Sticky

  • Hey Guest, We've had to cancel our 2020 Summer BushMoot PLEASE LOOK HERE for more information.

alpha_centaur

Settler
Jan 2, 2006
728
0
41
Millport, Scotland
I keep coming accross posts where people have happened to have superglue in there kits when out and about, but why do you carry it in the first place, its not something I've ever felt the need to carry.


In saying that I've heard about using superglue to fix wounds but have no idea how you do it so can somebody explain it.
 

korvin karbon

Native
Jul 12, 2008
1,022
0
Fife
learned the hard way, i got some cheap army boots and the sole came of, so good for fixing that and glueing tent zips shut.

You can get glue in wee sachets and also throwaway tubes that are good enough for a few applications.
 

Nagual

Native
Jun 5, 2007
1,963
0
Argyll
Super glue can be used for cuts and the like, but I wouldn't advise it unless you know what you're doing. Paramedics etc use a medically sterile version ( probably the same thing in a different rapper and sold to the NHS at stupidly high prices ) The chances of being able to seal a cut shut without glueing your other hand to the wound would be well.. interesting. The reason they use it is it completely seals the wound, stops the bleeding and stops things getting in causing infection, before whisking you off to hospital for proper treatment. Well that's the theory. Of course, when out and about I would imagine it's fairly likely that you may ge bits n bobs in the cut, and sealing it up without cleaning it, far from proper medical care may or may not be the most sensible thing to do.


Nag.
 

AJB

Native
Oct 2, 2004
1,821
8
52
Lancashire
I keep coming accross posts where people have happened to have superglue in there kits when out and about, but why do you carry it in the first place, its not something I've ever felt the need to carry.


In saying that I've heard about using superglue to fix wounds but have no idea how you do it so can somebody explain it.
I don't carry it, I never seem to have much luck with glues - I think my expectations are too high, but they never seem to live up to their claims.

As to its medical use - "super glue" or the variety of cyanoacrylate adhesives were developed in the late 50s for medical use, to bond the edges of wounds and diluted to stop bleeding. Their use as a normal glue is a secondary application.
 

alpha_centaur

Settler
Jan 2, 2006
728
0
41
Millport, Scotland
learned the hard way, i got some cheap army boots and the sole came of, so good for fixing that and glueing tent zips shut.

You can get glue in wee sachets and also throwaway tubes that are good enough for a few applications.
For that I would have used Duck tape and/or zip ties, I'm leathal to myself with superglue anyway. I have successfully glued myself to me just by opening the flamin' tubes :lmao:
 

wingstoo

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
May 12, 2005
2,271
38
South Marches
Got a tube or two in my medic kit, just in case, always have at least two members in the team who have some first aid knowledge, even without it the other person can hopefully close the cut and glue it shut until we can get back to a hospital.

Only in emergencies though, and when the steri-strips don't work, much better than getting the sewing kit out ;)

Only use the "proper" stuff though, not the cheap copy stuff.
 

HillBill

Bushcrafter through and through
Oct 1, 2008
8,113
57
W. Yorkshire
Commercial superglue is different from medical glue.

Although not labeled as such, over-the-counter Super Glue products contain methyl alcohol, because it is inexpensive to produce. Cyanoacrylates cure by a chemical reaction called polymerization, which produces heat. Methyl alcohol has a pronounced heating action when it contacts tissue and may even produce burns if the glue contacts a large enough area of tissue. Rapid curing may also lead to tissue necrosis. Midwives have not noted such reactions because minimal amounts are being used for perineal repair. Nevertheless, with a greater toxic potential, over-the-counter products are inappropriate for use in wound closure.

Medical grade products currently available contain either butyl, isobutyl or octyl esters. They are bacteriostatic and painless to apply when used as directed, produce minimal thermal reaction when applied to dry skin and break down harmlessly in tissue. They are essentially inert once dry. Butyl products are rigid when dry, but provide a strong bond. Available octyl products are more flexible when dry, but produce a weaker bond

So basically normal superglue will work but with unpleasant side effects
 

wingstoo

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
May 12, 2005
2,271
38
South Marches
I would guess that excessive bleeding or an open wound would have a few nasty consequences as well :yuck:
 

novembeRain

Nomad
Sep 23, 2008
365
3
37
lincoln
I worked as a glazer for a bit and saw a few of the guys doing this with the superglue we had available to us stating "that's all they'd do at the hospital" Which I know isn't true but they were living proof that it works and to no adverse effects.

I think I'll start carrying some because it'll at least stop the bleeding until I can get to a hospital but I'll only be doing it if I really have to.

Hasn't it got cyanide in it?
 

harlequin

Full Member
Aug 8, 2004
157
2
54
UK
You have to also remember, guys that you close the wound/cut and lay the superglue like stitches across the cut, not in the wound.
 

Graham_S

Squirrely!
Feb 27, 2005
3,989
18
46
Saudi Arabia
I carry it in my repair kit.
I usually have some superglue, some bodge tape and some cable ties in my kit.
All have been used at some point.
I've used tape to repair tents, tarps, and trousers. Cable ties have repaired rucksacks when buckles have broken on the trail, superglue has repaired boots, knives, bags, glasses and roll mats.
I always have this stuff with me, it's saved a trip from disaster on more than one occasion.