Why Dont You?

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Gary

New Member
Apr 17, 2003
2,603
0
53
from Essex
Does anybody remember this programme? Reason I ask is I was chatting about it and its 'go out and do something' phrase while I was in Norway and this got me thinking about BCUK.

If I was more PC literate Id have built this as a poll but as I'm not I will ask it as a question, Why don't you?

Another thought I had was I wondered how many people would say their knowledge was more practical over theory or vica versa?

This isn't meant to be condescending, just a couple of simple questions the answers to which I pondered for many a snow bound hour last week and ones I'd like to share we the members of this forum.
 

Kim

New Member
Sep 6, 2004
473
0
46
Birmingham
Are you kidding, of course I remember Why Don't You! Didn't they have a animated television in the titles or something...?

For me theory definately outweighs practice. :shock:
 

steve a

Settler
Oct 2, 2003
811
4
south bedfordshire
Well I think you need to be a bit long in the tooth to remember that programme Gary :wink:
Shows how old I am as I remember my younger brother and sister watching it :yikes:
If I was more computer literate, I'd build the poll thingy for you :shock:

Skills, practical or theory :- Need to sit on the fence on this one a bit, most of my skills, such as they are, are practical. There are exceptions, mainly snow and cold weather skills, just not had the opportunity :cry:
Maybe next year I will be able to book a course :naughty: and put theory into practice.
 

tenbears10

Native
Oct 31, 2003
1,220
0
xxxx
It was always quite ironic that why don't you? told you to get out and stop watching TV but yet you had to be in every day to watch it... on tv :?:

Practice is best but mundane life gets in the way more often than not. Stuff like Ashdown and the East Anglia Meet give you a set date to get out and practice with others you can look forward to it and make the effort to be there.

Bill
 

jamesdevine

Settler
Dec 22, 2003
823
0
44
Skerries, Co. Dublin
I am with Kim more Thoery then practise simply because I read the How to and it can be some time before I get to put them in to practise so I end up with more ideas in my head of how to do something then actual practical experience of something working for me.

Time or the lack off it is often my excuse :cry: which when I look at is a pretty lame one. I have a back garden so there should be no excuses to get out and experiment.

I do remember the show but I don't remeber whatching it that much for some reason.

James
 

Adi007

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
4,080
0
The interesting thing about that concept is that if everyone had "go out and done something less boring instead" it would have sunk the TV show. Oddly enough, the show's not around any more ...

Q. What's the difference between Theory and Practice?
A: In theory there is no difference, but in practice there is.

I've found that htis is true of most things ... but then again, I'm a practical sort of guy!
 

bambodoggy

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 10, 2004
3,062
50
45
Surrey
www.stumpandgrind.co.uk
"Whyyyyy don't you, just switch off your television set, go do something less boring instead"!!!!!!

Nope, never heard of it..... :eek:): :nana:


Never really liked the show myself....I could never understand how I was supposed to do both....watch Y-don't-U on TV and switch it off and go out....I tended to just go out anyway and miss it....

As for my skills....I'd say it depends, if it's camping then practical more than theory....or for example if it's trapping then Theory more than practical.... problem is to list all my skills both practical and theoretical....! :lol:

I think it's far too large a question to try and answer on a post or Admin will moan I've taken up heaps of space!!! Very interesting thought to get us all thinking though :biggthump
 

Kath

Native
Feb 13, 2004
1,397
0
Oooh I hated that show but curiously enough I always followed its instructions and went outside and did something less boring instead.

I've never really got the hang of theory - especially in relation to the outdoors. You either get on with it or you don't. Sure books etc can help, but hey you're never going to know until you give it a try! :-D
 

Andy

Native
Dec 31, 2003
1,867
9
34
sheffield
www.freewebs.com
Gary said:
knowledge was more practical over theory or vica versa?
Niether. I'm not sure where normal life ends and bushcraft begins. If bushcraft is more of a way of thinking then anything else then how can we categorise it?

I guess all the hunting/trapping stuff is all theory to me so for the sake of the thread I'll say theory


PS will gives it's theory without a doubt
 

Adi007

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
4,080
0
Don't worry Gary - it's interesting though that similar questions are posted on computer-related forums all the time. Take computer programming as an example, there are people who talk a lot (the armchair programmers) and there are those who've put in the time, effort and study to be able to do something and combined that theory with plenty of practical.

