To bi(pod) or not to bi(pod)

Ratbag

Settler
Aug 10, 2005
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That's my question anyway.

I'm in two minds as to whether to fit a bipod to my air r*fle: Part of me thinks its extra weight, extra cost and I should just learn how to shoot better. The other part thinks that it could be an aid to consistent longer-range shooting (but we're only talking air r*fle distances here) and I should take advantage of the additional stability it may provide to ensure my pellets hit the kill-zone.

I'd be interested to get your thoughts, particularly as a lot of the pics posted up here recently show people's pride-and-joys all 'podded-up.

A supplementary question would be whether it worth going for all that tilt and pan functionality, or if a basic model will do the job.

Thanks in advance for your comments

Rat
 

bambodoggy

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 10, 2004
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www.stumpandgrind.co.uk
I shoot most often without a bipod as I think it helps to keep my aim up, however, I do have a cheap ebay plastic clip on bipod that is usually with me when I'm out after rabbits.

Actually while typing this I've just looked mine up....I got it here:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/BIPOD-STAND-B...ryZ52509QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

I don't think it'd be any use for fullbore shooting as the recoil might unclip it but for smallbore or air rif1es as a cheap and cheerful (keep it in the leg pocket of your lightweights) it's pretty good to be fair.

Hope that helps,

Bam. :D
 

British Red

M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)
Dec 30, 2005
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Ratbag,

My view of the matter is that target shooting is one thing, hunting another. In hunting I think we should use whatever helps us ensure a clean, certain shot.

I have an integral pod on one rifle (a Steyr Scout). On others I use a Harris 'S' type bypod that attaches to a QD stud. Clones are available at a reasonable price. The advantage with the QD stud attachment is you can move the pod between rifles in a couple of seconds and it doesn't bear on the barrel.

You could also try cross sticks, a forward bean bag or even a bench rest. A bi-pod offers a good compromise of stability and portablility though

Red
 

spamel

Banned
Feb 15, 2005
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Bam, that looks like a nice cheap option into bipods. If you find it doesn't suit you, what have you lost? A couple of quid.

Matt, do you shoot from the prone or kneeling/standing/sitting positions? If I can get along to the club with you some time, I may be able to pass on a few tips, I'm no expert though as air rifles are slightly different to the SA80.



The air rifles are probably more powerful and don't get so many stoppages!! :lmao:
 

Buckshot

Mod
Mod
Jan 19, 2004
6,111
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British Red said:
In hunting I think we should use whatever helps us ensure a clean, certain shot.
I completely agree BR
I always take something to help steady my aim. Not because I can't shoot without it but because, as a responsible hunter I owe it to the target to gaurantee, as much as possible, a clean despatch.

Mark
 

Joff

Forager
Jul 31, 2005
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I agree with Red and Buckshot - whatever it takes to ensure a clean kill! You could perhaps argue that using a rest will make you a lazy shot but if that is really a problem then you can always do the 'freehand' stuff on a range or against artificial targets. Best of both worlds then.
 

Ratbag

Settler
Aug 10, 2005
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Buckshot said:
I completely agree BR
I always take something to help steady my aim. Not because I can't shoot without it but because, as a responsible hunter I owe it to the target to gaurantee, as much as possible, a clean despatch.

Mark
Thanks fellas, I think your comments are the conclusion I was coming to, too.

Spam, if we have a foray to the club I'll take you up on that.

Cheers

Rat
 
home made shooting sticks are a good compromise, couple of mid weight bamboo canes, and para cord cut them to length and lash them together on the thicker end, two bits of pipe lagging over the supporting ends will protect your air rifles wood work.
If you want to get all stealthy like, wrap each cane in a suitably subdued fabric tape and away you go.
I tend to shoot sitting and for me the formula works, and cost pennies in comparison to a harris or logun type bipod.....
Cheers Tim
 
bambodoggy said:
I shoot most often without a bipod as I think it helps to keep my aim up, however, I do have a cheap ebay plastic clip on bipod that is usually with me when I'm out after rabbits.

Actually while typing this I've just looked mine up....I got it here:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/BIPOD-STAND-B...ryZ52509QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

I don't think it'd be any use for fullbore shooting as the recoil might unclip it but for smallbore or air rif1es as a cheap and cheerful (keep it in the leg pocket of your lightweights) it's pretty good to be fair.

