Some usefull info on the effectivness of water treatments/ filters

birchwood

Nomad
Sep 6, 2011
325
28
Kent
Cheers for that. Interesting read.
The next time we go paddling I am only drinking beer or Southern Comfort.
 

Klenchblaize

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 25, 2005
2,584
123
61
Greensand Ridge
This is well worth watching too:
[video]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ur75grGxA64[/video]
[video]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FI82HzbIohs[/video]
K
 
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Red Kite

Nomad
Oct 2, 2006
263
0
60
London UK
I use a Sawyer on canoe trips, and always boil the water after filtering. Easy enough to boil up a couple of litres last thing and leave to cool overnight. Doubles as a hot water bottle in the winter too.

One thing I noticed, in the video, he put the foam straw into the collecting bag when he was filtering the water, according to the paperwork I got with mine its a drinking straw.
 

John Fenna

Lifetime Member & Maker
Oct 7, 2006
21,729
1,179
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Pembrokeshire
Cheers for that. Interesting read.
The next time we go paddling I am only drinking beer or Southern Comfort.
Southern Comfort?
Worse than Cryptosporidium and Giardia combined!
For purification of water the old Milbank bag and boiling looks the way forward to me :)
 

EddieP

Forager
Nov 7, 2013
127
0
Liverpool
I use a Sawyer on canoe trips, and always boil the water after filtering. Easy enough to boil up a couple of litres last thing and leave to cool overnight. Doubles as a hot water bottle in the winter too.

One thing I noticed, in the video, he put the foam straw into the collecting bag when he was filtering the water, according to the paperwork I got with mine its a drinking straw.
I guess you can use it either way. But you need to clean it well after using it on the dirty end.
 

Robson Valley

Full Member
Nov 24, 2014
8,276
1,376
McBride, BC
Don't know if I could find my notes and references if I tried. Apparently, there's a very good correlation between nutrient levels in water (manure, fertilizer runoff) and some species of fresh water algae. I was monitoring a dozen creeks prior to some encroaching commercialization in the area.
So, look at the water before you draw any at all.

The key algae are the Spirogyra sp., all of which are fine, long, green filamentous algae.
They grow well in nutrient rich water. Doesn't take a microscope to see their feathery waverings in the water flow.
The likes of which I wouldn't dream of drinking, no matter how well filtered and boiled.