Everything is a combination of theory vs. practical - you can keep whizzing the bow drill or knapping at flints and get nowhere without a little knowledge behind what you're doing (same here - you could try forever to randomly add a poll to a thread but if you know you need to scroll down to "Post a Poll" and tick the box and then choose how many questions you want to ask, then click "Submit New Thread", then add the poll question and options on the next page, it's a lot easier :wink: )
 

jakunen

Native
Yes I remember it (especially the one to do with the british motor racing) and likewise couldn't quite get my head around them telling us to go and do something but stay glued to the TV to see what it was we should have been doing instead of being glued to the TV...

I think my theory and practice are fairly evenly balanced thanx to a life long love of the outdoords a hatred of boredom and most of the rubbish they call 'TV programming'.
 

Gary

New Member
Apr 17, 2003
2,603
0
53
from Essex
I'll stick to rubbing sticks together and leave computers to those better suited, but thanks for the tip!

SCROLL DOWN and do something, must remember that! :wink:
 

outdoorgirl

Full Member
Sep 25, 2004
364
12
nr Minehead
This is always an interesting question, and the answer will depend on the type of person you are. In management courses, you're taught that people prefer to learn in different ways; some are 'thinkers' and prefer to watch someone else, read instructions, etc. Some are 'doers' and just want to jump right in.

Also, people respond differently to stimuli, so some are biased towards aural, visual, or kinetic stimuli - meaning that some people prefer to listen to something (like books on tape), some prefer looking (at a video, or in-person demonstration), and some prefer a more hands-on approach. The best courses use all three methods to get the point across and reach all types of delegate.

It's another of those questions where there is no true answer, as it always depends on the personalities involved... :)
 

RovingArcher

Need to contact Admin...
Jun 27, 2004
1,069
1
Monterey Peninsula, Ca., USA
Never got to see the program. I was into the woods, fishing and camping from early on. That is, when I wasn't with Howdie Doodie.

Go out and do something? I do. I've been an activist in many areas for a very long time. Mostly having to do with Earth conservation, planting trees, cleaning up abused lands, etc.

Much of my knowledge is theory until applied, but all of my skills are practiced.
 

Gary

New Member
Apr 17, 2003
2,603
0
53
from Essex
outdoorgirl said:
This is always an interesting question, and the answer will depend on the type of person you are. In management courses, you're taught that people prefer to learn in different ways; some are 'thinkers' and prefer to watch someone else, read instructions, etc. Some are 'doers' and just want to jump right in.

Also, people respond differently to stimuli, so some are biased towards aural, visual, or kinetic stimuli - meaning that some people prefer to listen to something (like books on tape), some prefer looking (at a video, or in-person demonstration), and some prefer a more hands-on approach. The best courses use all three methods to get the point across and reach all types of delegate.

It's another of those questions where there is no true answer, as it always depends on the personalities involved... :)


Surely the answer is simple enough here,

Practical = you go out and do it
Theory = you sit home with a book or on the computer/tv

At least that is what I am getting at.
 

Viking

Full Member
Oct 1, 2003
961
1
43
Sweden
www.nordicbushcraft.com
It does not matter how many books you read, it´s all theory and most of it wont work in reality. If you practice it and use your own head you can come up with lots of new ideas to do things.

Everyone who has build or tried to build quinze knows that it looks good in theory but does not work that good in practice.

Conclusion, I am more practical and don´t like theory that much.
 

arctic hobo

Native
Oct 7, 2004
1,630
4
33
Devon *sigh*
www.dyrhaug.co.uk
I wholeheartedly agree with that. Practice is what counts, and it is best to find your own way. It's better to get stuck, maybe consult a book that has something you'd not have thought of, and go on on your own than to sit at home learning all the theory and then go into the arctic thinking you are more than able - this is a very easy way to die in fact.
 

ESpy

Settler
Aug 28, 2003
860
4
49
Hampshire
www.britishblades.com
Gary said:
Practical = you go out and do it
Theory = you sit home with a book or on the computer/tv
Yup. Better yet, you learn it in comfort first, then apply it. I *like* gathering theoretical skills, but without a practical application there seems very little point.

The real trick is being able to apply theory when you need to, as well as being able to adapt it to not-entirely-perfect conditions. I'm not just referring to bushcraft here, natch.