. On the brighter side, he reports the entire pack would accompany him on his daily jogs keeping a respectful distance.

When Charlie was small I didn't rate her chances, just goes to show.

Here she is with Stevie;

Charlie & Stevie .jpg

Charlie the desert dog, a portrait;

Charlie the desert dog.jpg

And the survivors of Charlie's first batch of pups, 3 out of 7, not a bad result given the circumstances, one other got killed but two went on to form the nucleus of her gang;

Charlies Pups.jpg
 

Welshwizard

Forager
Aug 11, 2011
213
0
Abergavenny Wales
its appalling how hard the lives are for some of these dogs that have originated from careless human care (or lack off) and it happens around the world ( including UK ) just cant understand why
people have them and then dump them like a used condom , my wife works as district health worker and meets some of the worst that cant even look after their children let alone a pet .
 

Haggis

Nomad
I can't even suppose what is in the minds of some who have dogs. When I trapped furs in the southern U.S., I would on occasion catch a dog. the typical scenario was:
1 - I catch free roaming unlicensed dog - release dog unharmed - owner threatens to sue me
2 - Later the same dog bites neighbors child - owner (same person who threatened to sue me) claims to have no knowledge of whose dog it may be
3 - Still later - dog is killed by a vehicle in the road - dogs lays in the road in front of owners' home until the road service cleans it up the remains

In 3rd world countries, or neighborhoods, I suppose there are few laws concerning dog ownership, and little in the way of money to control the feral dog population. In 1st world countries, outside of most towns, dogs roam far too freely, and cause far too much damage. Thankfully, here in wolf, bear, and coyote country, nature has provided its own feral animal management system.
 

Toddy

Mod
Mod
Jan 21, 2005
36,267
2,246
S. Lanarkshire
"In 1st world countries, outside of most towns, dogs roam far too freely, and cause far too much damage. Thankfully, here in wolf, bear, and coyote country, nature has provided its own feral animal management system."

Where ? we wander all over Scotland, and I don't see dogs roaming freely, nor in England and Wales either. Stray dogs are rounded up and if you want to rehome then it costs you money from RSSPCA or Dog's Trust or similar. Stray dogs near hillfarms with sheep get shot if the farmer's at all suspicious about their behaviour; never mind phoning to get them picked up.

Stray dogs are reported to the police or local authorities and they have a legal obligation to collect them.

Maybe it's easier because we're on islands ?

M
 

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