under estimated tools

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slowworm

Native
May 8, 2008
1,143
188
Devon
First things first, I need to build a workshop! Then I need a decent workbench, nothing posh, just something able to clamp the wood I working on firmly to be able to use a plane.
 

demographic

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Apr 15, 2005
4,291
284
-------------
First things first, I need to build a workshop! Then I need a decent workbench, nothing posh, just something able to clamp the wood I working on firmly to be able to use a plane.
Paul Sellers does a couple of workbench project builds which are worth a watch.
Oh I forgot to mention.
If you're looking for woden planes it seems that its generally acepted that the ones with the cap iron are better than those without for taking fine shavings.
I only have two planes without a cap iron and one I use as a scrub so I'm not best placed to give an informed opinion.
Oh and if you're looking on Ebay, I think the Germans call them Doppelhobel which I think translates as double plane and is handy cos the Germans make some really workmanlike versions.
 

MartiniDave

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Aug 29, 2003
2,301
80
58
Cambridgeshire
I've just had to replace a lot of rotten timber in my shed, basically half the floor and most of one side. I ended up using very few tools, but those turned out to be the real essentials. They were:
  • Decent claw hammer.
  • Hand saw.
  • Speed square.
  • Tape measure.
  • Battery drill - again a decent one - Makita in my case.
  • Large combination pliers.
  • Handsaw.
  • 1" chisel.
Just about all the other tools in the shed went unused for this project.
Oh - I did use the hi-lift jack from the Landy to lift the middle of the shed where it had started to collapse into itself where the supports had gone to a Wheetabix - like structure.

Dave
 
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punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
516
335
yorks
a friend has a big ol' silky zubat. Very jealous. Lovely bit of kit. There must be some good alternatives out there though, Husqvarna do anything like that?
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
4,833
1,446
55
W.Sussex
a friend has a big ol' silky zubat. Very jealous. Lovely bit of kit. There must be some good alternatives out there though, Husqvarna do anything like that?
Someone here, I forget, recommended something similar to a Silky but not as costly. I don’t mind the cost really. I used my Zubat all the time as a tree surgeon, had it years and only replaced the blade three times. It has had some serious use and abuse, even 6” thick dry Beech when out camping and needing to keep the fire going overnight.
 
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punkrockcaveman

Full Member
Jan 28, 2017
516
335
yorks
Someone here, I forget, recommended something similar to a Silky but not as costly. I don’t mind the cost really. I used my Zubat all the time as a tree surgeon, had it years and only replaced the blade three times. It has had some serious use and abuse, even 6” thick dry Beech when out camping and needing to keep the fire going overnight.
My mate in question is a tree surgeon :) although he finds the zubat a bit unwieldy up in the trees... which is a bonus as on occasion I help him out and get to use it. Not often you get to put something like that on your belt whilst not looking like a serial killer
 

Nice65

Full Member
Apr 16, 2009
4,833
1,446
55
W.Sussex
My mate in question is a tree surgeon :) although he finds the zubat a bit unwieldy up in the trees... which is a bonus as on occasion I help him out and get to use it. Not often you get to put something like that on your belt whilst not looking like a serial killer
The Zubat doesn’t feel too unwieldy, but the Ibuki I got issued at work was. Anything above the capability of a Zubat while up a tree needs a chainsaw really. Mind you, the Zubat comes in different lengths, 300, 330, and 390mm. I reckon the 390 is a bit big, I’m fairly sure I have the 330.