That "Best Survivor" question with a poll

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Expat

Forager
Feb 9, 2012
248
0
Dorset for good...!!
The question... "Which of these do you think would, today, survive longest or get out quickest if placed on their own in a random, realistic survival situation with bare bones kit?"

is totally random... No indication of scenario, location, etc.. etc..

In other words, "Who is your favourite 'Survivalist' ?? ....

IMO.... Cobblers...
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,853
1,340
63
Pembrokeshire
Anyone alive today hasproven themselves to be able to survive all that life has thrown at them - so no-one is the "best" survivor....
And I cannot see a poll...
 
For those not on Facebook, the list is currently:

Ray Mears
Dave Canterbury (Pathfinder)
John 'Lofty' Wiseman
Sir Ranulph Fiennes
Les Stroud
Cookie Monster
The man with the most luck on his side
Bear Grylls
Mors Kochanski
Cody Lundin
Steve m off of bcuk. (Which I think is really funny)

Lars Monsen
Bear Grylls' Cameraman
Bruce Parry
Ben Fogle
 

Albus Culter

Maker
Jan 14, 2013
1,379
0
West Yorkshire
For those not on Facebook, the list is currently:

Ray Mears
Dave Canterbury (Pathfinder)
John 'Lofty' Wiseman
Sir Ranulph Fiennes
Les Stroud
Cookie Monster
The man with the most luck on his side
Bear Grylls
Mors Kochanski
Cody Lundin
Steve m off of bcuk. (Which I think is really funny)

Lars Monsen
Bear Grylls' Cameraman
Bruce Parry
Ben Fogle
I love that list. I'm off to go vote for Steve :)
 

Ed Edwards

Full Member
Dec 17, 2012
380
0
Kent/London
I'd stick with this guy:

Teruo Nakamura. He was a Japanese Soldier who was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines on December 26, 1944, where he stayed, living off the land and 'Leaving No Trace' until his final surrender on December 18, 1974. Although he lasted 9 months longer than Hiroo Onada, he is largely forgotten.

It's a great story to Google. He lived for 30 years in the wild, maintaining his kit and health, whilst evading capture. Now THAT'S skill!
 

Ed Edwards

Full Member
Dec 17, 2012
380
0
Kent/London
^ read about him. he thought the war was going on the hole time didnt he
That's right. It must have been both frightening and confusing, yet he and a couple of others (he lasted the longest) maintained their self discipline and self reliance for 3 decades. Now that's 'Bushcraft'! Looking at some of my lads kit after a 24 hour exercise you certainly appreciate what they did; with less kit and less training! Hiroo Onada's (second from last to surrender) rifle was still in full working order, with 500 rounds of ammunition remaining. He only surrendered when authorities found his original Commanding Officer (from the War) and he personally ordered his soldier to lay down his weapon.

I don't doubt for one minute that the other guys in the list could survive an indefinite period of time in the wilderness, but add on the shear mental capacity these guys must have had to maintain 'stealth camping' whilst keeping healthy for all those years, in constant/sustained fear for their lives and keeping to their original mission objectives, is nothing short of incredible.

That's why my vote goes to the last man standing, Teruo Nakamura.