Which axe head

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Pepperana

Full Member
Dec 3, 2009
355
0
Netherlands
Hi Guys,

I found 2 axe heads in my fathers barn.
I was looking for a Gränsfors Bruks Small Forrest Axe but now im thinking of making one of these complete .

One head is a 1000 Gram (top one on the pic.).
And the other is 800 Gram (bottom one on the pic.).
The dimensions are in cm.

Which one is best suited for Bushcrafting?
The total weight of the SFA is 1 kg if you look to the specs.
So the 800 Gram one with a 50cm handle will also be approx 1kg.




Pics are clickable.
 
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Everything Mac

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 30, 2009
3,106
82
34
Scotland
They both look like very nice axes. - they need a bit of a clean up obviously.
If I were you - I would clean them both up, grind off the mushrooming metal and put a new handle on both of them.

I would wager that two handles will still be cheaper than a new SFA and you have two axes.

- personally I favour a heavier axe for general duties so I would probably use the 1000gram head.

But they will both be perfectly good for bushcraft use.
 

ananix

Tenderfoot
Apr 24, 2010
51
0
Denmark
If you are gonna use it for woodcraft and not just spliting wood, i would recomend you the lighter one, as you seem to be quite new with an axe you will be better of with getting more technique than power.

But as already stated its no effort to rehandle an axe takes no money and is in it self woodcraft :) so the problem is not so big :)
 

ananix

Tenderfoot
Apr 24, 2010
51
0
Denmark
Definitely do both.

In regards to my last threat one could do the light one a small one hand axe, and the heavy one a mid size two hand axe, also usable for onehand with strength and technique in regards to a tenderfood (not neseseraly the questioneer).
 

Everything Mac

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 30, 2009
3,106
82
34
Scotland
having thought about it - I would say put a shorter handle on the 800g head - say around 14"

then put a 20" handle on the heavier head.

then you have two totally different axes to use.


As ananix said - you sound quite new to axes - so best take it slowly and make sure you know what you are doing before you start doing some serious wood work.
Many people thing it is best to learn with a hatchet.

All the best
Andy
 

gregs656

Full Member
Nov 14, 2009
125
0
West Sussex
My larger hatchet is a 800g head (I think) on a approx 20" handle (not measured) and weighs a shade over a kilo. It's a great size of hatchet. My smaller one is on a 14" handle and weighs in at approx 650g.
 

Pepperana

Full Member
Dec 3, 2009
355
0
Netherlands
Thanks all for the quick replys!!

I used an axe before. Most small ones for some for some small work around the farm.
So I'm a beginner.
I like your handles idea Andy!

Any tips on how to get them nice clean?
Grind then down ore are there other methods.
 

gregs656

Full Member
Nov 14, 2009
125
0
West Sussex
before you do anything get them handled up and use them. There's no point spending hours tidying them up if they prove not to be great tools.
 

Everything Mac

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 30, 2009
3,106
82
34
Scotland
Thanks all for the quick replys!!

I used an axe before. Most small ones for some for some small work around the farm.
So I'm a beginner.
I like your handles idea Andy!

Any tips on how to get them nice clean?
Grind then down ore are there other methods.

- well I personally would grind off the "mushroomed" metal at the back of the heads. then grind off any nasty dents to the sides etc.

other than that - a good going over with a wire brush will sort out most of the rust.

depends how shiny you want it all really. - a good sharpen and new handles and you are sorted.

Andy
 

ananix

Tenderfoot
Apr 24, 2010
51
0
Denmark
before you do anything get them handled up and use them. There's no point spending hours tidying them up if they prove not to be great tools.

It's all practise and half the fun :) getting your own experiences, making a better and personal next time, and become selfsuficient with tools in ease and speed, its what i understand with practising bushcraft :)
 

gregs656

Full Member
Nov 14, 2009
125
0
West Sussex
It's all practise and half the fun :) getting your own experiences, making a better and personal next time, and become selfsuficient with tools in ease and speed, its what i understand with practising bushcraft :)

yep, I don't disagree with you, how ever I personally don't see the point in spending hours making them look pretty to find out they have a poor heat treat and don't function effectively. Maybe that's just me.
 

Everything Mac

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 30, 2009
3,106
82
34
Scotland
yep, I don't disagree with you, how ever I personally don't see the point in spending hours making them look pretty to find out they have a poor heat treat and don't function effectively. Maybe that's just me.

If that were a concern then a quick file test would calm any worries.
 

TJRoots

Nomad
Jul 16, 2009
336
0
31
East sussex
That was a good find, they look like very nice heads.
For tidying up the heads i'd say file away all the lumps, bumps and notches, then go over it with a wire brush or some coarse wire wool, then if your still not happy with the result give it a good rubbing down with some medium gritt wet or dry sandpaper then a light going over with some fine gritt wet or dry and that will leave you with a shiny new metal look, then wack your handle on and sharpen it.
You could sharpen it before sticking it on the handle but in my experience i find it reduces the risk of injury to leave it blunt untill you've done all other work on it.

Beware, rehandling axes is highly addictive! :p
 

Pepperana

Full Member
Dec 3, 2009
355
0
Netherlands
This is my progression so far.
I'm only making a handle for the 800gram and when its finished i will have a idea how it works and handles. Then the 1kg had is turn.

I grinded the head with a dremel and removed the edges.
I dont want it to look all shiny, so i just removed the rust.
A mate had a nice Ash beam so that came in handy. The jigsaw did the rest. No i need to buy a grater.
The pics.













 

Pepperana

Full Member
Dec 3, 2009
355
0
Netherlands
One handle ready 800gram. I made it 45cm long.



Thanks for the good advice guys!
It was a very enjoyable job to make the handle. With all wood is a very nice material to work with.
And very good to see your own handle on the Axe.
Now i need to make a nice sheath for it. Also something new for me.
 
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