Hope that helps,

Bam. :D
Yes, good little bipod, got one myself off Ronnie, he sells useful stuff, I've had a few bits off him over a few months! I like him because he's genuine and helpful!
 
remember if you shoot a Spring airgun (recoiling) of a Bipod you will get a POI change (though i have been told by one guy he dosnt)
on a springer the recoil (actually it isnt but its a close enough description of the gun moving) starts well before the pellet even starts to move let alone leaves the barrel.
this is why consistancy of hold is so important for good springer shooting as it will jump slightly differntley if you dont. The bipod notmally gives a bigger jump and can be erratic or unusable on some guns just like trying to shoot by resting on a hard surface. Springers may even show diffences of POI from Prone Kneeling and standing

this is one of the main reasons PCP are said to be more accurate, They arnt its just a lot less hold depenant for a consitant shot release
Fire arms are differnt again as generally the bullet has left the barrel well before much movement takes place.

I shoot with Bipods on all my PCP airguns even fitted for FT or hunting as its a good way to put a gun down safley and out of wet grass when waiting for a Peg or dealling with a shot rabbit

ATB

Duncan
 

Celtic Dragon

New Member
Aug 4, 2003
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If your going for a bipod, get a Harris one, best by a mile. Trust me, I have 1 of those cheap plastic 1's and a B square. Both reside in the spares bin next to the scrap pile.
 

Ratbag

Settler
Aug 10, 2005
936
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FGYT said:
remember if you shoot a Spring airgun (recoiling) of a Bipod you will get a POI change...
Thanks Duncan

Sorry, I should have stated that, in this case, it's a PCP I'm talking about.

Rat
 

rapidboy

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Jun 14, 2004
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BB
They can slow you down but i do like to use one for long range hunting.
I use Harris and a Harris clone on various rifles.
Another unconventional way to steady up is to use a FT style over arm sitting stance ?
It's very quick to drop down and support the rifle across your arm and braced with your knees and it's very steady.
 

spamel

Banned
Feb 15, 2005
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Do you mean like cradling a baby? Or hugging your knees whilst sitting down?

There are a lot of different ways of holding a rifle for different stances, but I suppose it all comes down to the rifle you are using, your overall build and physical strength and also what is comfortable to you. I've seen people fire the SA80 standing in about three different ways completely. A longer rifle would pose problems with one or two of the styles I've seen, but one way could work, possibly.

If you are standing, try this:

Rifle in the shoulder (say right for the purpose of this explanation) ready to fire, holding the rifle as normal for a standing shoot with right hand at the trigger, but take the left arm out, elbow pointing towards muzzle, bend the forearm back towards the trigger and place your left hand on your right elbow or middle of the forearm. The rifle should be resting on the crook of your arm, and you are cradling the rifle. This is helpful with shorter rifles, although I have never tried it with a long. Give it a go and see how you get on, hopefully my description makes sense.
 
spamel said:
If you are standing, try this:

Rifle in the shoulder (say right for the purpose of this explanation) ready to fire, holding the rifle as normal for a standing shoot with right hand at the trigger, but take the left arm out, elbow pointing towards muzzle, bend the forearm back towards the trigger and place your left hand on your right elbow or middle of the forearm. The rifle should be resting on the crook of your arm, and you are cradling the rifle. This is helpful with shorter rifles, although I have never tried it with a long. Give it a go and see how you get on, hopefully my description makes sense.
Yes thats one of the FT sitting positions with your left elbow being supported by your left Knee
you can also rest your right elbow on your right knee with Bum and feet forming a stable triangle
normal taught Firearms sitting the fore stock is supported as normal by the left hand and the left fore arm rests on the left thigh which is better for most recoiling guns

Differences occure depending on Personnal height and limb length and Gun used

there are many tricks you can use with PCP airguns that contradict std firearms shooting practice as you have no recoils to deal with Dynamic tension in both arms is one but it takes practice and is best with very light PCP and fairly fast shooting giving extreame stability for a few seconds usfull in standing shots while hunting

ATB

Duncan