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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,170
1,262
Berlin
Dutch army Saracen rucksack 120 litres.

The guy in the video is relatively small.
On an average or tall person that rucksack doesn't look so huge, but anyway, if fully loaded it becomes pretty heavy.
But it is the right size if you want to haul your complete belongings, including summer and winter clothing and a two bag winter sleep system and a full camping equipment. You can live in town, forest and field all the year round just with the well chosen stuff that fits in there and don't need to own anything else.
Nobody would go for a nice recreational hiking tour in summertime with such a load, but you can carry it for shorter distances. From the railway station to a hostel, from the Bus stop to a camping ground or slowly a few kilometres from a village into the woods.

It is possible to live out of such a rucksack without any additional storing capacities, if the content is well chosen.


Her you can see detailed photos.

Here you can buy it from a Dutch shop (with the side pouches).

This rucksack is in my opinion the best choice for you, because it can be adjusted perfectly to your back length, what is important if you carry such a load.
And it is very robust. It surely will last for decades in careful continuous use.

I recommend you to buy it, because in your situation a good rucksack is the most important piece of equipment.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,170
1,262
Berlin
This pot is surely the best option for you.
It can be used on the work shop oven, every usual stove in every hostel or wherever, and every sort of camping stove, you can hang it under a tripod over a wood fire and even bake bread in it.
It is large enough to wash your socks and underwear in it, one after the other, and to melt snow in it to get drinking water.

It's currently out of stock, and you can buy it later as you also can survive without it, but I recommend to buy it if possible.

I would put it on top of my tent or tarp in one of the side pouches.

You eat with a usual stainless steel spoon from the flea market directly out of it and don't need an extra plate.


This knife here isn't the best survival knife in the world but you always have to count in that your knife could get confiscated.
In your situation it is probably the best choice, because it is good enough and very cheap.


It is always a problem to carry nail scissors in a rucksack, because they could destroy other equipment.

That's why I recommend to you to have always this knife in the right pocket, attached with a cord to your belt, that you can't loose it. If the cord is 60 cm long you don't need to detach it if you use it.


If you have another knife and other nail scissors you can buy that later. I just tell you here the best and most sensible option for you. This knife is UK legal to carry, so it's worth the investment.

After a few years the spring of the scissors can break. Every shop that sells Victorinox knifes in every town can replace this spring for approximatly 1 £. You also can get there the replacement tooth pick and tweezers.
They also sell a blister needle that fits tight enough into a little hole in the plastic handle next to the point where the corkscrew is attached. It is sensible to invest the few cents.
Into the corkscrew fits a little grey handled screwdriver for eye glasses that also costs next to nothing.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,170
1,262
Berlin
For the mug and nesting bottle the best low budget option is this Lixada stainless steel 750ml mug with bail and butterfly handles.

You can hang it also under a tripod to purify water by boiling and to make a tea or instant coffee. You drink directly from it, it is your kettle and your cup.

More camping dishes you don't need to buy and carry. But an additional little chopping board could be handy.


Watch out for the cheapest offer.

It is also sold here a bit more expensive if you are in a hurry.


In the beginning you also can cook in it.
It's pretty small as a cooking pot but it is OK if you buy the smallest noodles you can get.

This is the nesting bottle I recommend to you. Get the clear version in the photo. You will find it easily in a UK internet shop.


For more water carrying capacity you can use plastic water bottles from the super market. You don't need the Nalgene bottle but it's good that it fits into the mug as it saves space and is very handy.

The closures of the supermarket bottles will break after a few weeks or months, that's why you should replace them after approximately 8 weeks of continuous use.
 
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TLM

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 16, 2019
2,003
945
Vantaa, Finland
Erbswurst is boardering on the far out light weigth living: carrying everything one owns. If that includes a full set of winter cloathing it is not easy but just possible. That would be the ultimate minimalist set of equipment.
 
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Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,170
1,262
Berlin
Different to most others I lived many years out of the rucksack. And I didn't do it with the stuff I just found somewhere but had been fortunately free to invest as much money as needed to try out what works the best.

It doesn't interest me if people who sit in a well heated room get boared by my packing lists if this packing list can help someone who needs it to live a comfortable minimalist lifestyle.

:)

Later you can buy 2 of these British army bottles.


In surplus shops you can find the bottle carrier pouches of the British army used and cheap. The MTP camouflage pattern version you can attach well onto the belly of the Dutch Saracen rucksack.


That is outstanding practical. Not needed in the beginning but the best option in the long run.

The 2 plastic cups that come with the army bottles are nice to have if you want to invite someone who visits you in your camp for a tea.
We don't need to become sauvages, just because we live out of the rucksack.
Your guest could eat out of the mug and you out of the pot. A reason to carry a second spoon or perhaps better a fork.
The guest can drink the soup out of the mug and doesn't need a spoon.

There are also other little MTP pouches that you can attach to the belly of the rucksack. What fits the best we can think about later if you want.
They are handy, because you can put smaller items like a wash kit in there and don't need to digg for it in larger pouches.

Such a rucksack can become a very well organised portable wardrobe case.
 
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Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,354
4,709
Mid Wales
I'm sorry Erbswurst, I know you are passionate about this subject, but another thread on a completely different subject hijacked by post after post of your kits lists! :(

The lad doesn't want to go backpacking or live travelling; he's asked for specific advice and, whether or not we agree with him, that's all this thread should offer. Without knowing more about his circumstances, offering advice on what kit he should buy (when he's already said he has no money) is really not helpful.
 

Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
3,251
2,320
63
Exmoor
I'm sure if the lad went out and bought that lot, he'd be well on his way to a decent deposit on a bedsit. He needs somewhere to live, not a kit list!
To go back to my homeless days, I had a China mug, and plate, normal cutlery knife fork and spoon, saucepan and fry pan, a little camping gas stove,sleeping bag and blanket. And a cheapo rucksack.
My main (as is the op's) concern was a roof. Had anyone told me to go and buy this or that particular bit of kit, my answer would have been how? (And thats the polite version!) I was more concerned about my shoes holding out a few more days!
Thats why I suggest he try to find a live in job on a farm or similar. It solves the roof problem, and as long as you have basic bedding, and something to cook and eat with, the rest will follow.
I was homeless without even a sofa to sleep on , at 17. By 21 I had a mortgage. Times were different then, but its still possible to get back on ones feet if my suggestion is followed.
I worry about the idea of a hole in the woods to live in. I just don't think that's a good solution at all.
But its up to op what he wants to do. Sounds like he's having a tough time.
 

TLM

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 16, 2019
2,003
945
Vantaa, Finland
I did build and over saw more than my share of underground (totally or half way) shelters. It is not difficult but all depends on the type of ground. It usually took 1-2 days for 4 men to build a shelter for themselves, on very easy sand it takes half a day. The most time consuming job was carrying, hiding and spreading the dug material. We had no instructions other than the std handbooks that did not tell how to do it. It was, I guess, just another test for officer candidates. We had an unlimited amount of timber and plastic sheating and film to use.
 

Erbswurst

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 5, 2018
3,170
1,262
Berlin
OK, @Nathan-and-delvok I will stop here to tell you what I recommend you to bring to such a shelter, as I indeed didn't respect the rules of this entertainment programme here.

If you are interested in my thoughts and experiences just drop me a personal message. And I will tell you what's needed if you want to avoid unpleasant circumstances if living outdoors without an apartment to come back if it starts to rain or snow.

I don't want to disturb the entertainment channel here.

;)
 

Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
3,251
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63
Exmoor
OK, @Nathan-and-delvok I will stop here to tell you what I recommend you to bring to such a shelter, as I indeed didn't respect the rules of this entertainment programme here.

If you are interested in my thoughts and experiences just drop me a personal message. And I will tell you what's needed if you want to avoid unpleasant circumstances if living outdoors without an apartment to come back if it starts to rain or snow.

I don't want to disturb the entertainment channel here.

;)

We at least are trying to give the lad sensible advice. Not take the ****.

That last remark i find quite flippant snarky and offensive to be honest.

Being homeless is not a joke in anybodies book, especially at such a young age.
 
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Woody girl

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Mar 31, 2018
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Exmoor
The easiest would be if he got from a farmer permission to put his tent inside a barn. It would be out of sight protected from most weather.

That is a very good idea... if he has a tent.
Farmers may be worried about using any cooking devices in a barn though, so maybe an undertaking for any cooking done to be outside of the barn.
 

TLM

Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)
Nov 16, 2019
2,003
945
Vantaa, Finland
The easiest would be if he got from a farmer permission to put his tent inside a barn. It would be out of sight protected from most weather.
Being homeless is not a joke in anybodies book, especially at such a young age.
No it is definitely not, but people have managed to overcome that. In most cases it is solved by willingness to work but sometimes even that fails.

Inside a barn even a tarp is quite enough but a tent even a very cheap one gives much better protection.
 

Broch

Full Member
Jan 18, 2009
5,354
4,709
Mid Wales
The easiest would be if he got from a farmer permission to put his tent inside a barn. It would be out of sight protected from most weather.

No it is definitely not, but people have managed to overcome that. In most cases it is solved by willingness to work but sometimes even that fails.

Inside a barn even a tarp is quite enough but a tent even a very cheap one gives much better protection.

Hey, I live in a barn and it's perfectly fine without a canvas covering (on most days) :)
 

Redhand Jack

Tenderfoot
Jan 25, 2021
50
38
Devon
+1 for WWOOFing, volunteer work on farms and woodlands in exchange for bed and board. Friend of mine had a guy come for 3 weeks to learn woodwork and he left 2 and a half years later. Probably not a permanent solution but it could be an option if you wanted it.
 

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